Results for 'Victoria Reid'

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  1. The Works of Thomas Reid, D.D., Now Fully Collected, with Selections From His Unpublished Letters.Thomas Reid & William Hamilton - 1846 - Maclachlan, Stewart & Co. Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans.
     
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  2.  14
    B.B., on Sue Harris Bertrand Blier.Victoria Reid - 2004 - Film-Philosophy 8 (1).
    Sue Harris _Bertrand Blier_ Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001 ISBN: 0-7190-5297-1 166 pp.
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  3. Sympathetic Realism George A. Reid and the Academic Tradition.Christine Boyanoski, G. A. Reid & Art Gallery of Ontario - 1986
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  4.  11
    The Correspondence of Thomas Reid.Thomas Reid - 2002 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    " This collection proves otherwise, for the letters illuminate virtually every aspect of Reid's life and career and, in some instances, provide us with invaluable evidence about activities otherwise undocumented in his manuscripts or ...
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  5.  46
    Thomas Reid's Inquiry and Essays.Thomas Reid - 1863 - Bobbs-Merrill.
    INTRODUCTION Although the writings of Thomas Reid are very fertile and interesting, his life is biographically barren in comparison to such seventeenth - and ...
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  6. The Works of Thomas Reid.Thomas Reid - 1895 - James Thin Longmans, Green & Co.
     
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  7. Thomas Reid, an Inquiry Into the Human Mind: On the Principles of Common Sense.Thomas Reid - 1997 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
  8.  40
    Olympic Sacrifice: A Modern Look at an Ancient Tradition: Heather L. Reid.Heather L. Reid - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:197-210.
    The inspiration for this paper came rather unexpectedly. In February 2006, I made the long trip from my home in Sioux City, Iowa, to Torino, Italy in order to witness the Olympic Winter Games. Barely a month later, I found myself in California at the newly-renovated Getty Villa, home to one of the world's great collections of Greco-Roman antiquities. At the Villa I attended a talk about a Roman mosaic depicting a boxing scene from Virgil's Aeneid. The tiny tiles showed (...)
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  9. Thomas Reid's Inquiry and Essays.Keith Lehrer, Ronald E. Beanblossom & Thomas Reid - 1977 - Critica 9 (26):131-132.
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  10. Thomas Reid on Logic, Rhetoric, and the Fine Arts: Papers on the Culture of the Mind.Thomas Reid - 2005 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
  11. Thomas Reid's Lectures on the Fine Arts.Thomas Reid - 1973 - The Hague: M. Nijhoff.
  12.  20
    Reid on Justice as a Natural Virtue.Fred Reid & Emily Michael - 1987 - The Monist 70 (4).
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  13.  40
    An Essay by Thomas Reid on the Conception of Power.Thomas Reid & John Haldane - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):1-12.
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  14. Essays on the Powers of the Human Mind. By Thomas Reid. To Which is Prefixed an Account of the Life and Writings of the Author.Thomas Reid & Dugald Stewart - 1803 - Printed for Bell & Bradfute.
     
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  15.  8
    A Letter From President Reid.Irvin D. Reid - 1991 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):1-1.
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  16. Philosophical Orations of Thomas Reid.Thomas Reid - 1937 - Aberdeen, the University Press.
     
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  17. Philosophical Orations of Thomas Reid Delivered at Graduation Ceremonies in King's College, Aberdeen, 1753, 1756, 1759, 1762. [REVIEW]Thomas Reid & Walter Robson Humphries - 1937 - The University Press.
     
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  18. Reid's Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, From His Collected Writings by Sir W. Hamilton, and with the Foot-Notes of the Editor.Thomas Reid & William Hamilton - 1853
     
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  19. The Philosophical Orations of Thomas Reid Delivered at Graduation Ceremonies in King's College, Aberdeen, 1753, 1756, 1759, 1762. [REVIEW]Thomas Reid & D. D. Todd - 1989
     
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  20. The Philosophy of Reid as Contained in the "Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense".Thomas Reid & E. Hershey Sneath - 1892 - H. Holt.
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  21. Thomas Reid's Inquiry and Essays Edited by Keith Lehrer and Ronald E. Beanblossom; Introd. By Ronald E. Beanblossom. --.Thomas Reid, Keith ed Lehrer & Ronald E. Beanblossom - 1975 - Bobbs-Merrill.
     
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  22. The Works of Thomas Reid Now Fully Collected, with Selections From His Unpublished Letters / Preface, Notes and Supplementary Dissertations by Sir William Hamilton ; Prefixed, Stewart's Account of the Life and Writings of Reid with Notes by the Editor.Thomas Reid - 1846 - Maclachlan, Stewart and co.
     
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  23. The Works of Thomas Reid with Account of His Life and Writings.Thomas Reid & Dugald Stewart - 1813 - Printed and Published by Samuel Etheridge, Jun'r.
     
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  24. Œvres Complètes de Thomas Reid. Publ. Par T. Jouffroy, Avec des Fragments de M. Royer-Collard.Thomas Reid, Thomas Simon Jouffroy & Pierre Paul Royer-Collard - 1828
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  25.  67
    The Innateness Charge: Conception and Belief for Reid and Hume.Catherine Kemp - 2000 - Reid Studies 3 (2):43.
    Hume's notion of conception is closer to Reid's than Reid realizes and may lie behind Hume's charge in the letter to Hugh Blair (1762) that Reid's philosophy "leads us back to innate ideas".
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  26.  20
    Reid and Priestley on Method and the Mind.Alan Tapper - 2003 - In John Haldane Stephen Read (ed.), The Philosophy of Thomas Reid. pp. 98-112.
    Reid said little in his published writings about his contemporary Joseph Priestley, but his unpublished work is largely devoted to the latter. Much of Priestley's philosophical thought- his materialism, his determinism, his Lockean scientific realism- was as antithetical to Reid's as was Hume's philosophy in a very different way. Neither Reid nor Priestley formulated a full response to the other. Priestley's response to Reid came very early in his career, and is marked by haste and immaturity. (...)
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  27.  41
    Reid on Instinctive Exertions and the Spatial Content of Sensations.Chris Lindsay - 2015 - In Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.), Thomas Reid on Mind, Knowledge and Value. Oxford University Press. pp. 35-51.
    In his last great philosophical essay, 'Of Power', Reid makes the plausible claim that 'our first exertions are instinctive' and made 'without any distinct conception of the event that is to follow'. According to Reid, these instinctive exertions allow us to form beliefs about correlations between exertions and consequential events. Such instinctive exertions also explain the origin of our conception of power. In this paper, I argue that we can use the notion of instinctive exertions to address several (...)
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  28.  13
    Reid on Favors, Injuries, and the Natural Virtue of Justice.Lewis Powell & Gideon Yaffe - 2015 - In Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.), Thomas Reid on Mind, Knowledge and Value. Oxford University Press.
    Reid argues that Hume’s claim that justice is an artificial virtue is inconsistent with the fact that gratitude is a natural sentiment. This chapter shows that Reid’s argument succeeds only given a philosophy of mind and action that Hume rejects. Among other things, Reid assumes that one can conceive of one of a pair of contradictories only if one can conceive of the other—a claim that Hume denies. So, in the case of justice, the disagreement between Hume (...)
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  29.  5
    Reid in Europe.Daniel Schulthess - 1999 - Reid Studies 2 (2):p.19-30.
    Thomas Reid’s influence on continental and especially on French philosophy at the beginning of the 19th century has to be considered against the background of the crisis of the philosophical project of the moderns. This project, which is intimately related to the rise of the modern scientific world image, has one of its major tenets in the so called “theory of ideas” introduced by Descartes and developed further by Locke. By emphasizing the role of our active faculties in the (...)
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  30. Seeing White and Wrong: Reid on the Role of Sensations in Perception, with a Focus on Color Perception.Lucas Thorpe - 2015 - In Rebecca Copenhaver & Todd Buras (eds.), Thomas Reid on Mind, Knowledge, and Value (Mind Association Occasional Series). Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 100-123.
  31. Thomas Reid's Philosophy of Mind: Consciousness and Intentionality.Rebecca Copenhaver - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (3):279-289.
    Thomas Reid’s epistemological ambitions are decisively at the center of his work. However, if we take such ambitions to be the whole story, we are apt to overlook the theory of mind that Reid develops and deploys against the theory of ideas. Reid’s philosophy of mind is sophisticated and strikingly contemporary, and has, until recently, been lost in the shadow of his other philosophical accomplishments. Here I survey some aspects of Reid’s theory of mind that I (...)
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  32. Perceiving Bodies Immediately: Thomas Reid's Insight.Marina Folescu - 2015 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 32 (1):19-36.
    In An Inquiry into the Human Mind and in Essays on Intellectual Powers, Thomas Reid discusses what kinds of things perceivers are related to in perception. Are these things qualities of bodies, the bodies themselves, or both? This question places him in a long tradition of philosophers concerned with understanding how human perception works in connecting us with the external world. It is still an open question in the philosophy of perception whether the human perceptual system is providing us (...)
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  33. Reid’s Direct Realism and Visible Figure.Keith A. Wilson - 2013 - Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):783-803.
    In his account of visual perception, Thomas Reid describes visible figure as both ‘real and external’ to the eye and as the ‘immediate object of sight’. These claims appear to conflict with Reid's direct realism, since if the ‘immediate’ object of vision is also its direct object, then sight would be perceptually indirect due to the role of visible figure as a perceptual intermediary. I argue that this apparent threat to Reid's direct realism may be resolved by (...)
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  34.  76
    Reid’s View of Memorial Conception.Marina Folescu - 2018 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 16 (3):211-226.
    Thomas Reid believed that the human mind is well equipped, from infancy, to acquire knowledge of the external world, with all its objects, persons and events. There are three main faculties that are involved in the acquisition of knowledge: (original) perception, memory, and imagination. It is thought that we cannot understand how exactly perception works, unless we have a good grasp on Reid’s notion of perceptual conception (i.e., of the conception employed in perception). The present paper argues that (...)
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  35. Conceiving Without Concepts: Reid Vs. The Way of Ideas.Lewis Powell - 2013 - ProtoSociology 30:221-237.
    Thomas Reid is notorious for rejecting the orthodox theory of conception (OTC), according to which conceiving of an object involves a mental relationship to an idea of that object. In this paper, I examine the question of what this rejection amounts to, when we limit our attention to bare conception (rather than the more widely discussed case of perception). I present some of the purported advantages of OTC, and assess whether they provide a genuine basis for preferring OTC to (...)
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  36. La teoria della memoria di Reid in contesto.Andrea Guardo - 2013 - In Saggio sulla memoria. Milano-Udine: Mimesis. pp. 15-36.
    An introduction to Thomas Reid’s epistemology and philosophy of mind, written for the Italian translation of his essay on memory.
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  37.  7
    Reid and Berkeley on Scepticism, Representationalism, and Ideas.Peter West - 2019 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 17 (3):191-210.
    Both Reid and Berkeley reject ‘representationalism’, an epistemological position whereby we perceive things in the world indirectly via ideas in our mind, on the grounds of anti-scepticism and common sense. My aim in this paper is to draw out the similarities between Reid and Berkeley's ‘anti-representationalist’ arguments, whilst also identifying the root of their disagreements on certain fundamental metaphysical issues. Reid famously rejects Berkeley's idealism, in which all that exists are ideas and minds, because it undermines the (...)
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  38.  79
    Thinking About Different Nonexistents of the Same Kind: Reid's Account of the Imagination and its Nonexistent Objects.Marina Folescu - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 93 (3):627-649.
    How is it that, as fiction readers, we are nonplussed by J. K. Rowling's prescription to imagine Ronan, Bane, and Magorian, three different centaurs of the Forbidden Forrest at Hogwarts? It is usually held in the philosophical literature on fictional discourse that singular imaginings of fictional objects are impossible, given the blatant nonexistence of such objects. In this paper, I have a dual purpose: on the one hand, to show that, without being committed to Meinongeanism, we can explain the phenomenon (...)
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  39.  59
    Locke, Hume, and Reid on the Objects of Belief.Lewis Powell - 2018 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 35 (1):21-38.
    The goal of this paper is show how an initially appealing objection to David Hume's account of judgment can only be put forward by philosophers who accept an account of judgment that has its own sizable share of problems. To demonstrate this, I situate the views of John Locke, David Hume, and Thomas Reid with respect to each other, so as to illustrate how the appealing objection is linked to unappealing features of Locke's account of judgment.
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  40. Reid's Discovery of the Sense of Balance.David Vender - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Thought 3:23 - 40.
    The sense of balance remains a Cinderella among our senses. Although the vestibular apparatus and the apprehension of motion, equilibrium and orientation which it serves has now been studied extensively and descriptions abound in textbooks on perceptual psychology, its key role in our agency remains neglected in philosophical accounts of perception. Popularly received wisdom on the senses also largely ignores balance and it has recently even been called 'the lost sense'. -/- Recognition for the discovery of this sense should probably (...)
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  41. Reid's Foundation for the Primary/Secondary Quality Distinction.Jennifer McKitrick - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (209):478-494.
    Reid offers an under-appreciated account of the primary/secondary quality distinction. He gives sound reasons for rejecting the views of Locke, Boyle, Galileo and others, and presents a better alternative, according to which the distinction is epistemic rather than metaphysical. Primary qualities, for Reid, are qualities whose intrinsic natures can be known through sensation. Secondary qualities, on the other hand, are unknown causes of sensations. Some may object that Reid's view is internally inconsistent, or unacceptably relativistic. However, a (...)
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  42. Semiotic and Significs the Correspondence Between Charles S. Peirce and Lady Victoria Welby.Victoria Welby & Charles S. Peirce - 1977
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  43.  38
    Conventionalism In Reid’s ‘Geometry Of Visibles’.Edward Slowik - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (3):467-489.
    The subject of this investigation is the role of conventions in the formulation of Thomas Reid’s theory of the geometry of vision, which he calls the ‘geometry of visibles’. In particular, we will examine the work of N. Daniels and R. Angell who have alleged that, respectively, Reid’s ‘geometry of visibles’ and the geometry of the visual field are non-Euclidean. As will be demonstrated, however, the construction of any geometry of vision is subject to a choice of conventions (...)
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  44.  25
    Reid’s Account of the “Geometry of Visibles”: Some Lessons From Helmholtz.Lorne Falkenstein - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):485-510.
    Drawing on work done by Helmholtz, I argue that Reid was in no position to infer that objects appear as if projected on the inner surface of a sphere, or that they have the geometric properties of such projections even though they do not look concave towards the eye. A careful consideration of the phenomena of visual experience, as further illuminated by the practice of visual artists, should have led him to conclude that the sides of visible appearances either (...)
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  45.  19
    A Critique of Victoria S. Harrison’s Internal Realist Approach to Pluralism.Daniele Bertini - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (4):1053-1068.
    Victoria S. Harrison’s theory of internal pluralism approaches religious beliefs in terms of conceptual schemes. To her, this approach has the advantage of preserving core pluralist intuitions without being challenged by the usual difficulties. My claim is that this is not the case. After providing a succinct presentation of internal pluralism, I show that the critique of traditional pluralist views such as Hick’s may also be addressed to Harrison. There are two main reasons in support of my claim. Firstly, (...)
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  46. Reid and Wells on Single and Double Vision.Giovanni B. Grandi - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Thought 3:143-163.
    In a recent article on Reid’s theory of single and double vision, James Van Cleve considers an argument against direct realism presented by Hume. Hume argues for the mind-dependent nature of the objects of our perception from the phenomenon of double vision. Reid does not address this particular argument, but Van Cleve considers possible answers Reid might have given to Hume. He finds fault with all these answers. Against Van Cleve, I argue that both appearances in double (...)
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  47.  89
    Re-Evaluating Reid's Response to Skepticism.Blake McAllister - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (3):317-339.
    I argue that some of the most prominent interpretations of Reid's response to skepticism marginalize a crucial aspect of his thought: namely, that our common sense beliefs meet whatever normative standards of rationality the skeptic might fairly demand of them. This should be seen as supplementary to reliabilist or proper functionalist interpretations of Reid, which often ignore this half of the story. I also show how Reid defends the rationality of believing first principles by appealing to their (...)
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  48.  70
    'Scottish Commonsense' About Memory: A Defence of Thomas Reid's Direct Knowledge Account.Andy Hamilton - 2003 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):229-245.
    Reid rejects the image theory --the representative or indirect realist position--that memory-judgements are inferred from or otherwise justified by a present image or introspectible state. He also rejects the trace theory , which regards memories as essentially traces in the brain. In contrast he argues for a direct knowledge account in which personal memory yields unmediated knowledge of the past. He asserts the reliability of memory, not in currently fashionable terms as a reliable belief-forming process, but more elusively as (...)
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  49. Thomas Reid on Molyneux's Question.Robert Hopkins - 2005 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (3):340-364.
    Reid’s discussion of Molyneux’s question has been neglected. The Inquiry discusses the question twice, offering opposing answers. The first discussion treats the underlying issue as concerning common perceptibles of touch and vision, and in particular whether in vision we originally perceive depth. Although it is tempting to treat the second discussion as doing the same, this would render pointless various novel features Reid introduces in reformulating Molyneux’s question. Rather, the issue now is whether the blind can form a (...)
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  50. Is Balancing Emblematic of Action? Two or Three Pointers From Reid and Peirce.David Vender - 2011 - Humana Mente 4 (15):251-270.
    Defining actions in contradistinction to mere happenings runs into the problem of specifying the role of the agent and separating what the agent does from what they exploit or suffer. Traditionally these problems have been approached by starting with a simple act, such as an incidental movement, and considering causality, or by seeking to elucidate the connection between the act and the agent's intentions or reasons. It is suggested here that a promising approach is to shift attention from 'simple' movements (...)
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