30 found
Order:
  1. Perfectionism and Neutrality: Essays in Liberal Theory.Bruce Ackerman, Richard J. Arneson, Ronald W. Dworkin, Gerald F. Gaus, Kent Greenawalt, Vinit Haksar, Thomas Hurka, George Klosko, Charles Larmore, Stephen Macedo, Thomas Nagel, John Rawls, Joseph Raz & George Sher - 2003 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Editors provide a substantive introduction to the history and theories of perfectionism and neutrality, expertly contextualizing the essays and making the collection accessible.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  2. The Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi for the Twenty-First Century.Bhikhu Parekh, Anthony Parel, Vinit Haksar, Richard L. Johnson, Nicholas F. Gier, Fred Dallmayr, Joseph Prabhu, Naresh Dadhich, Makarand Paranjape, Margaret Chatterjee & M. V. Naidu - 2008 - Lexington Books.
    This volume shows how Gandhi's thought and action-oriented approach are significant, relevant, and urgently needed for addressing major contemporary problems and concerns, including issues of violence and nonviolence, war and peace, religious conflict and dialogue, terrorism, ethics, civil disobedience, injustice, modernism and postmodernism, oppression and exploitation, and environmental destruction. Appropriate for general readers and Gandhi specialists, this volume will be of interest for those in philosophy, religion, political science, history, cultural studies, peace studies, and many other fields.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  3.  47
    Necessary Evil: Justification, Excuse or Pardon? [REVIEW]Vinit Haksar - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):333-347.
    The problem of necessary evil is a sub-class of the problem of moral dilemmas. In cases of genuine moral dilemmas the agent cannot avoid doing evil whatever he does. In some cases of genuine moral dilemmas, the options facing the agent are incommensurable. But in some other cases of genuine moral dilemmas, though wrong doing is inescapable, there is a rationally best course of action. These are cases of necessary evil. There are several views regarding the doing of necessary evil. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4. Excuses and Voluntary Conduct.Vinit Haksar - 1986 - Ethics 96 (2):317-329.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5. Rawls and Gandhi on Civil Disobedience.Vinit Haksar - 1976 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 19 (1-4):151 – 192.
    In the first section I compare and contrast Rawls's and Gandhi's views on civil disobedience as a form of persuasion. I discuss the difficulties facing such forms of civil disobedience; the argument that such forms of civil disobedience are redundant is examined and rejected. Some modifications of Rawls's theory are suggested regarding when civil disobedience is justified and what form it should take. Also, I argue, as against Rawls, that the Rawlsian State should, when that is necessary to prevent anarchy, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  59
    The Alleged Paradox of Democracy.Vinit Haksar - 1976 - Analysis 37 (1):10 - 14.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  7
    Equality, Liberty, and Perfectionism.Vinit Haksar - 1979 - Noûs 17 (2):308-315.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  8. Ideals of Living (Perfectionism).Vinit Haksar - 2010 - In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
  9.  65
    Violence in a Spirit of Love: Gandhi and the Limits of Non-Violence.Vinit Haksar - 2012 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):303-324.
    The paper considers how Mahatma Gandhi?s Law of Ahimsa (or non-violence) can be reconciled with the necessity of violence; some of the strategies that Gandhi adopts in response to this problem are critically examined. Gandhi was willing to use (outward) violence as an expedience (in the sense of necessity), but he was opposed to using non-violence as an expedience. There are two versions of Gandhi?s doctrine. He makes a distinction between outward violence and inner violence. Both versions grant that outward (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  39
    Coercive Proposals [Rawls and Gandhi].Vinit Haksar - 1976 - Political Theory 4 (1):65-79.
  11. Civil Disobedience, Threats and Offers Gandhi and Rawls.Vinit Haksar - 1986
  12.  35
    The Responsibility of Psychopaths.Vinit Haksar - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (59):135-145.
  13.  32
    Collective Rights and the Value of Groups.Vinit Haksar - 1998 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):21 – 43.
    Two kinds of intrinsically valuable entities are distinguished - those that are ends-in- themselves (and therefore sacred) and those that are intrinsically good. It is suggested that it is the individual rather than the group that is sacred in the primary sense. To be sacred or an end-in-itself implies that the sacred entity must not be replaced by a potential entity even if more good can be promoted by doing so. It is suggested that only entities that have an irreducible (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  26
    Rawls' Theory of Justice.Vinit Haksar - 1972 - Analysis 32 (5):149 - 153.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  20
    Aristotle and the Punishment of Psychopaths.Vinit Haksar - 1964 - Philosophy 39 (150):323 - 340.
    In A paper called ‘The Responsibility of Psychopaths’, I think I succeeded in establishing that we cannot rule out a priori the possibility that psychopaths may be shown to be lacking in responsibility. I also examined some arguments that try to show the psychopathto be lacking in responsibility, but I concluded that these arguments were not very successful. In this paper I intend to make and examine some more attempts at showing the psychopath to be lacking in responsibility. But before (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16. Teichman, Jenny, "Illegitimacy: An Examination of Bastardy". [REVIEW]Vinit Haksar - 1982 - Ethics 93:821.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  7
    Doing and Deserving.Vinit Haksar - 1971 - Philosophical Books 12 (3):7-9.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  11
    Rights and Excuses: A Reply to Brady.Vinit Haksar - 1987 - Ethics 97 (4):796-799.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  2
    Responsibility By Jonathan Glover, Published by Routledge & Kegan Paul 1970. Pp. 204. Price £2.25.Vinit Haksar - 1972 - Philosophy 47 (179):83-.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  3
    Symposium: Responsibility.Vinit Haksar & C. H. Whiteley - 1966 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 40:187 - 234.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  2
    A Scientific Morality?Vinit Haksar - 1967 - Philosophy 42 (161):245 - 264.
    It is neither possible, nor desirable, to have a system of dealing with criminals that does away with norms. But Lady Wootton sometimes talks as if it is possible and desirable to do away with norms. And she claims that in her pragmatic system norms have been done away with. She believes her pragmatic system of dealing with criminals is, unlike our present system, scientific. There are at least two respects in which she seems to be claiming that her system (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  1
    The Responsibility of Mental Defectives.Vinit Haksar - 1963 - Philosophy 38 (143):61 - 68.
    It is generally agreed that at least those who suffer from severe mental subnormality, like idiots, are not responsible for the antisocial actions that they may commit. Even Lady Wootton agrees that in the case of idiots and imbeciles ‘the defect is so great that no dispute is likely to arise, either as to the reality of the handicap or as to its effect in impairing capacity to conform to expected standards’. 1 This passage, incidentally, contradicts some of her other (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Free-Will, Responsibility and Punishment.Vinit Haksar - 1968
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. GLOVER, JONATHAN-"Responsibility". [REVIEW]Vinit Haksar - 1972 - Philosophy 47:83.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  9
    Indivisible Selves and Moral Practice.Vinit Haksar - 1991 - Barnes & Noble.
  26. No Title Available: PHILOSOPHY.Vinit Haksar - 1972 - Philosophy 47 (179):83-85.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Podstawy do równości.Vinit Haksar - 1980 - Etyka 18.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Responsibility.Vinit Haksar & C. H. Whiteley - 1966 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 40 (1):187-234.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Rawl's theory of justice.Vinit Haksar - 1972 - Erkenntnis 32 (5):149.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Symposium: Responsibility.Vinit Haksar & C. H. Whiteley - 1966 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes( 40:187-234.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography