Search results for 'Visualization' (try it on Scholar)

306 found
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  1. Peter Langland-Hassan (2011). A Puzzle About Visualization. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):145-173.
    Visual imagination (or visualization) is peculiar in being both free, in that what we imagine is up to us, and useful to a wide variety of practical reasoning tasks. How can we rely upon our visualizations in practical reasoning if what we imagine is subject to our whims? The key to answering this puzzle, I argue, is to provide an account of what constrains the sequence in which the representations featured in visualization unfold—an account that is consistent with (...)
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  2. R. Arp (2006). The Environments of Our Hominin Ancestors, Tool-Usage, and Scenario Visualization. Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):95-117.
    In this paper, I give an account of how our hominin ancestors evolved a conscious ability I call scenario visualization that enabled them to manufacture novel tools so as to survive and flourish in the ever-changing and complex environments in which they lived. I first present the ideas and arguments put forward by evolutionary psychologists that the mind evolved certain mental capacities as adaptive responses to environmental pressures. Specifically, Steven Mithen thinks that the mind has evolved cognitive fluidity, viz., (...)
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  3. Valeria Giardino (2010). Intuition and Visualization in Mathematical Problem Solving. Topoi 29 (1):29-39.
    In this article, I will discuss the relationship between mathematical intuition and mathematical visualization. I will argue that in order to investigate this relationship, it is necessary to consider mathematical activity as a complex phenomenon, which involves many different cognitive resources. I will focus on two kinds of danger in recurring to visualization and I will show that they are not a good reason to conclude that visualization is not reliable, if we consider its use in mathematical (...)
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  4.  55
    Min Chen & Luciano Floridi (2013). An Analysis of Information Visualisation. Synthese 190 (16):3421-3438.
    Philosophers have relied on visual metaphors to analyse ideas and explain their theories at least since Plato. Descartes is famous for his system of axes, and Wittgenstein for his first design of truth table diagrams. Today, visualisation is a form of ‘computer-aided seeing’ information in data. Hence, information is the fundamental ‘currency’ exchanged through a visualisation pipeline. In this article, we examine the types of information that may occur at different stages of a general visualization pipeline. We do so (...)
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  5.  20
    Walter Carnielli (2004). Book Reviews: Claude P. Bruter (Editor), Mathematics in Art: Mathematical Visualization in Art and Education. Logic and Logical Philosophy 13:163-166.
    Claude P. Bruter (editor), Mathematics in Art: Mathematical Visualization in Art and Education, Springer-Verlag, New York, 2002, pp. X + 337, ISBN 3-540-43422-4.
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  6.  14
    Francis T. Marchese (2013). Periodicity, Visualization, and Design. Foundations of Chemistry 15 (1):31-55.
    This paper explores the development of the chemical table as a tool designed for chemical information visualization. It uses a historical context to investigate the purpose of chemical tables and charts, analyzing them from the perspective of theory of tables, cartography, and design. It suggests reasons why the two-dimensional periodic table remains the de facto standard for chemical information display.
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  7.  96
    Kirill V. Istomin, Jaroslava Panáková & Patrick Heady (2014). Culture, Perception, and Artistic Visualization: A Comparative Study of Children's Drawings in Three Siberian Cultural Groups. Cognitive Science 38 (1):76-100.
    In a study of three indigenous and non-indigenous cultural groups in northwestern and northeastern Siberia, framed line tests and a landscape drawing task were used to examine the hypotheses that test-based assessments of context sensitivity and independence are correlated with the amount of contextual information contained in drawings, and with the order in which the focal and background objects are drawn. The results supported these hypotheses, and inspection of the regression relationships suggested that the intergroup variations in test performance were (...)
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  8.  8
    Christopher F. Chabris & Eliot S. Hearst (2003). Visualization, Pattern Recognition, and Forward Search: Effects of Playing Speed and Sight of the Position on Grandmaster Chess Errors. Cognitive Science 27 (4):637-648.
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  9.  4
    Maria Kozhevnikov, Michael A. Motes & Mary Hegarty (2007). Spatial Visualization in Physics Problem Solving. Cognitive Science 31 (4):549-579.
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  10.  71
    David Kirsh (2003). Quantifying the Relative Roles of Shadows, Steropsis, and Aocal Accomodation in 3D Visualization. The 3rd IASTED International Conference on Visualization, Imaging, and Image Processing.
    The goal of three-dimensional visualization is to present information in such a way that the viewer suspends disbelief and uses the screen imagery the same way as he or she would use an identical, real 3D scene. To do this effectively, programmers employ a variety of 3D depth cues. Our own anecdotal experience says that shadows and stereopsis are two of the best for visualization. The nice thing is that both of these are possible to do in interactive (...)
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  11.  7
    Michael Hoffmann & Jason Borenstein (2014). Understanding Ill-Structured Engineering Ethics Problems Through a Collaborative Learning and Argument Visualization Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):261-276.
    As a committee of the National Academy of Engineering recognized, ethics education should foster the ability of students to analyze complex decision situations and ill-structured problems. Building on the NAE’s insights, we report about an innovative teaching approach that has two main features: first, it places the emphasis on deliberation and on self-directed, problem-based learning in small groups of students; and second, it focuses on understanding ill-structured problems. The first innovation is motivated by an abundance of scholarly research that supports (...)
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  12.  1
    Robert Arp (2008). Scenario Visualization: An Evolutionary Account of Creative Problem Solving. A Bradford Book.
    In order to solve problems, humans are able to synthesize apparently unrelated concepts, take advantage of serendipitous opportunities, hypothesize, invent, and engage in other similarly abstract and creative activities, primarily through the use of their visual systems. In _Scenario Visualization_, Robert Arp offers an evolutionary account of the unique human ability to solve nonroutine vision-related problems. He argues that by the close of the Pleistocene epoch, humans evolved a conscious creative problem-solving capacity, which he terms scenario visualization, that enabled (...)
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  13.  13
    Jordi Honey-Rosés, Marc Le Menestrel, Daniel Arenas, Felix Rauschmayer & Julian Rode (2013). Enriching Intergenerational Decision-Making with Guided Visualization Exercises. Journal of Business Ethics:1-6.
    Seriously engaging with the needs, hardships, and aspirations of future generations is an emotional experience as much as an intellectual endeavor. In this essay we describe a guided visualization exercise used to overcome the emotional barriers that often prevent us from dealing effectively with intergenerational decisions. The meditation and dreaming technique was applied to a diverse group of researchers who engaged in a visualized encounter with future generations. Following the exercise, we concluded that a serious analysis of intergenerational conflict (...)
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  14.  84
    Henk W. de Regt (2014). Visualization as a Tool for Understanding. Perspectives on Science 22 (3):377-396.
    The act of understanding is at the heart of all scientific activity; without it any ostensibly scientific activity is as sterile as that of a high school student substituting numbers into a formula. Ordinary language often uses visual metaphors in connection with understanding. When we finally understand what someone is trying to point out to us, we exclaim: “I see!” When someone really understands a subject matter, we say that she has “insight”. There appears to be a link between (...) and understanding, and between visualizability and intelligibility. This applies in science no less than in daily life: visualization is regarded as a useful means of achieving scientific understanding, even in the .. (shrink)
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  15.  43
    Hans Smessaert (2009). On the 3d Visualisation of Logical Relations. Logica Universalis 3 (2):303-332.
    The central aim of this paper is to present a Boolean algebraic approach to the classical Aristotelian Relations of Opposition, namely Contradiction and (Sub)contrariety, and to provide a 3D visualisation of those relations based on the geometrical properties of Platonic and Archimedean solids. In the first part we start from the standard Generalized Quantifier analysis of expressions for comparative quantification to build the Comparative Quantifier Algebra CQA. The underlying scalar structure allows us to define the Aristotelian relations in Boolean terms (...)
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  16.  26
    Robert Arp (2005). Scenario Visualization: One Explanation of Creative Problem Solving. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (3):31-60.
    In this paper, I first present the ideas and arguments put forward by evolutionary psychologists that humans evolved certain capacities to creatively problem solve. Specifically, Steven Mithen thinks that creative problem solving is possible because the mind has evolved a conscious capacity he calls cognitive fluidity, the flexible exchange of information between and among mental modules. While I agree with Mithen that cognitive fluidity acts as a necessary condition for creative problem solving, I disagree that cognitive fluidity alone will suffice (...)
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  17.  24
    Paul Atkinson (2007). The Visualization of Utopia in Recent Science Fiction Film. Colloquy 14:5-20.
    Utopia can be conceived as a possibility – a space within language, a set of principles, or the product of technological development – but it cannot be separated from questions of place, or more accurately, questions of “no place.” 1 In between the theoretically imaginable utopia and its realisation in a particular time and place, there is a space of critique, which is exploited in anti-Utopian and critical dystopian narratives. 2 In Science Fiction narratives of this kind, technology is responsible (...)
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  18.  12
    Michael H. G. Hoffmann & Jeremy A. Lingle (2015). Facilitating Problem-Based Learning by Means of Collaborative Argument Visualization Software in Advance. Teaching Philosophy 38 (4):371-398.
    There is evidence that problem-based learning (PBL) is an effective approach to teach team and problem-solving skills, but also to acquire content knowledge. However, there is hardly any literature about using PBL in philosophy classes. One problem is that PBL is resource intensive because a facilitator is needed for each group of students to support learning efforts and monitor group dynamics. In order to establish more PBL classes, the question is whether PBL can be provided without the need for facilitators. (...)
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  19.  11
    Michael H. G. Hoffmann (2014). Argument Map: Deductive Argument Visualization Stimulates Reflection on Implicit Background Assumptions. Workpress.
    This argument map justifies the claim that using only deductive argument schemes in computer-supported argument visualization stimulates reflection on some of one's implicit background assumptions.
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  20.  21
    Martin Barker (2006). Envisaging 'Visualisation': Some Challenges From the International Lord of the Rings Audience Project. Film-Philosophy 10 (3):1-25.
    This essay explores a series of issues which have emerged around the term ‘visualisation’ asa result of materials generated out of the international Lord of the Rings audience project.‘Visualisation’ is quite widely used as a term in film studies, but not much considered. In this essay I begin from someelements of empirical evidence, and through some unlikely encounters that these spurredwith bodies of work from outside film studies, I develop an argument for a new approach tothinking about ‘visualisation’. This approach (...)
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  21.  7
    David Campbell (2009). “Black Skin and Blood”: Documentary Photography and Santu Mofokeng's Critique of the Visualization of Apartheid South Africa. History and Theory 48 (4):52-58.
    This paper responds to Patricia Hayes’s insightful readings of Santu Mofokeng’s photographic work in South Africa. The paper operates from the premise that photography is a technology of visualization that both draws on and establishes a visual economy through which events and issues are materialized in particular ways. This allows the paper to pose questions and develop understandings about Mofokeng’s work in terms of the way certain factors coalesced to enable a particular representation of black South Africans in the (...)
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  22.  2
    Isabella Sarto-Jackson & Richard R. Nelson (2015). Overcoming the Limits of Quantification by Visualization. Biological Theory 10 (3):253-262.
    Biological sciences have strived to adopt the conceptual framework of physics and have become increasingly quantitatively oriented, aiming to refute the assertion that biology appears unquantifiable, unpredictable, and messy. But despite all effort, biology is characterized by a paucity of quantitative statements with universal applications. Nonetheless, many biological disciplines—most notably molecular biology—have experienced an ascendancy over the last 50 years. The underlying core concepts and ideas permeate and inform many neighboring disciplines. This surprising success is probably not so much attributable (...)
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  23. W. H. (2001). Spacetime Visualisation and the Intelligibility of Physical Theories. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (2):243-265.
    This paper argues that spacetime visualisability is not a necessary condition for the intelligibility of theories in physics. Visualisation can be an important tool for rendering a theory intelligible, but it is by no means a sine qua non. The paper examines the historical transition from classical to quantum physics, and analyses the role of visualisability and its relation to intelligibility. On the basis of this historical analysis, an alternative conception of the intelligibility of scientific theories is proposed, based on (...)
     
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  24.  6
    Carole J. Clem & Jean Paul Rigaut (1995). Computer Simulation Modelling and Visualization of 3d Architecture of Biological Tissues. Acta Biotheoretica 43 (4):425-442.
    Recent technical improvements, such as 3D microscopy imaging, have shown the necessity of studying 3D biological tissue architecture during carcinogenesis. In the present paper a computer simulation model is developed allowing the visualization of the microscopic biological tissue architecture during the development of metaplastic and dysplastic lesions.The static part of the model allows the simulation of the normal, metaplastic and dysplastic architecture of an external epithelium. This model is associated to a knowledge base which contains only data on the (...)
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  25.  1
    Michael Hoffmann & Fabio Paglieri, Cognitive Effects of Argument Visualization Tools.
    External representations play a crucial role in learning. At the same time, cognitive load theory suggests that the possibility of learning depends on limited resources of the working memory and on cognitive load imposed by instructional design and representation tools. Both these observations motivate a critical look at Computer-Supported Argument Visualization tools that are supposed to facilitate learning. This paper uses cognitive load theory to compare the cognitive efficacy of RationaleTM 2 and AGORA.
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  26. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic, Juan M. Durán & D. Slutej (2010). Content Aggregation, Visualization and Emergent Properties in Computer Simulations. In Kai-Mikael Jää-Aro & Thomas Larsson (eds.), SIGRAD 2010 – Content aggregation and visualization. Linköping University Electronic Press 77-83.
  27. Bruno Latour (2012). Visualisation and Cognition: Drawing Things Together. Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (T):207-260.
    The author of the present paper argues that while trying to explain the institutional success of the science and its broad social impact, it is worth throwing aside the arguments concerning the universal traits of human nature, changes in the human mentality, or transformation of the culture and civilization, such as the development of capitalism or bureaucratic power. In the 16th century no new man emerged, and no mutants with overgrown brains work in modern laboratories. So one must also reject (...)
     
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  28. Jan Boom (2015). A New Visualization and Conceptualization of Categorical Longitudinal Development: Measurement Invariance and Change. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  29. David L. Connolly (2015). Visualization of Vertical Hydrocarbon Migration in Seismic Data: Case Studies From the Dutch North Sea. Interpretation 3 (3):SX21-SX27.
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  30. B. Latour (1986). Visualization and Cognition: Thinking with Eyes and Hands. Knowledge and Society 6:1--40.
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  31.  96
    Henk W. de Regt (2001). Spacetime Visualisation and the Intelligibility of Physical Theories. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (2):243-265.
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  32.  18
    Emma I. Meshcheryakova & Anastasia V. Larionova (forthcoming). Fractal Computer Visualization in Psychological Research. AI and Society.
  33.  85
    Henk W. de Regt & Wendy S. Parker (2014). Introduction: Simulation, Visualization, and Scientific Understanding. Perspectives on Science 22 (3):311-317.
    Only a decade ago, the topic of scientific understanding remained one that philosophers of science largely avoided. Earlier discussions by Hempel and others had branded scientific understanding a mere subjective state or feeling, one to be studied by psychologists perhaps, but not an important or fruitful focus for philosophers of science. Even as scientific explanation became a central topic in philosophy of science, little attention was given to understanding. Over the last decade, however, this situation has changed. Analyses of scientific (...)
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  34.  28
    Patrick Maynard (1997). The Engine of Visualization: Thinking Through Photography. Cornell University Press.
    First ever philosophy treatise on photography, analytic in approach but sensitive to photo-history, not confined to aesthetics or art (illus.), Walker Evans photo on cover. Papercover printing, Dec. 2000.
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  35.  53
    Jamie Tappenden, Proof Style and Understanding in Mathematics I: Visualization, Unification and Axiom Choice.
    Mathematical investigation, when done well, can confer understanding. This bare observation shouldn’t be controversial; where obstacles appear is rather in the effort to engage this observation with epistemology. The complexity of the issue of course precludes addressing it tout court in one paper, and I’ll just be laying some early foundations here. To this end I’ll narrow the field in two ways. First, I’ll address a specific account of explanation and understanding that applies naturally to mathematical reasoning: the view proposed (...)
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  36. Douglas Walton, Visualization Tools, Argumentation Schemes and Expert Opinion Evidence in Law.
     
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  37.  27
    Evgeniya Georgieva & Tsvetan Hristov (2007). Design of an E-Learning Content Visualization Module. Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 40 (3):245.
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  38.  16
    Robert L. Goldstone, Franco Pestilli & Katy Börner (2015). Self-Portraits of the Brain: Cognitive Science, Data Visualization, and Communicating Brain Structure and Function. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (8):462-474.
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  39. Yasufumi Takama & Takashi Yamada (2010). Interactive Information Visualization for Exploratory Analysis of Spatiotemporal Trend Information. Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 25:58-67.
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  40.  30
    Agustin A. Araya (2003). The Hidden Side of Visualization. Techne 7 (2):74-119.
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  41.  93
    Leon Horsten & Irina Starikova (2010). Mathematical Knowledge: Intuition, Visualization, and Understanding. Topoi 29 (1):1-2.
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  42. Marcus Giaquinto (2008). Visualization. In Paolo Mancosu (ed.), The Philosophy of Mathematical Practice. OUP Oxford
     
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  43.  10
    Agustin A. Araya (2003). The Hidden Side of Visualization. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 7 (2):74-119.
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  44.  14
    Donna J. Cox (2004). The Art and Science of Visualization: Metaphorical Maps and Cultural Models. Technoetic Arts 2 (2):71-80.
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  45. Tsuneaki Kato & Mitsunori Matsushita (2007). Multi-Modal Interface for Information Access Through Extraction and Visualization of Time-Series Information. Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 22:553-562.
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  46.  26
    Jean Paul Van Bendegem (2006). Review of P. Mancosu, K. F. Jørgensen, and S. A. Pedersen (Eds.), Visualization, Explanation and Reasoning Styles in Mathematics. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 14 (3):378-391.
    What is philosophy of mathematics and what is it about? The most popular answer, I suppose, to this question would be that philosophers should provide a justification for our presently most cherished mathematical theories and for the most important tool to develop such theories, namely logico-mathematical proof. In fact, it does cover a large part of the activity of philosophers that think about mathematics. Discussions about the merits and faults of classical logic versus one or other ‘deviant’ logics as the (...)
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  47.  24
    Jon Barwise & John Etchemendy (1998). Computers, Visualization, and the Nature of Reasoning. In Terrell Ward Bynum & James Moor (eds.), The Digital Phoenix: How Computers Are Changing Philosophy. Blackwell Publishers 93--116.
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  48. David C. Gooding (2005). Seeing the Forest for the Trees: Visualization, Cognition, and Scientific Inference. In M. Gorman, R. Tweney, D. Gooding & A. Kincannon (eds.), Scientific and Technological Thinking. Erlbaum 2005--173.
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  49. Ivo Jirasek (2010). The Sense of the Visualisation of the Human Body: The Varied Meanings of Nudity. Filosoficky Casopis 58 (6):863-883.
     
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  50.  1
    Henk W. de Regt (2001). Spacetime Visualisation and the Intelligibility of Physical Theories. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 32 (2):243-265.
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