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  1.  5
    The Rise of the Homme Machine: Carl Schmitt’s Critique of Biotechnology and Utopias.Ville Suuronen - 2019 - Political Theory:009059171989083.
    This essay argues that Carl Schmitt’s postwar writings offer an original critique of biotechnology and utopian thinking. Examining the classics of utopian literature from Plato to Thomas More and Aldous Huxley, Schmitt illustrates the rise of utopianism that aims to transform human nature and even produce an artificial “human-machine.” Schmitt discovers a counterimage to the emerging era of biotechnology from a katechontic form of Christianity and maintains that human beings must recognize their shared humanity in God, warning us that without (...)
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    Carl Schmitt as a theorist of the 1933 Nazi revolution: “The difficult task of rethinking and recultivating traditional concepts”.Ville Suuronen - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory:1-23.
    Carl Schmitt sees the 1933 Nazi seizure of power as a revolution that inaugurates an entirely new era of political-legal order. Analyzing Schmitt’s rarer Nazi-texts, diaries, and correspondence, I argue that from 1933 to 1936 Schmitt attempts to theorize the Nazi revolution by developing an entirely new political language of Nazism, cleansed from non-German ways of thinking, especially nineteenth-century liberalism. I focus on three conceptual transformations through which Schmitt understands the remaking of the German state: The shift from the liberal (...)
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    The Rise of the Homme Machine: Carl Schmitt’s Critique of Biotechnology and Utopias.Ville Suuronen - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (5):615-643.
    This essay argues that Carl Schmitt’s postwar writings offer an original critique of biotechnology and utopian thinking. Examining the classics of utopian literature from Plato to Thomas More and Aldous Huxley, Schmitt illustrates the rise of utopianism that aims to transform human nature and even produce an artificial “human-machine.” Schmitt discovers a counterimage to the emerging era of biotechnology from a katechontic form of Christianity and maintains that human beings must recognize their shared humanity in God, warning us that without (...)
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