Results for 'Video games Social aspects'

999 found
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  1.  28
    Applying Aspects of the Expert Performance Approach to Better Understand the Structure of Skill and Mechanisms of Skill Acquisition in Video Games.Walter R. Boot, Anna Sumner, Tyler J. Towne, Paola Rodriguez & K. Anders Ericsson - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (2):413-436.
    Video games are ideal platforms for the study of skill acquisition for a variety of reasons. However, our understanding of the development of skill and the cognitive representations that support skilled performance can be limited by a focus on game scores. We present an alternative approach to the study of skill acquisition in video games based on the tools of the Expert Performance Approach. Our investigation was motivated by a detailed analysis of the behaviors responsible for (...)
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  2.  26
    Applying Aspects of the Expert Performance Approach to Better Understand the Structure of Skill and Mechanisms of Skill Acquisition in Video Games.Walter R. Boot, Anna Sumner, Tyler J. Towne, Paola Rodriguez & K. Anders Ericsson - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4).
    Video games are ideal platforms for the study of skill acquisition for a variety of reasons. However, our understanding of the development of skill and the cognitive representations that support skilled performance can be limited by a focus on game scores. We present an alternative approach to the study of skill acquisition in video games based on the tools of the Expert Performance Approach. Our investigation was motivated by a detailed analysis of the behaviors responsible for (...)
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  3.  30
    Reviewing Games of Empire: Global Capitalism and Video Games.Simon Ferrari & Ian Bogost - 2013 - Continent 3 (1):50-52.
    Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter. Games of Empire: Global Capitalism and Video Games . Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2009. 320pp. pbk. $19.95 ISBN-13: 978-0816666119. In Games of Empire , Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter expand an earlier study of “the video game industry as an aspect of an emerging postindustrial, post-Fordist capitalism” (xxix) to argue that videogames are “exemplary media of Empire” (xxix). Their notion of “Empire” is based on Michael Hardt and (...)
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  4. The Art of Videogames.Grant Tavinor - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    The new art of videogames -- What are videogames anyway? -- On definition -- Theories of gaming -- A definition of videogames -- Videogames and fiction -- From tennis for two to worlds of warcraft -- Imaginary worlds and works of fiction -- Fictional or virtual? -- Interactive fiction -- Stepping into fictional worlds -- Welcome to rapture -- Meet niko bellic -- Experiencing game worlds -- Acting in game worlds -- Games through fiction -- The nature of gaming (...)
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  5. Video Games and Ethics.Monique Wonderly - 2017 - In Joseph C. Pitt & Ashley Shew (eds.), Spaces for the Future: A Companion to Philosophy of Technology. New York, USA: Routledge.
    Historically, video games featuring content perceived as excessively violent have drawn moral criticism from an indignant (and sometimes, morally outraged) public. Defenders of violent video games have insisted that such criticisms are unwarranted, as committing acts of virtual violence against computer-controlled characters – no matter how heinous or cruel those actions would be if performed in real life – harm no actual people. In this paper, I present and critically analyze key aspects of this debate. (...)
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  6. Computing Machinery and Emergence: The Aesthetics and Metaphysics of Video Games.Jon Cogburn & Mark Silcox - 2004 - Minds and Machines 15 (1):73-89.
    We build on some of Daniel Dennett’s ideas about predictive indispensability to characterize properties of video games discernable by people as computationally emergent if, and only if: (1) they can be instantiated by a computing machine, and (2) there is no algorithm for detecting instantiations of them. We then use this conception of emergence to provide support to the aesthetic ideas of Stanley Fish and to illuminate some aspects of the Chomskyan program in cognitive science.
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  7. The Incorrigible Social Meaning of Video Game Imagery.Stephanie Patridge - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (4):303-312.
    In this paper, I consider a particular amoralist challenge against those who would morally criticize our single-player video play, viz., “come on, it’s only a game!” The amoralist challenge with which I engage gains strength from two facts: the activities to which the amoralist lays claim are only those that do not involve interactions with other rational or sentient creatures, and the amoralist concedes that there may be extrinsic, consequentialist considerations that support legitimate moral criticisms. I argue that the (...)
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  8.  39
    Games 2.0 Jako Próba Konstrukcji Społeczno-Kulturowego Perpetuum Mobile.Andrzej Klimczuk - 2008 - Homo Communicativus 5:177--187.
    Increase in popularity of games like "Second Life" has contributed not only to significant changes in the development of the electronic entertainment industry. Promoting Games 2.0, the new trend of video game production that are assumed to be the virtual worlds that contain user-generated content makes both measured with a specific technological innovation, as well as a serious change in the organization of socio-cultural heritage. The article presents problems of the existing difficulties of terminology, the implications of (...)
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  9. The Invisible Hand in Virtual Worlds: The Economic Order of Video Games.Matthew McCaffrey (ed.) - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    Video games aren't merely casual entertainment: they are the heart of one of the fastest-growing media industries in the world, and a cultural phenomenon in their own right. Gaming has evolved from a niche pastime into a global business that rivals film and television, creating, in the process, new art forms and social arenas and have become the subject of endless public debate. This book shows that games also provide a unique space in which to study (...)
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  10.  35
    Social Context in Massively-Multiplayer Online Games (MMOGs): Ethical Questions in Shared Space.Dorothy E. Warner & Mike Raiter - 2005 - International Review of Information Ethics 4 (7):46-52.
    Computer and video games have become nearly ubiquitous among individuals in industrialized nations, and they have received increasing attention from researchers across many areas of scientific study. However, relatively little attention has been given to Massively-Multiplayer Online Games . The unique social context of MMOGs raises ethical questions about how communication occurs and how conflict is managed in the game world. In order to explore these questions, we compare the social context in Blizzard’s World of (...)
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  11.  88
    The Camera Never Lies: Social Construction of Self and Group in Video, Film, and Photography. [REVIEW]Jo Ann Oravec - 1995 - Journal of Value Inquiry 29 (4):431-446.
    Construction of self and group often incorporates the use of objects associated with "expression," including videos, films, and photographs. In this article, I describe four different sites for construction of groups (group portraiture, courtrooms, video-assisted group therapy, and videoconferencing). I discuss potential aspects of shifts in the way we use and talk about media on what it is like to participate in a group. The eras of video, film, and photography as "silent witnesses" to group interaction are (...)
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  12.  82
    The Ethics of Computer Games.Miguel Sicart - 2009 - MIT Press.
    Why computer games can be ethical, how players use their ethical values in gameplay, and the implications for game design.
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  13.  34
    Game Cultures: Computer Games as New Media.Jon Dovey - 2006 - Open University Press.
    This book introduces the critical concepts and debates that are shaping the emerging field of game studies. Exploring games in the context of cultural studies and media studies, it analyses computer games as the most popular contemporary form of new media production and consumption. The book: Argues for the centrality of play in redefining reading, consuming and creating culture Offers detailed research into the political economy of games to generate a model of new media production Examines the (...)
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  14. Video Games as Self‐Involving Interactive Fictions.Jon Robson & Aaron Meskin - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):165-177.
    This article explores the nature and theoretical import of a hitherto neglected class of fictions which we term ‘self-involving interactive fictions’. SIIFs are interactive fictions, but they differ from standard examples of interactive fictions by being, in some important sense, about those who consume them. In order to better understand the nature of SIIFs, and the ways in which they differ from other fictions, we focus primarily on the most prominent example of the category: video-game fictions. We argue that (...)
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  15.  50
    Zastosowanie Koncepcji Kapitału Społecznego W Badaniach Ludologicznych. Przykład Branży Gier Komputerowych.Andrzej Klimczuk - 2010 - Homo Ludens 2:51--59.
    More and more people around the world are using computer (video) games. The development of the gaming industry means increasing of its complexity in all aspects. Not only is the content represented in games continuously differentiating, but we also see the increasing diversity among their creators, users, researchers and the public. This article aims to draw attention to the possibility of using the concept of social capital in ludologists’ research as well as in improving the (...)
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  16. Are Video Games Art?Aaron Smuts - 2005 - Contemporary Aesthetics 3.
    I argue that by any major definition of art many modern video games should be considered art. Rather than defining art and defending video games based on a single contentious definition, I offer reasons for thinking that video games can be art according to historical, aesthetic, institutional, representational and expressive theories of art. Overall, I argue that while many video games probably should not be considered art, there are good reasons to think (...)
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  17. Philosophy Through Video Games.Jon Cogburn - 2008 - Routledge.
    I, player : the puzzle of personal identity (MMORPGS and Virtual Communities) -- The game inside the mind, the mind inside the game (The Nintendo Wii Gaming Console) -- Realistic blood and gore : do violent games make violent gamers? (First-person Shooters) -- Games and God's goodness (World-builder and Tycoon Games) -- The metaphysics of interactive art (Puzzle and Adventure Games) -- Artificial and human intelligence (Single-player RPGS) -- Epilogue: Video games and the meaning (...)
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  18. Locating the Wrongness in Ultra-Violent Video Games.David I. Waddington - 2007 - Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):121-128.
    The extremely high level of simulated violence in certain recent video games has made some people uneasy. There is a concern that something is wrong with these violent games, but, since the violence is virtual rather than real, it is difficult to specify the nature of the wrongness. Since there is no proven causal connection between video-game violence and real violence, philosophical analysis can be particularly helpful in locating potential sources of wrongness in ultra-violent video (...)
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  19. A Humean Approach to Assessing the Moral Significance of Ultra-Violent Video Games.Monique Wonderly - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):1-10.
    Although the word empathy only recently came into existence, eighteenth century philosopher, David Hume, significantly contributed to our current understanding of the term. Hume was among the first to suggest that an empathic mechanism is the central means by which we make ethical judgments and glean moral knowledge. In this paper, I explore Hume's moral sentimentalism, and I argue that his conception of empathy provides a surprisingly apposite framework for interpreting and addressing a current issue in practical ethics: the moral (...)
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  20. Video Games and the Philosophy of Art.Aaron Smuts - 2005 - American Society for Aesthetics Newsletter.
    The most cursory look at video games raises several interesting issues that have yet to receive any consideration in the philosophy of art, such as: Are videogames art and, if so, what kind of art are they? Are they more closely related to film, or are they similar to performance arts, such as dance? Perhaps they are more akin to competitive sports and games like diving and chess? Can we even define “video game” or “game”? We (...)
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  21. Simulating Philosophy: Interpreting Video Games as Executable Thought Experiments. [REVIEW]Marcus Schulzke - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):251-265.
    This essay proposes an alternative way of studying video games: as thought experiments akin to the narrative thought experiments that are frequently used in philosophy. This perspective incorporates insights from the narratological and ludological perspectives in game studies and highlights the philosophical significance of games. Video game thought experiments are similar to narrative thought experiments in many respects and can perform the same functions. They also have distinctive advantages over narrative thought experiments, as they situate counterfactuals (...)
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  22. Film Theory Meets Video Games: An Analysis of the Issues and Methodologies in 'ScreenPlay'. [REVIEW]Aaron Smuts - 2003 - Film-Philosophy 7 (7).
    "ScreenPlay" is the first collection of essays devoted to exploring the relationship between cinema and video games. It attempts to introduce the field of video game studies while also increasing our understanding of the two artforms. Although not all of the essays are models of clear thinking on the subject, the volume will be a valuable resource for those working in film, philosophy, new media, and video game studies. Geoff King and Tanya Krzywinska have brought together (...)
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  23.  70
    Powerplay — Power, Violence and Gender in Video Games.Gitte Jantzen & Jans F. Jensen - 1993 - AI and Society 7 (4):368-385.
    Unlike the bulk of electronic media the computer game or video game is a distinctly gendered medium. All investigations confirm that we are dealing with a medium which almost exclusively appeals to and is used by, boys and young men. Therefore, the video games and computer games are very suited for investigating the form of entertainment, the pleasure, that appeals to men, i.e. the specific ‘masculine pleasure’.The paper deals with questions such as: What do computer (...) mean? What does violence in computer games signify? Why do computer games, especially the violent ones, mean something special to a certain group of men? These questions are discussed from the perspective of semiotics, media and control studies.Finally, the paper discusses the connections between women and the male dominated video games, and attempts to explain why, nevertheless, some girls and women do play these games. (shrink)
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  24.  39
    Musical Ecologies in Video Games.Michiel Kamp - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):235-249.
    What makes video games unique as an audiovisual medium is not just that they are interactive, but that this interactivity is rule bound and goal oriented. This means that player experience, including experience of the music, is somehow shaped or structured by these characteristics. Because of its emphasis on action in perception, James Gibson’s ecological approach to psychology—particularly his concept of affordances—is well suited to theorise the role of music in player experience. In a game, players perceive the (...)
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  25.  31
    Video Games, Violence, and the Ethics of Fantasy: Killing Time.Christopher Bartel - forthcoming - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Is it ever morally wrong to enjoy fantasizing about immoral things? Many video games allow players to commit numerous violent and immoral acts. But, should players worry about the morality of their virtual actions? A common argument is that games offer merely the virtual representation of violence. No one is actually harmed by committing a violent act in a game. So, it cannot be morally wrong to perform such acts. While this is an intuitive argument, it does (...)
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  26.  12
    Intertextualités : jeu vidéo, littérature, cinéma, bande dessinée.Yves Chevaldonn - 2012 - Hermès: La Revue Cognition, communication, politique 62 (1):, [ p.].
    L’évolution de la littérature, du cinéma, de la bande dessinée et des jeux vidéo tend de plus en plus vers une convergence, aussi bien sur le plan économique que sur le plan artistique . Nous proposons ici d’étudier cette convergence, autour de mondes imaginaires , et selon trois approches : le système de production, les représentations véhiculées et l’esthétique.Changing trends in literature, film, comics and video games are tending towards convergence, both in economic terms and artistically . Here (...)
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  27.  30
    Gry Komputerowe I Branża Gier a Sztuka Komiksowa.Andrzej Klimczuk - 2011 - In Grażyna Gajewska & Rafał Wójcik (eds.), Contextual Mix. Through Graphic Stories to Analyses of Contemporary Culture. Poznańskie Towarzystwo Przyjaciół Nauk. pp. 385--396.
    Growth in popularity of computer games is a noticeable change in recent years. Electronic entertainment increasingly engages the wider society and reaches to new audiences by offering them satisfy of wide variety of needs and aspirations. As a mass media games not only provide entertainment, but they are also an important source of income, knowledge and social problems. Article aims to bring closer look on the common areas of games and comics. On the one hand designers (...)
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  28. Children, Technology and Culture: The Impacts of Technologies in Children's Everyday Lives.Ian Hutchby & Jo Moran-Ellis - 2001 - Routledge.
    Childhood is increasingly saturated by technology: from television to the Internet, video games to 'video nasties', camcorders to personal computers. _Children, Technology and Culture_ looks at the interplay of children and technology which poses critical questions for how we understand the nature of childhood in late modern society. This collection brings together researchers from a range of disciplines to address the following four aspects of this relationship between children and technology: *children's access to technologies and the (...)
     
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  29.  29
    The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development.Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  30.  32
    The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development.Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  31.  36
    Social Responsibility and the Olympic Games: The Mediating Role of Consumer Attributions. [REVIEW]Matthew Walker, Bob Heere, Milena M. Parent & Dan Drane - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):659 - 680.
    Current literature suggests that corporate social responsibility (CSR) can affect consumers' attitudes towards an organization and is regarded as a driver for reputation-building and fostering sustained consumer patronage. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of CSR on consumer responses, this research examined the mediating influence of consumer's perceived organizational motives within an NGO setting.Given the heightened public attention surrounding the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, data were collected from consumers of the Games to assess their perceptions (...)
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  32. Pornography, Ethics, and Video Games.Stephanie L. Patridge - 2013 - Ethics and Information Technology 15 (1):25-34.
    In a recent and provocative essay, Christopher Bartel attempts to resolve the gamer’s dilemma. The dilemma, formulated by Morgan Luck, goes as follows: there is no principled distinction between virtual murder and virtual pedophilia. So, we’ll have to give up either our intuition that virtual murder is morally permissible—seemingly leaving us over-moralizing our gameplay—or our intuition that acts of virtual pedophilia are morally troubling—seemingly leaving us under-moralizing our game play. Bartel’s attempted resolution relies on establishing the following three theses: (1) (...)
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  33. Free Will and Moral Responsibility in Video Games.Christopher Bartel - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (4):285-293.
    Can a player be held morally responsible for the choices that she makes within a videogame? Do the moral choices that the player makes reflect in any way on the player’s actual moral sensibilities? Many videogames offer players the options to make numerous choices within the game, including moral choices. But the scope of these choices is quite limited. I attempt to analyze these issues by drawing on philosophical debates about the nature of free will. Many philosophers worry that, if (...)
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  34.  14
    Medical, Social and Christian Aspects in Patients with Major Lower Limb Amputations.Bogdan Stancu, Georgel Rednic, Nicolae Ovidiu Grad, Ion Aurel Mironiuc & Claudia Diana Gherman - 2016 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 15 (43):82-101.
    Lower limb major amputations are both life-saving procedures and life-changing events. Individual responses to limb loss are varied and complex, some individuals experience functional, psychological and social dysfunction, many others adjust and function well. Some patients refuse amputation for religious and/or cultural reasons. One of the greatest difficulties for a person undergoing amputation surgery is overcoming the psychological stigma that society associates with the loss of a limb. Persons who have undergone amputations are often viewed as incomplete individuals. The (...)
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  35.  79
    Video Games and Virtual Reality.Robert Seddon - 2017 - In Anthony F. Beavers (ed.), Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks: Philosophy: Technology. Macmillan Reference USA. pp. 191-216.
  36.  36
    Narrative Technologies: A Philosophical Investigation of the Narrative Capacities of Technologies by Using Ricoeur’s Narrative Theory.Mark Coeckelbergh & Wessel Reijers - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (3):325-346.
    Contemporary philosophy of technology, in particular mediation theory, has largely neglected language and has paid little attention to the social-linguistic environment in which technologies are used. In order to reintroduce and strengthen these two missing aspects we turn towards Ricoeur’s narrative theory. We argue that technologies have a narrative capacity: not only do humans make sense of technologies by means of narratives but technologies themselves co-constitute narratives and our understanding of these narratives by configuring characters and events in (...)
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  37. Towards a Science of Emerging Media.Barry Smith - 2015 - In J. E. Katz & J. Floyd (eds.), Philosophy of Emerging Media: Understanding, Appreciation and Application. Oxford University Press. pp. 29-48.
    If media studies are to become established as a genuine science, then it needs to be determined what the subject matter of this science is to be. I propose a specification of this subject matter as consisting in: 1. the new sorts of digital entities that have been added to social reality through the invention of the digital computer, and 2. the new sorts of interactions involving human beings which such entities make possible. I support this proposal by examining (...)
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  38. Defending the Morality of Violent Video Games.Marcus Schulzke - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (2):127-138.
    The effect of violent video games is among the most widely discussed topics in media studies, and for good reason. These games are immensely popular, but many seem morally objectionable. Critics attack them for a number of reasons ranging from their capacity to teach players weapons skills to their ability to directly cause violent actions. This essay shows that many of these criticisms are misguided. Theoretical and empirical arguments against violent video games often suffer from (...)
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  39.  22
    Who is Down on the Farm? Social Aspects of Australian Agriculture in the 21st Century.Margaret Alston - 2004 - Agriculture and Human Values 21 (1):37-46.
    Globalization, international policymanipulations such as the US farm bill, andnational policy responses have received a greatdeal of media coverage in recent times. Theseinternational and national events are having amajor impact on agricultural production inAustralia. There is some suggestion that theyare, in fact, responsible for a downturn in thefortunes of agriculture. Yet, it is more likelythat these issues are acting to continue andexacerbate a trend towards reduced viabilityfor farm families evident in economic andsocial trends since at least the 1950s.Nevertheless, globalization and (...)
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  40. The Problem of Evil in Virtual Worlds.Brendan Shea - 2017 - In Mark Silcox (ed.), Experience Machines: The Philosophy of Virtual Worlds. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 137-155.
    In its original form, Nozick’s experience machine serves as a potent counterexample to a simplistic form of hedonism. The pleasurable life offered by the experience machine, its seems safe to say, lacks the requisite depth that many of us find necessary to lead a genuinely worthwhile life. Among other things, the experience machine offers no opportunities to establish meaningful relationships, or to engage in long-term artistic, intellectual, or political projects that survive one’s death. This intuitive objection finds some support in (...)
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  41.  75
    Video Games as Self-Involving Interactive Fictions.Jon Robson & Aaron Meskin - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):165-177.
    This article explores the nature and theoretical import of a hitherto neglected class of fictions which we term ‘self-involving interactive fictions’. SIIFs are interactive fictions, but they differ from standard examples of interactive fictions by being, in some important sense, about those who consume them. In order to better understand the nature of SIIFs, and the ways in which they differ from other fictions, we focus primarily on the most prominent example of the category: video-game fictions. We argue that (...)
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  42. Augmented Ontologies or How to Philosophize with a Digital Hammer.Stefano Gualeni - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):177-199.
    Could a person ever transcend what it is like to be in the world as a human being? Could we ever know what it is like to be other creatures? Questions about the overcoming of a human perspective are not uncommon in the history of philosophy. In the last century, those very interrogatives were notably raised by American philosopher Thomas Nagel in the context of philosophy of mind. In his 1974 essay What is it Like to Be a Bat?, Nagel (...)
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  43.  32
    Digitalizing Historical Consciousness.Claudio Fogu - 2009 - History and Theory 48 (2):103-121.
    What is a “historical” video game, let alone a successful one? It is difficult to answer this question because all our definitions of history have been constructed in a linear-narrative cultural context that is currently being challenged and in large part displaced by digital media, especially video games. I therefore consider this question from the point of view of historical semantics and in relation to the impact of digital technology on all aspects of the historiographical operation, (...)
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  44.  11
    Militainment and Mechatronics: Occultatio and the Veil of Science Fiction Cool in United States Air Force Advertisements. [REVIEW]Nicholas R. Maradin Iii - 2013 - Ethics and Information Technology 15 (2):77-86.
    In 2009, the United States Air Force aired a series of science fiction-themed recruitment commercials on network television and their official YouTube channel. In these advertisements, the superimposition of science fiction imagery over depictions of Air Force operations frames these missions as near-future sci-fi adventure, ironically summarized by the tagline: “It’s not science fiction. It’s what we do every day.” Focusing on an early advertisement for the Air Force’s Reaper unmanned aerial vehicle, this essay explores how themes essential to the (...)
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  45. Is It Wrong to Play Violent Video Games?McCormick Matt - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (4):277–287.
    Many people have a strong intuition that there is something morally objectionable about playing violent video games, particularly with increases in the number of people who are playing them and the games' alleged contribution to some highly publicized crimes. In this paper,I use the framework of utilitarian, deontological, and virtue ethical theories to analyze the possibility that there might be some philosophical foundation for these intuitions. I raise the broader question of whether or not participating in authentic (...)
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  46.  13
    Looking at the Social Aspects of Nature of Science in Science Education Through a New Lens.Sila Kaya, Sibel Erduran, Naomi Birdthistle & Orla McCormack - 2018 - Science & Education 27 (5-6):457-478.
    Particular social aspects of the nature of science, such as economics of, and entrepreneurship in science, are understudied in science education research. It is not surprising then that the practical applications, such as lesson resources and teaching materials, are scarce. The key aims of this article are to synthesize perspectives from the literature on economics of science, entrepreneurship, NOS, and science education in order to have a better understanding of how science works in society and illustrate how such (...)
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  47.  27
    EPIC: A Framework for Using Video Games in Ethics Education.Karen Schrier - 2015 - Journal of Moral Education 44 (4):393-424.
    Ethics education can potentially be supplemented through the use of video games. This article proposes a novel framework, which helps educators choose games to be used for ethics education purposes. The EPIC Framework is derived from a number of classic moral development, learning, and ethical decision-making models, including frameworks and theories associated with games and ethics, as well as prior empirical and theoretical research literature. The EPIC Framework consists of seven ethics education goals, and 12 strategies (...)
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  48.  38
    What's My Motivation? Video Games and Interpretative Performance.Grant Tavinor - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):23-33.
    The interpretation of character motivations is a crucial part of the understanding of many narratives, including those found in video games. This interpretation can be complicated in video games by the player performing the role of a player-character within the game narrative. Such performance finds the player making choices for the character and also interpreting the resulting character actions and their effect on the game's narrative. This can lead to interpretative difficulties for game narratives and their (...)
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    Violent Video Games and Morality: A Meta-Ethical Approach.Garry Young - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (4):311-321.
    This paper considers what it is about violent video games that leads one reasonably minded person to declare “That is immoral” while another denies it. Three interpretations of video game content are discussed: reductionist, narrow, and broad. It is argued that a broad interpretation is required for a moral objection to be justified. It is further argued that understanding the meaning of moral utterances—like “x is immoral”—is important to an understanding of why there is a lack of (...)
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  50. Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques.Francois Berger, Sjef Gevers, Ludwig Siep & Klaus-Michael Weltring - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (3):241-249.
    Nanotechnology is an important platform technology which will add new features like improved biocompatibility, smaller size, and more sophisticated electronics to neuro-implants improving their therapeutic potential. Especially in view of possible advantages for patients, research and development of nanotechnologically improved neuro implants is a moral obligation. However, the development of brain implants by itself touches many ethical, social and legal issues, which also apply in a specific way to devices enabled or improved by nanotechnology. For researchers developing nanotechnology such (...)
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