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Virginia Slaughter [9]Virginia P. Slaughter [2]
  1. Development of Preferences for the Human Body Shape in Infancy.Virginia Slaughter, Michelle Heron & Susan Sim - 2002 - Cognition 85 (3):71-81.
    Two studies investigated the development of infants' visual preferences for the human body shape. In Study 1, infants of 12,15 and 18 months were tested in a standard preferential looking experiment, in which they were shown paired line drawings of typical and scrambled bodies. Results indicated that the 18-month-olds had a reliable preference for the scrambled body shapes over typical body shapes, while the younger infants did not show differential responding. In Study 2, 12- and 18-month-olds were tested with the (...)
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  2.  36
    A Temporally Sustained Implicit Theory of Mind Deficit in Autism Spectrum Disorders.Dana Schneider, Virginia P. Slaughter, Andrew P. Bayliss & Paul E. Dux - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):410-417.
    Eye movements during false-belief tasks can reveal an individual's capacity to implicitly monitor others' mental states (theory of mind - ToM). It has been suggested, based on the results of a single-trial-experiment, that this ability is impaired in those with a high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), despite neurotypical-like performance on explicit ToM measures. However, given there are known attention differences and visual hypersensitivities in ASD it is important to establish whether such impairments are evident over time. In addition, investigating implicit (...)
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  3.  7
    Cultural Effects on Mindreading.Daniel Perez-Zapata, Virginia Slaughter & Julie D. Henry - 2016 - Cognition 146:410-414.
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  4.  13
    Movement Contributes to Infants' Recognition of the Human Form.Tamara Christie & Virginia Slaughter - 2010 - Cognition 114 (3):329-337.
    Three experiments demonstrate that biological movement facilitates young infants’ recognition of the whole human form. A body discrimination task was used in which 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old infants were habituated to typical human bodies and then shown scrambled human bodies at the test. Recovery of interest to the scrambled bodies was observed in 9- and 12-month-old infants in Experiment 1, but only when the body images were animated to move in a biologically possible way. In Experiment 2, nonbiological movement was (...)
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  5.  16
    Early Development of Body Representations.Tamara Christie & Virginia Slaughter - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):203-204.
    The dissociations among body representations that Dijkerman & de Haan (D&dH) describe are also supported by developmental evidence. Developmental dissociations among different types of body-related representations suggest distinct functional systems from the start, rather than progressive differentiation.
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  6.  10
    There is No Compelling Evidence That Human Neonates Imitate.Siobhan Kennedy-Costantini, Janine Oostenbroek, Thomas Suddendorf, Mark Nielsen, Jonathan Redshaw, Jacqueline Davis, Sally Clark & Virginia Slaughter - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  7.  8
    Seeing is Not (Necessarily) Believing.Virginia Slaughter & Linda Mealey - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):130-130.
    We doubt that theory of mind can be sufficiently demonstrated without reliance on verbal tests. Where language is the major tool of social manipulation, an effective theory of mind must use language as an input. We suspect, therefore, that in this context, prelinguistic human and nonhuman minds are more alike than are human pre- and postlinguistic minds.
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  8.  9
    Current Evidence for Automatic Theory of Mind Processing in Adults.Dana Schneider, Virginia P. Slaughter & Paul E. Dux - 2017 - Cognition 162:27-31.
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  9.  33
    Emulator as Body Schema.Virginia Slaughter - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):415-416.
    Grush's emulator model appears to be consistent with the idea of a body schema, that is, a detailed mental representation of the body, its structure, and movement in relation to the environment. If the emulator is equivalent to a body schema, then the next step will be to specify how the emulator accounts for neuropsychological and developmental phenomena that have long been hypothesized to involve the body schema.
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  10.  1
    Betty repacholi.Virginia Slaughter, Michelle Pritchard & Vicki Gibbs - 2003 - In B. Repacholi & V. Slaughter (eds.), Individual Differences in Theory of Mind: Implications for Typical and Atypical Development. Hove, E. Sussex: Psychology Press. pp. 68.
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  11. Early Development of Body Representations.Virginia Slaughter & Celia A. Brownell (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Because we engage with the world and each other through our bodies and bodily movements, being able to represent one's own and others' bodies is fundamental to human perception, cognition and behaviour. This edited book brings together, for the first time, developmental perspectives on the growth of body knowledge in infancy and early childhood and how it intersects with other aspects of perception and cognition. The book is organised into three sections addressing the bodily self, the bodies of others and (...)
     
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