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Victoria I. Burke
Ryerson University
  1. Hegel, Antigone, and First-Person Authority.Victoria I. Burke - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):373-380.
    Hegel thought Sophocles' Antigone was the finest tragedy, and he put drama atop his hierarchy of the arts, precisely at the point where his system transitions from aesthetics to the philosophy of religion. Hegel concluded his Aesthetics by writing, "Of all the masterpieces of the classical and modern world, the Antigone seems to me to be the most magnificent and satisfying work of art."1The Antigone owes its place in Hegel's hierarchy to its focus on Antigone's uncanny self-certainty. Positioned at the (...)
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  2.  26
    The Politics of Contradiction.Victoria I. Burke - 2000 - Philosophy Today 44 (1):44-50.
    The nature of the self is a contested topic among feminists, many of whom deny that the self is a unified entity about which universal claims can be made. "The presumed universality and unity of the subject of feminism is effectively undermined by the constraints of the representational discourse in which it functions," writes Judith Butler in a book which aims at complicating the category of the female subject. The perspectives of Third World women have also fostered the view that (...)
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  3.  51
    Recent Dissertations.Victoria I. Burke - 1997 - The Owl of Minerva 29 (1):237-238.
    This thesis was a critique of Hegel from a Heideggerian standpoint focusing on the role of action in community. It argues, first, that Heidegger has a more highly developed account of the present of action than does Hegel on account of his theory of temporality. On the basis of a discussion of the nature of action and it's site, I examine the way in which action functions in community in both Hegel and Heidegger. For Hegel, action is essential to community (...)
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  4.  48
    Essence Today: Hegel and the Economics of Identity Politics.Victoria I. Burke - 2007 - Philosophy Today 51 (1):79-90.
    The concept of essence is thought by many political theorists to be a residue of the patriarchal onto-theological tradition of metaphysics that needs to be (or has been) overcome by more progressive aims. The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept of essentialism in light of the treatment of the concept of essence in Hegel’s Science of Logic, and within the context of recent issues in critical race theory and feminism. I will argue that the role of an (...)
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  5.  33
    Hegel and the Normativity of the Concept.Victoria I. Burke - 2011 - Idealistic Studies 41 (3):161-166.
    A lexical unit of meaning, or the concept, involves not just two moments, the rule and the following of the rule, but two reciprocally dependent moments. I argue that this links meaning to value. As a reciprocal relation, truth as normative is constituted by what Hegel calls ethical substance, which exists only between more than one consciousness, or, as Hegel would say, moments of consciousness. I read these two moments as the two shapes of consciousness that Hegel calls the master (...)
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  6.  49
    Antigone's Transgression: Hegel and Bataille on the Divine and the Human.Victoria I. Burke - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (3):535-.
    I maintain that Hegel’s reading of the Antigone underestimates the power of the negativity to which Antigone’s action is dedicated. I argue that the negativity of death and the sacred cannot, contrary to Hegel, to be sublated and thus incorporated into the progression of Spirit. Bataille’s treatment of the sacred better characterizes the unworldly force and the otherness with which Antigone and Creon are confronted when their actions bring the divine and the human into conflict. Antigone’s obedience to what she (...)
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    Kathleen Dow Magnus, Hegel and the Symbolic Mediation of Spirit . Pp. 291. ISBN 0791450465. £15.00.Victoria I. Burke - 2002 - Hegel Bulletin 23 (1-2):138-142.
    Kathleen Dow Magnus' Hegel and the Symbolic Mediation of Spirit is a welcome exposition of the role of the symbol in Hegel's philosophy, and it is an important contribution to scholarship on Hegel's philosophy of language, aesthetics, and theology. Magnus is concerned to provide an alternative to the view that Hegel fails to recognize the value of the symbol in the course of privileging the sign. As Jacques Derrida writes, "The sign, as the unity of the signifying body and the (...)
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  8. Leslie Hill, Blanchot: Extreme Contemporary Reviewed By.Victoria I. Burke - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18 (5):344-346.
     
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  9. Carolyn Bailey Gill, Ed., Maurice Blanchot: The Demand of Writing Reviewed By.Victoria I. Burke - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17 (6):409-411.
    This volume of essays is both a useful introduction to the work Maurice Blanchot and an advanced and interesting study of this work. Well-known themes of Blanchot's thought are addressed: 'death as non-dialectical other', 'conversation as a (non) meeting place', 'the absence of any present', 'the worklessness of the work' (which rewrites G.W.F. Hegel's 'work as sublation of contradiction', and 'the impossibility of any origin'. The book divides Blanchot's oeuvre into three periods: criticism, fiction, and a more recent period of (...)
     
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  10. Leslie Hill, Blanchot: Extreme Contemporary. [REVIEW]Victoria I. Burke - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18:344-346.
    Extreme Contemporary is a concise intellectual biography of Maurice Blanchot, a figure whose name, Leslie Hill claims, marks the site where the most important ideas of 19th and 20th century European philosophy overlap, intersect, and indeed, come to their fruition. It situates Blanchot as the radical heir to the questions concerning totality, experience, limit, Being, and Other, which G.W.F. Hegel and Martin Heidegger left in their wake, and it distinguishes him from George Bataille and Emmanuel Levinas, his friends and close (...)
     
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