Results for 'Violence'

998 found
Order:
  1.  12
    Cultural Violence, Hegemony and Agonistic Interventions.Fuat Gürsözlü - 2018 - In Peace, Culture, and Violence. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. pp. 84-105.
    The chapter explores Johan Galtung’s theory of cultural violence from the perspective of a hegemony centered account of the social. It argues that once we take hegemony as a central organizing idea of the social, it becomes possible to recognize the limits of Galtung’s account of cultural violence and why his response to it remains weak. It defends a politics of contestation and a politics of disruption as possible ways to counter the risks introduced by cultural violence.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. What is Violence?Amanda Cawston - 2015 - In Herjeet Marway & Heather Widdows (eds.), Women and Violence: The Agency of Victims and Perpetrators. Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 216-231.
    The aim of this chapter is to uncover a specifically political conception of violence which will capture our interest in violence as it relates to a fundamental problem for society. The chapter will first analyze (and reject) several existing definitions of violence in terms of whether they successfully describe a fundamental problem, then propose a new conception of violence that directs our attention towards problematic attitudes rather than types of actions. This new conception allows us to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. "How America Disguises its Violence: Colonialism, Mass Incarceration, and the Need for Resistant Imagination".Shari Stone-Mediatore - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2019 (5):1-20.
    This paper examines how a delusive social imaginary of criminal-justice has underpinned contemporary U.S. mass incarceration and encouraged widespread indifference to its violence. I trace the complicity of this criminal-justice imaginary with state-organized violence by comparing it to an imaginary that supported colonial violence. I conclude by discussing how those of us outside of prison can begin to resist the entrenched images and institutions of mass incarceration by engaging the work and imagining the perspective of incarcerated people.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Violence: Six Sideways Reflections.Slavoj Žižek - 2008 - Picador.
    Book synopsis: Philosopher, cultural critic, and agent provocateur Slavoj Žižek constructs a fascinating new framework to look at the forces of violence in our world. Using history, philosophy, books, movies, Lacanian psychiatry, and jokes, Slavoj Žižek examines the ways we perceive and misperceive violence. Drawing from his unique cultural vision, Žižek brings new light to the Paris riots of 2005; he questions the permissiveness of violence in philanthropy; in daring terms, he reflects on the powerful image and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  5. Neuroprediction, Violence, and the Law: Setting the Stage.Thomas Nadelhoffer, Stephanos Bibas, Scott Grafton, Kent A. Kiehl, Andrew Mansfield, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Michael Gazzaniga - 2012 - Neuroethics 5 (1):67-99.
    In this paper, our goal is to survey some of the legal contexts within which violence risk assessment already plays a prominent role, explore whether developments in neuroscience could potentially be used to improve our ability to predict violence, and discuss whether neuropredictive models of violence create any unique legal or moral problems above and beyond the well worn problems already associated with prediction more generally. In Violence Risk Assessment and the Law, we briefly examine the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  6. Uncivil Disobedience: Political Commitment and Violence.N. P. Adams - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (4):475-491.
    Standard accounts of civil disobedience include nonviolence as a necessary condition. Here I argue that such accounts are mistaken and that civil disobedience can include violence in many aspects, primarily excepting violence directed at other persons. I base this argument on a novel understanding of civil disobedience: the special character of the practice comes from its combination of condemnation of a political practice with an expressed commitment to the political. The commitment to the political is a commitment to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Domestic Violence as a Violation of Autonomy and Agency.Marilea Bramer - 2011 - Social Philosophy Today 27:97-110.
    Contrary to what we might initially think, domestic violence is not simply a violation of respect. This characterization of domestic violence misses two key points. First, the issue of respect in connection with domestic violence is not as straightforward as it appears. Second, domestic violence is also a violation of care. These key points explain how domestic violence negatively affects a victim’s autonomy and agency—the ability to choose and pursue her own goals and life plan.We (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  58
    The Justification of Religious Violence, by Steve Clarke: Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell, 2014, Pp. Xii + 259, US$29.95.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (1):206-206.
  9. The Violence of Silencing.Barrett Emerick - forthcoming - In Jennifer Kling (ed.), Pacifism, Politics, and Feminism: Intersections and Innovations. Brill.
    I argue that silencing (the act of preventing someone from communicating, broadly construed) can be an act of both interpersonal and institutional violence. My argument has two main steps. First, I follow others in analyzing violence as violation of integrity and show that undermining someone’s capacities as a knower can be such a violation. Second, I argue that silencing someone can violate their epistemic capacities in that way. I conclude by exploring when silencing someone might be morally justifiable, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Towards a Phenomenological Theory of Violence: Reflections Following Merleau-Ponty and Schutz.Michael Staudigl - 2007 - Human Studies 30 (3):233-253.
    This paper lays the groundwork for developing a thorough-going phenomenological description of different phenomena of violence such as physical, psychic and structural violence. The overall aim is to provide subject-centered approaches to violence within the social sciences and the humanities with an integrative theoretical framework. To do so, I will draw primarily on the phenomenological accounts of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Alfred Schutz, and thereby present guiding clues for a phenomenologically grounded theory of violence.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  11.  38
    Missing in Action: Violence, Power, and Discerning Agency.Alisa Bierria - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (1):129-145.
    How can black feminist and women of color feminist theoretical interventions help create frameworks for discerning agentic action in the context of power, oppression, and violence? In this paper, I explore the social dimension of agency and argue that intention is not just authored by the agent as a function of practical reasoning, but is also socially authored through others' discernment and translation of her action. Further, when facilitated by reasoning designed to reinforce and rationalize systems of domination, social (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. Evil, Political Violence, and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card.Todd Calder, Claudia Card, Ann Cudd, Eric Kraemer, Alice MacLachlan, Sarah Clark Miller, María Pía Lara, Robin May Schott, Laurence Thomas & Lynne Tirrell - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    Rather than focusing on political and legal debates surrounding attempts to determine if and when genocidal rape has taken place in a particular setting, this essay turns instead to a crucial, yet neglected area of inquiry: the moral significance of genocidal rape, and more specifically, the nature of the harms that constitute the culpable wrongdoing that genocidal rape represents. In contrast to standard philosophical accounts, which tend to employ an individualistic framework, this essay offers a situated understanding of harm that (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13. Overcoming Modernity and Violence.Gennady Shkliarevsky - 2015 - Cosmos and History 11 (1):299-314.
    Violence is one of the most pervasive problems in the world today. Despite all efforts to apply the powers of reason in order to contain, if not completely eliminate violence, violence proves to be capable of escaping capture and re-emerging in new and unexpected forms. Reason and rationality appear to be powerless against violence. The paper explores some philosophical issues that shed new light on the persistence of violence in the modern world. It argues that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Sartre on Violence: Curiously Ambivalent.Ronald E. Santoni - 2003 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    From "Materialism and Revolution" through _Hope Now_, Jean-Paul Sartre was deeply engaged with questions about the meaning and justifiability of violence. In the first comprehensive treatment of Sartre’s views on the subject, Ronald Santoni begins by tracing the full trajectory of Sartre’s evolving thought on violence and shows how the "curious ambiguity" of freedom affirming itself against freedom in his earliest writings about violence developed into his "curiously ambivalent" position through his later writings.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  15.  38
    Violence, Just Cyber War and Information.Massimo Durante - 2015 - Philosophy and Technology 28 (3):369-385.
    Cyber warfare has changed the scenario of war from an empirical and a theoretical viewpoint. Cyber war is no longer based on physical violence only, but on military, political, economic and ideological strategies meant to exploit a state’s informational resources. This means that a deeper understanding of what cyber war is requires us to adopt an informational approach. This approach may enable us to account for the two-dimensional nature of cyber war, to revise the notion of violence on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  5
    Political Disagreement and Conceptions of Violence.Amanda Cawston - 2018 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 4 (80):721-747.
    Reflecting on peace is intimately connected to how one conceptualizes violence. Moreover, thinking about violence is closely tied to how one conceives of socio-political life and the fundamental problems or threats that it faces. Political disagreement then, translates into disparate notions of violence and of peace. In light of this, some theorists, including Johan Galtung, advocate adoption of a singular, extended definition of violence that can accommodate this divide, paired with a corresponding two-part understanding of peace. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  4
    Violence: A Micro-Sociological Theory.Randall Collins - 2009
    In the popular misconception fostered by blockbuster action movies and best-selling thrillers--not to mention conventional explanations by social scientists--violence is easy under certain conditions, like poverty, racial or ideological hatreds, or family pathologies. Randall Collins challenges this view in Violence, arguing that violent confrontation goes against human physiological hardwiring. It is the exception, not the rule--regardless of the underlying conditions or motivations. -/- Collins gives a comprehensive explanation of violence and its dynamics, drawing upon video footage, cutting-edge (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18. Violence and Phenomenology.James Dodd - 2009 - Routledge.
    This book pursues the problem of whether violence can be understood to be constitutive of its own sense or meaning, as opposed to being merely instrumental. Dodd draws on the resources of phenomenological philosophy, and takes the form of a series of dialogues between figures both inside and outside of this tradition. The central figures considered include Carl von Clausewitz, Carl Schmitt, Hannah Arendt, Jean-Paul Sartre, Ernst Jünger, and Martin Heidegger, and the study concludes with an analysis of the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. The Link Between Animal Abuse and Human Violence.Andrew Linzey (ed.) - 2009 - Sussex Academic Press.
    This book is about the link between animal abuse and human violence.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20. The Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) Genetic Predisposition to Impulsive Violence: Is It Relevant to Criminal Trials?Matthew L. Baum - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (2):287-306.
    In Italy, a judge reduced the sentence of a defendant by 1 year in response to evidence for a genetic predisposition to violence. The best characterized of these genetic differences, those in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), were cited as especially relevant. Several months previously in the USA, MAOA data contributed to a jury reducing charges from 1st degree murder (a capital offence) to voluntary manslaughter. Is there a rational basis for this type of use of MAOA evidence in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  45
    Making Loud Bodies “Feminine”: A Feminist-Phenomenological Analysis of Obstetric Violence.Sara Cohen Shabot - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (2):231-247.
    Obstetric violence has been analyzed from various perspectives. Its psychological effects have been evaluated, and there have been several recent sociological and anthropological studies on the subject. But what I offer in this paper is a philosophical analysis of obstetric violence, particularly focused on how this violence is lived and experienced by women and why it is frequently described not only in terms of violence in general but specifically in terms of gender violence: as (...) directed at women because they are women. For this purpose, I find feminist phenomenology most useful as a way to explain and account for the feelings that many victims of this violence experience and report, including feelings of embodied oppression, of the diminishment of self, of physical and emotional infantilization. I believe that the insights to be found in feminist phenomenology are crucial for explaining how and why this phenomenon is different in kind from other types of medical violence, objectification, and reification. Iris Marion Young’s description of feminine existence under patriarchy, as conformed by a perpetual oppressive “I cannot,” is at the center of my analysis. I argue that laboring bodies are at least potentially perceived as antithetical to the myth of femininity, undermining the feminine mode of bodily comportment under patriarchy and thereby seriously threatening the hegemonic powers. Violence, then, appears to be necessary in order to domesticate these bodies, to make them “feminine” again. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  38
    Explaining Violence ‐ Towards a Critical Friendship with Neuroscience?Larry Ray - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (3):335-356.
    The neurosciences challenge the ‘standard social science’ model of human behaviour particularly with reference to violence. Although explanations of violence are interdisciplinary it remains controversial to work across the division between the social and biological sciences. Neuroscience can be subject to familiar sociological critiques of scientism and reductionism but this paper considers whether this view should be reassessed. Concepts of brain plasticity and epigenetics could prompt reconsideration of the dichotomy of the social and natural while raising questions about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  37
    Functional Links Between Intimate Partner Violence and Animal Abuse: Personality Features and Representations of Aggression.Maya Gupta - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (3):223-242.
    Acts of intimate partner violence and abuse of nonhuman animals are common, harmful, and co-occurring phenomena. The aim of the present study was to identify perpetrator subtypes based on variable paths hypothesized to influence physical violence toward both partners and nonhuman animals: callousness and instrumental representations of aggression and rejection-sensitivity and expressive representations of aggression. Strong associations emerged between callousness and instrumental representations and between rejection-sensitivity and expressive representations. For males, callousness directly predicted both IPV and animal abuse. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  24.  26
    Enfolding Violence, Unfolding Hope: Emerging Clouds of Possibility for Women in Roman Catholicism.Colleen Mary Carpenter - 2016 - Zygon 51 (3):797-808.
    In an effort to think through possible impossibilities, and enfold current problems within Catholicism into the luminous darkness of the cloud of the im/possible, this response to Catherine Keller's Cloud of the Impossible considers what might happen should Keller's cloud of mindful unknowing and nonseparable difference billow over and through one particular Catholic conundrum: how to respond to the terrifying reality of domestic violence in the context of a marriage defined as indissoluble, imperishable—inescapable.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  27
    Violence and Shattered Trust: Sociological Considerations. [REVIEW]Martin Endreß & Andrea Pabst - 2013 - Human Studies 36 (1):89-106.
    The paper starts from a phenomenology of violence that reconsiders the phenomenal contours of the seemingly opposed concepts of violence, on the one hand physical violence and on the other hand structural violence. We argue that the implied definiteness of their reciprocal separableness is not given. Instead, violence should be understood as the negation of sociality. As such, it is closely related to a basic form of trust in relation to people’s self-awareness, and their relation (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  41
    In the Name of God: The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Ethics and Violence.John Teehan - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Religion is one of the most powerful forces running through human history, and although often presented as a force for good, its impact is frequently violent and divisive. This provocative work brings together cutting-edge research from both evolutionary and cognitive psychology to help readers understand the psychological structure of religious morality and the origins of religious violence. Introduces a fundamentally new approach to the analysis of religion in a style accessible to the general reader Applies insights from evolutionary and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. Arendt and Hobbes: Glory, Sacrificial Violence, and the Political Imagination.Peg Birmingham - 2011 - Research in Phenomenology 41 (1):1-22.
    The dominant narrative today of modern political power, inspired by Foucault, is one that traces the move from the spectacle of the scaffold to the disciplining of bodies whereby the modern political subject, animated by a fundamental fear and the will to live, is promised security in exchange for obedience and productivity. In this essay, I call into question this narrative, arguing that that the modern political imagination, rooted in Hobbes, is animated not by fear but instead by the desire (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  17
    Religion and Violence. Paradoxes of Religious Communication.Ilja Srubar - 2017 - Human Studies 40 (4):501-518.
    Religion and violence are related in an ambivalent, paradoxical way, for the systems of religious knowledge tend to prohibit violence and to motivate it at the same time. This paper looks for the roots of that ambivalence and reveals particular mechanisms that generate violence within religious systems and their associated practices. It argues that violence in religious systems is present in at least three forms: It is inherent to communication with the “sacred,” it is generated by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. The Violence of Care: An Analysis of Foucault's Pastor.Christopher Mayes - 2010 - Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory.
    This paper will address Foucault’s analysis of the Hebrew and Christian pastor and argue that Foucault’s analysis of pastoral power in Security, Territory, Population neglects an important characteristic of the shepherd/pastor figure: violence. Despite Foucault’s close analysis of the early development of the Hebrew pastor, he overlooks the role of violence and instead focuses on sacrifice. However the sacrificial pastor does not figure in the Hebrew Scriptures. The Hebrew pastor is called to lead, feed and protect the flock, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  19
    The Syntax of Violence. Between Hegel and Marx.Vittorio Morfino - 2009 - Historical Materialism 17 (3):81-100.
    The Marxian Thesis about the role of violence in History, as it is enunciated in The Capital, is investigated through an analysis of the Hegelian character of its syntax, and the way Engels develops it; a non-teleological interpretation of the thesis is then defended, one that understands that violence presents a plurality of forms, a pervasive character and a heavy materiality.Trata-se de investigar a tese marxiana acerca do papel da violência na história, tal como enunciada em O Capital, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  31
    Violence and Historicity: Derrida’s Early Readings of Heidegger.Michael Naas - 2015 - Research in Phenomenology 45 (2):191-213.
    _ Source: _Volume 45, Issue 2, pp 191 - 213 With the recent publication of Jacques Derrida’s seminar of 1964–65, Heidegger: The Question of Being and History, it has become abundantly clear that when the full history of Derrida’s half-century-long engagement with Heidegger is finally written a special place will have to be reserved for the question of history itself, and especially the question of history or historicity in its irreducible relationship to language and to violence. In this essay, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  51
    Non-Violence Towards Animals in the Thinking of Gandhi: The Problem of Animal Husbandry. [REVIEW]Florence Burgat - 2004 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (3):223-248.
    The question of the imperatives induced by the Gandhian concept of non-violence towards animals is an issue that has been neglected by specialists on the thinking of the Mahatma. The aim of this article is to highlight the systematic – and significant – character of this particular aspect of his views on non-violence. The first part introduces the theoretical foundations of the duty of non-violence towards animals in general. Gandhi's critical interpretation of cow-protection, advocated by Hinduism, leads (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33.  16
    Christian Mission in the Midst of Violence[REVIEW]Domenic Marbaniang - 2014 - Journal of the Contemporary Christian 6.
    The 2013 FOIM (Fellowship of Indian Missiologists) Conference was hosted at Punalur, Kerala. 12 papers from this conference were compiled and published in Christian Mission in the Midst of Violence under the editorship of Dr. Joy Thomas SVD, director of Ishvani Kendra of Pune and Secretary of FOIM and Dr. Siga Arles, director of the Centre for Contemporary Christianity of Bangalore.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  18
    While You Were Sleepwalking: Science and Neurobiology of Sleep Disorders & the Enigma of Legal Responsibility of Violence During Parasomnia.Shreeya Popat & William Winslade - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (2):203-214.
    In terms of medical science and legal responsibility, the sleep disorder category of parasomnias, chiefly REM sleep behavior disorder and somnambulism, pose an enigmatic dilemma. During an episode of parasomnia, individuals are neither awake nor aware, but their actions appear conscious. As these actions move beyond the innocuous, such as eating and blurting out embarrassing information, and enter the realm of rape and homicide, their degree of importance and relevance increases exponentially. Parasomnias that result in illegal activity, particularly violence, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  43
    Motivating Questions and Partial Answers: A Response to Prosecuting Domestic Violence by Michelle Madden Dempsey. [REVIEW]Sharon Cowan - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (3):543-555.
    Michelle Madden Dempsey’s compelling book sets out a normative feminist argument as to why and when prosecutors should continue to pursue prosecutions in domestic violence cases where the victim refuses to participate in or has withdrawn their support for the prosecution. This paper will explore two of the key aspects of her argument—the centrality and definition of the concept of patriarchy, and the definition of domestic violence—before concluding with some final thoughts as to the appropriate parameters of feminist (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Critique of Violence: Between Poststructuralism and Critical Theory.Beatrice Hanssen - 2000 - Routledge.
    Critique of Violence is a highly original and lucid investigation of the heated controversy between poststructuralism and critical theory. Leading theorist Beatrice Hanssen uses Walter Benjamin's essay 'Critique of Violence' as a guide to analyse the contentious debate, shifting the emphasis from struggle to dialogue between the two parties. Regarding the questions of critique and violence as the major meeting points between both traditions, Hanssen positions herself between the two in an effort to investigate what critical theory (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  3
    "Violence and the Boundaries of the Community: A Relational Approach to Autonomy".John Lawless - 2019 - In Jennifer Kling (ed.), Pacifism, Politics, and Feminism: Intersections and Innovations. Leiden, NL: Brill. pp. 07-27.
    One common approach to autonomy begins by drawing boundaries around the agent, dividing her from external forces that limit her options, hostile agents who would harness her to their projects, and rebellious motivations embedded within her own psychology. Relational approaches to autonomy blur these boundaries, demonstrating the ways in which autonomy is possible only in mutually respectful, caring relationships. I develop a particular kind of relational approach, on which autonomy requires others’ recognition that certain choices belong to us. That is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  88
    Engendering Justice: Constructing Institutions to Address Violence Against Women.Shannon Drysdale Walsh - 2008 - Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):48-66.
    This paper addresses how states improve their responsiveness to violence against women in developing countries with little political will and few resources to do so. One key to engendering justice and improving responsiveness is building specialized institutions within the state that facilitate the implementation of laws addressing violence against women. Why and how do states engage in institution-building to protect marginalized populations in these contexts? I propose that developing countries are more likely to create and maintain specialized institutions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Women in Guatemala’s Metropolitan Area: Violence, Law, and Social Justice.Paula Godoy-Paiz - 2008 - Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):27-47.
    In this article I examine the legal framework for addressing violence against women in post war Guatemala. Since the signing of the Peace Accords in 1996, judicial reform in Guatemala has included the passing of laws in the area of women‘s human rights, aimed at eliminating discrimination and violence against women. These laws constitute a response to and have occurred concurrently to an increase in violent crime against women, particularly in the form of mass rapes and murders. Drawing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Anatomy of Religious Violence.Domenic Marbaniang - 2008 - Basileia 1 (1):24.
    Religious violence is a function of deep philosophical and psychological belief-behavior. This article explores the issue in light of Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, and Psychology of evil.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  44
    Understanding Violence: The Intertwining of Morality, Religion and Violence: A Philosophical Stance.Lorenzo Magnani - 2011 - Springer Verlag.
    This volume sets out to give a philosophical "applied" account of violence, engaged with both empirical and theoretical debates in other disciplines such as cognitive science, sociology, psychiatry, anthropology, political theory, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  69
    Foucault, Politics, and Violence.Johanna Oksala - 2011 - Northwestern University Press.
    In her book, Oksala shows that the arguments for the ineliminability of violence from the political are often based on excessively broad, ontological conceptions of violence distinct from its concrete and physical meaning and, on the other hand, on a restrictively narrow and empirical understanding of politics as the realm of conventional political institutions.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  24
    Violence and Selfhood.James Mensch - 2013 - Human Studies 36 (1):25-41.
    Is violence senseless or is it at the origin of sense? Does its destruction of meaning disclose ourselves as the origin of meaning? Or is it the case that it leaves in its wake only a barren field? Does it result in renewal or only in a sense of dead loss? To answer these questions, I shall look at James Dodd’s, Hegel’s, and Carl Schmitt’s accounts of the creative power of violence—particularly with regard to its ability to give (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  65
    Symbolic Boundaries and Collective Violence. A New Theoretical Argument for an Explanatory Sociology of Collective Violent Action.Eddie Hartmann - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (2):165-186.
    The sociology of violence still struggles with two critical questions: What motivates people to act violently on behalf of groups and how do they come to identify with the groups for which they act? Methodologically the article addresses these puzzling problems in favor of a relational sociology that argues against both micro- and macro-reductionist accounts, while theoretically it proposes a twofold reorientation: first, it makes a plea for the so called cognitive turn in social theory; second, it proposes following (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  6
    Violence, Teenage Pregnancy, and Life History.Lee T. Copping, Anne Campbell & Steven Muncer - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (2):137-157.
    Guided by principles of life history strategy development, this study tested the hypothesis that sexual precocity and violence are influenced by sensitivities to local environmental conditions. Two models of strategy development were compared: The first is based on indirect perception of ecological cues through family disruption and the second is based on both direct and indirect perception of ecological stressors. Results showed a moderate correlation between rates of violence and sexual precocity (r = 0.59). Although a model incorporating (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  68
    Returning (to) the Gift of Death: Violence and History in Derrida and Levinas.Jeffrey Hanson - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (1):1 - 15.
    The purpose of this paper is to establish a proper context for reading Jacques Derrida's The Gift of Death, which, I contend, can only be understood fully against the backdrop of "Violence and Metaphysics." The later work cannot be fully understood unless the reader appreciates the fact that Derrida returns to "a certain Abraham" not only in the name of Kierkegaard but also in the name of Levinas himself. The hypothesis of the reading that follows therefore would be that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  3
    Spinoza, Feminism, and Domestic Violence.Christopher Yeomans - 2003 - Iyyun 52 (1):54-74.
    In this paper I discuss two related ideas and cross-reference them, as it were, on the common ground of the Spinozistic text. First, I want to construct a Spinozistic account of domestic violence and a Spinozistic response to such violence. This will involve attempting to explicate the phenomenon (or at least one aspect of it, to be defined) through the terms and conceptual structure of Spinoza's Ethics. Second, I want to discuss a feminist reading (interpretation) of Spinoza, that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  49
    The Duty to Protect Women From Sexual Violence in South Africa.Sibongile Ndashe - 2004 - Feminist Legal Studies 12 (2):213-221.
    In 1998 Ghia Van Eeden was sexually assaulted by a serial rapist who had escaped from police custody due to the negligence of the South African police authorities. Claiming that the State owed a common law duty of care to potential victims to protect them from violent crimes, Van Eeden sought damages for the harm she had suffered. In a path-breaking decision, the Supreme Court of Appeal (S.C.A.) found that a duty of care did indeed exist and that its execution (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  22
    GREED AS VIOLENCE: Methodological Challenges in Interreligious Dialogue on the Ethics of the Global Financial Crisis.Shanta Premawardhana - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (2):223-245.
    The current financial crisis is one rooted not in recent deregulation but in the breaking of ancient (religious) laws, and this crisis is one of many ethical problems today that have religious roots. The tone of this essay is informed by a document from the World Council of Churches, which affirms "greed as violence" and that Christians do not have all the answers to the problem of greed; therefore, Christians need to seek solutions with other religious communities. Furthermore, religious (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  98
    Reflections on Understanding Violence.Jeffrey Benjamin White - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (3):439-444.
    Lorenzo Magnani’s Understanding Violence: The Intertwining of Morality, Religion and Violence is a big 23 book. Not big in the sense of page count or prepublication advertisement, but big in the sense of pregnant 24 with potential application. Professor Magnani is explicit in his intentions, “to show how violence is de facto 25 intertwined with morality, and how much violence is hidden, and invisibly or unintentionally performed" 26 (page 273) while confessing a personal motivation, “warning myself (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 998