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Vikas Baniwal
University of Delhi
  1.  7
    National Consultation on University and College Counselling Services in India: Key Recommendations.Vikas Baniwal & Anshu - 2016 - Indian Journal of School Health and Wellbeing 2 (3):1-8.
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  2.  11
    Reconsidering Buber, Educational Technology, and the Expansion of Dialogic Space.Vikas Baniwal - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (1):121-127.
    This paper is an attempt to further the conversation about the possibilities of dialogue with technology that Wegerif and Major have initiated. In their paper Wegerif and Major have argued that “constructive dialogue with technology is possible, even essential, and that this takes the form of opening a dialogic space” and they also “argue against Buber that dialogic spaces do not all take the same form, but that they take a multitude of forms depending, to a large extent, on the (...)
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    A Response to Jane Sahi's 'Dialogue as Education: Martin Buber'.Vikas Baniwal - 2014 - Contemporary Education Dialogue 11 (2):179–195.
    This article is inspired by Jane Sahi’s commentary, ‘Dialogue as Education: Martin Buber’, published under the feature ‘Classics with Commentary’ in the Monsoon 2005 issue of Contemporary Education Dialogue. I seek to further the discussion of the contributions of Martin Buber to the discourse of education through an elaboration and clarification of the ideas, concerns and critiques exposited by Jane Sahi. -/- These concerns can perhaps be understood under the following themes: (i) reflections on educational practice in the light of (...)
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  4. Towards the Holistic Development of a Child: Some Reflections From the Writings of Tagore, Aurobindo and Krishnamurti.Vikas Baniwal - 2016 - Indian Journal of School Health and Wellbeing 2 (2):35-41.
    This paper attempts to explicate the ways in which three important Indian thinkers- Tagore, Sri Aurobindo, and Krishnamurti understand the holistic development of a child. These thinkers become even more important in light of the fact that with periodic changes in the education policies of the state, and the changing view of how a child’s development in school is visualised, the thoughts of these thinkers have, in a sense, remained eternal and have continued to inspire schools and find expression. Their (...)
     
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