7 found
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  1.  28
    Mark Currie, The Unexpected: Narrative Temporality and the Philosophy of Surprise. Reviewed By.Vladimir Rizov - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (1):4-6.
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  2.  17
    Fredric Jameson, Raymond Chandler: The Detections of Totality. Reviewed By.Vladimir Rizov - 2017 - Philosophy in Review 37 (1):17-19.
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  3.  14
    Gerhard Richter, Inheriting Walter Benjamin. Reviewed By.Vladimir Rizov - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (5):220-222.
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  4.  12
    The Future, by Marc Augé. [REVIEW]Vladimir Rizov - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (2):44-46.
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  5.  9
    Paolo Virno, Deja Vu and the End of History. Reviewed By.Vladimir Rizov - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (5):281-283.
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  6.  3
    Eugène Atget and Documentary Photography of the City.Vladimir Rizov - 2021 - Theory, Culture and Society 38 (3):141-163.
    This paper focuses on the documentary photography of Eugène Atget in late 19th and early 20th-century Paris. I will begin by exploring Atget’s position as a pioneering documentary photographer in the field, followed by an engagement with the urban environment of Paris, in which Atget worked almost exclusively. Finally, I will analyse a single photograph in depth while discussing it in relation to the work of Charles Baudelaire and Jacques Rancière. This text is a contribution to a literature of critical (...)
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  7.  1
    Narrative Redemption: A Commentary of McGregor's Narrative Justice.Vladimir Rizov - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (4):26.
    Rafe McGregor's Narrative Justice provides a powerful argument for the merit of an education by and through aesthetics as a way of challenging criminal inhumanity. As a work at the intersection of critical criminology and philosophy, it is a challenging and thoughtful articulation of the criminological imagination.1 Ultimately, McGregor's argument highlights the possibility of a political education through aesthetic engagement. The exemplary narratives that McGregor uses are varied and richly evocative. My commentary on the book is in keeping with this (...)
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