5 found
Order:
  1.  20
    Risk of Death or Life-Threatening Injury for Women with Children Not Sired by the Abuser.Emily J. Miner, Todd K. Shackelford, Carolyn Rebecca Block, Valerie G. Starratt & Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (1):89-97.
    Women who are abused by their male intimate partners incur many costs, ranging in severity from fleeting physical pain to death. Previous research has linked the presence of children sired by a woman’s previous partner to increased risk of woman abuse and to increased risk of femicide. The current research extends this work by securing data from samples of 111 unabused women, 111 less severely abused women, 128 more severely abused women, and 26 victims of intimate partner femicide from the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  19
    Threat Simulation, Dreams, and Domain-Specificity.Todd K. Shackelford & Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1004-1004.
    According to Revonsuo, dreams are the output of a evolved “threat simulation mechanism.” The author marshals a diverse and comprehensive array of empirical and theoretical support for this hypothesis. We propose that the hypothesized threat simulation mechanism might be more domain-specific in design than the author implies. To illustrate, we discuss the possible sex-differentiated design of the hypothesized threat simulation mechanism. [Revonsuo].
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  26
    Romantic Jealousy in Early Adulthood and in Later Life.Todd K. Shackelford, Martin Voracek, David P. Schmitt, David M. Buss, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford & Richard L. Michalski - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (3):283-300.
    Young men are more distressed by a partner’s sexual infidelity, whereas young women are more distressed by a partner’s emotional infidelity. The present research investigated (a) whether the sex difference in jealousy replicates in an older sample, and (b) whether younger people differ from older people in their selection of the more distressing infidelity scenario. We presented forced-choice dilemmas to 202 older people (mean age = 67 years) and to 234 younger people (mean age = 20 years). The sex difference (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  20
    Female Coital Orgasm and Male Attractiveness.Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford, Gregory J. LeBlanc, April L. Bleske, Harald A. Euler & Sabine Hoier - 2000 - Human Nature 11 (3):299-306.
    Female coital orgasm may be an adaptation for preferentially retaining the sperm of males with “good genes.” One indicator of good genes may be physical attractiveness. Accordingly, R. Thornhill, S. W. Gangestad, and R. Comer (1995) found that women mated to more attractive men reported an orgasm during a greater proportion of copulations than did women mated to less attractive men. The current research replicates this finding, with several design variations. We collected self-report data from 388 women residing in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Mothers and Fathers Perform More Mate Retention Behaviors Than Individuals Without Children.Nicole Barbaro, Todd K. Shackelford & Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (3):316-333.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark