10 found
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  1. Hope Lost, Hope Regained.Vincent Geoghegan - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (1):151-157.
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  2.  10
    Ernst Bloch.Vincent Geoghegan - 1996 - Routledge.
    Ernst Bloch is perhaps best known for his subtle and imaginative investigation of utopias and utpoianism, but his work also provides a comprehensive and insightful analysis of Western culture, politics and society. Yet, because he has not been one of the easiest writers to read, his full contribution has not been widely acknowledged. In this critical and accessible introduction to one of the most fascinating thinkers of the twentieth century, Vincent Geoghegan unravels much of the mystery of the man and (...)
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  3.  52
    Pandora's Box: Reflections on a Myth.Vincent Geoghegan - 2008 - Critical Horizons 9 (1):24-41.
    The article seeks to consider the relationship between hope and utopianism by looking at the ancient Greek myth of Pandora's Box, with its enigmatic figure of hope. It begins by considering Hesiod's influential formulation of the myth, before examining a range of modern interpretations in which diverse conceptions of hope are to be found. Using the work of Spinoza, Hume and Day an alternative conception of hope is proposed that conjoins hope with fear. This is followed by an exploration of (...)
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  4.  15
    Religion and Communism: Feuerbach, Marx and Bloch.Vincent Geoghegan - 2004 - The European Legacy 9 (5):585-595.
    Whilst Marx made scattered positive remarks about the details of communist society, he also made important negative indications. Religion features in this negativity: his critique of religion is withering, there is no mention of religious life in communism, and he is emphatic that religion will play no role in such a society. For Marx, one of the tangible freedoms of communism was freedom from religion. The critique of religion is fundamentally inscribed in the very genesis of Marx's thought, and Feuerbach (...)
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    |[Lsquo]|Let the Dead Bury Their Dead|[Rsquo]|: Marx, Derrida and Bloch.Vincent Geoghegan - 2002 - Contemporary Political Theory 1 (1):5.
    I would like to thank the following for their comments on earlier drafts: Yves Le Juen, Moya Lloyd, Iain MacKenzie, Shane O'Neill, and the two anonymous reviewers of Contemporary Political Theory.
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  6.  3
    ‘Let the Dead Bury Their Dead’: Marx, Derrida and Bloch.Vincent Geoghegan - 2002 - Contemporary Political Theory 1 (1):5-18.
    I would like to thank the following for their comments on earlier drafts: Yves Le Juen, Moya Lloyd, Iain MacKenzie, Shane O'Neill, and the two anonymous reviewers of Contemporary Political Theory.
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  7.  7
    Religious Narrative, Post‐Secularism and Utopia.Vincent Geoghegan - 2000 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (2-3):205-224.
    (2000). Religious narrative, post‐secularism and Utopia. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 3, The Philosophy of Utopia, pp. 205-224.
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  8.  2
    National Past, Socialist Future.Vincent Geoghegan - 1994 - History of European Ideas 19 (1-3):293-299.
  9. A Golden-Age, From the Reign of Kronos to the Realm of Freedom.Vincent Geoghegan - 1991 - History of Political Thought 12 (2):189-207.
     
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  10. The Preconditions of Socialism.Vincent Geoghegan - 1996 - History of European Ideas 22 (2):153-154.