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Vikki A. Entwistle [9]Vikki Ann Entwistle [1]
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Vikki Entwistle
University of Aberdeen
  1.  44
    Treating Patients as Persons: A Capabilities Approach to Support Delivery of Person-Centered Care.Vikki A. Entwistle & Ian S. Watt - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (8):29-39.
    Health services internationally struggle to ensure health care is ?person-centered? (or similar). In part, this is because there are many interpretations of ?person-centered care? (and near synonyms), some of which seem unrealistic for some patients or situations and obscure the intrinsic value of patients? experiences of health care delivery. The general concern behind calls for person-centered care is an ethical one: Patients should be ?treated as persons.? We made novel use of insights from the capabilities approach to characterize person-centered care (...)
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  2.  2
    Some Unresolved Ethical Challenges in Healthcare Decision-Making: Navigating Family Involvement.Sumytra Menon, Vikki A. Entwistle, Alastair V. Campbell & Johannes J. M. van Delden - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (1):27-36.
    Family involvement in healthcare decision-making for competent patients occurs to varying degrees in many communities around the world. There are different attitudes about who should make treatment decisions, how and why. Legal and professional ethics codes in most jurisdictions reflect and support the idea that competent patients should be enabled to make their own treatment decisions, even if others, including their healthcare professionals, disagree with them. This way of thinking contrasts with some cultural norms that put more emphasis on the (...)
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  3.  22
    Why Health and Social Care Support for People with Long-Term Conditions Should Be Oriented Towards Enabling Them to Live Well.Vikki A. Entwistle, Alan Cribb & John Owens - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):48-65.
    There are various reasons why efforts to promote “support for self-management” have rarely delivered the kinds of sustainable improvements in healthcare experiences, health and wellbeing that policy leaders internationally have hoped for. This paper explains how the basis of failure is in some respects built into the ideas that underpin many of these efforts. When support for self-management is narrowly oriented towards educating and motivating patients to adopt the behaviours recommended for disease control, it implicitly reflects and perpetuates limited and (...)
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  4.  21
    Ethical Issues Raised by Thyroid Cancer Overdiagnosis: A Matter for Public Health?Wendy A. Rogers, Wendy L. Craig & Vikki A. Entwistle - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (8):590-598.
    Current practices of identifying and treating small indolent thyroid cancers constitute an important but in some ways unusual form of overdiagnosis. Overdiagnosis refers to diagnoses that generally harm rather than benefit patients, primarily because the diagnosed condition is not a harmful form of disease. Patients who are overdiagnosed with thyroid cancer are harmed by the psycho-social impact of a cancer diagnosis, as well as treatment interventions such partial or total thyroidectomy, lifelong thyroid replacement hormone, monitoring, surgical complications and other side (...)
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  5.  24
    Addressing Deficits and Injustices: The Potential Epistemic Contributions of Patients to Research.Katrina Hutchison, Wendy Rogers & Vikki A. Entwistle - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (4):386-403.
    Patient or public involvement in health research is increasingly expected as a matter of policy. In theory, PPI can contribute both to the epistemic aims intrinsic to research, and to extrinsically valued features of research such as social inclusion and transparency. In practice, the aims of PPI have not always been clear, although there has been a tendency to encourage the involvement of so-called ordinary people who are regarded as representative of an assumed patient perspective. In this paper we focus (...)
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  6.  25
    Reframing the Debate Around State Responses to Infertility: Considering the Harms of Subfertility and Involuntary Childlessness.Rebecca C. H. Brown, Wendy A. Rogers, Vikki A. Entwistle & Siladitya Bhattacharya - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):290-300.
    Many countries are experiencing increasing levels of demand for access to assisted reproductive technologies. Policies regarding who can access ART and with what support from a collective purse are highly contested, raising questions about what state responses are justified. Whilst much of this debate has focused on the status of infertility as a disease, we argue that this is something of a distraction, since disease framing does not provide the far-reaching, robust justification for state support that proponents of ART seem (...)
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  7.  6
    Defining What is Good: Pluralism and Healthcare Quality.Polly Mitchell, Alan Cribb & Vikki A. Entwistle - 2020 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (4):367-388.
    'Quality' is a widely invoked concept in healthcare, and 'quality improvement' is now a central part of healthcare service delivery. However, these concepts and their associated practices represent relatively uncharted territory for applied philosophy and bioethics. In this paper, we explore some of the conceptual complexity of quality in healthcare and argue that quality is best understood to be conceptually plural. Quality is widely agreed to be multidimensional and as such constitutively plural. However, we argue that quality is plural in (...)
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  8.  11
    Risk, Overdiagnosis and Ethical Justifications.Wendy A. Rogers, Vikki A. Entwistle & Stacy M. Carter - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (4):231-248.
    Many healthcare practices expose people to risks of harmful outcomes. However, the major theories of moral philosophy struggle to assess whether, when and why it is ethically justifiable to expose individuals to risks, as opposed to actually harming them. Sven Ove Hansson has proposed an approach to the ethical assessment of risk imposition that encourages attention to factors including questions of justice in the distribution of advantage and risk, people’s acceptance or otherwise of risks, and the scope individuals have to (...)
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  9.  19
    Shared Health Governance: The Potential Danger of Oppressive “Healthism”.Stacy M. Carter, Vikki Ann Entwistle, Kirsten McCaffery & Lucie Rychetnik - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):57 - 59.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 7, Page 57-59, July 2011.
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  10.  16
    A Capabilities Approach to Person-Centered Care: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Treating Patients as Persons: A Capabilities Approach to Support Delivery of Person-Centered Care”.Vikki A. Entwistle & Ian S. Watt - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (8):W1 - W4.
    Health services internationally struggle to ensure health care is “person-centered”. In part, this is because there are many interpretations of “person-centered care”, some of which seem unrealistic for some patients or situations and obscure the intrinsic value of patients’ experiences of health care delivery. The general concern behind calls for person-centered care is an ethical one: Patients should be “treated as persons.” We made novel use of insights from the capabilities approach to characterize person-centered care as care that recognizes and (...)
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