Results for 'Volitional Incapacity'

440 found
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  1.  74
    Ability and Volitional Incapacity.Nicholas Southwood & Pablo Gilabert - 2016 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 10.
    The conditional analysis of ability faces familiar counterexamples involving cases of volitional incapacity. An interesting response to the problem of volitional incapacity is to try to explain away the responses elicited by such counterexamples by distinguishing between what we are able to do and what we are able to bring ourselves to do. We argue that this error-theoretic response fails. Either it succeeds in solving the problem of volitional incapacity at the cost of making (...)
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  2. Moral Judgment and Volitional Incapacity.Antti Kauppinen - 2010 - In Michael O'Rourke (ed.), Topics in Contemporary Philosophy vol. 7. MIT Press.
    The central question of the branch of metaethics we may call philosophical moral psychology concerns the nature or essence of moral judgment: what is it to think that something is right or wrong, good or bad, obligatory or forbidden? One datum in this inquiry is that sincerely held moral views appear to influence conduct: on the whole, people do not engage in behaviours they genuinely consider base or evil, sometimes even when they would stand to benefit from it personally. Moral (...)
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  3.  82
    'To Thine Own Self Be True': On the Loss of Integrity as a Kind of Suffering.Henri Wijsbek - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (1):1-7.
    One of the requirements in the Dutch regulation for euthanasia and assisted suicide is that the doctor must be satisfied ‘that the patient's suffering is unbearable, and that there is no prospect of improvement.’ In the notorious Chabot case, a psychiatrist assisted a 50 year old woman in suicide, although she did not suffer from any somatic disease, nor strictly speaking from any psychiatric condition. In Seduced by Death, Herbert Hendin concluded that apparently the Dutch regulation now allows physicians to (...)
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  4.  66
    The Relevance of Human Nature.Nicholas Southwood - 2015 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 9.
    The so-called "Human Nature Constraint" holds that if an agent is unable, due to features of human nature, to bring herself to act in a certain way, then this suffices to block or negate the claim that the agent is required to act in that way. David Estlund (2011) has recently mounted a forceful objection to the Human Nature Constraint. I argue that Estlund’s objection fails – but instructively, in a way that gives Estlund resources for a different way of (...)
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  5.  32
    Moral Heroism and the Requirement Claim.Kyle Fruh - 2014 - Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (1):93-104.
    Acts of moral heroism are often described by heroes as having been in some sense or another required. Here I elaborate two rival strategies for accounting for what I call the requirement claim. The first, originating with J.O. Urmson, attempts to explain away the phenomenon. The second and more popular among moralists is to treat the requirement claim as a moment of moral insight and to make sense of it in terms of moral duty. I argue that both of these (...)
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  6. ``Heart'' Attack: A Critique of Jorge Garcia's Volitional Conception of Racism. [REVIEW]Charles W. Mills - 2003 - The Journal of Ethics 7 (1):29-62.
    Since its original 1996 publication,Jorge Garcia''s ``The Heart of Racism'''' has beenwidely reprinted, a testimony to its importanceas a distinctive and original analysis ofracism. Garcia shifts the standard framework ofdiscussion from the socio-political to theethical, and analyzes racism as essentially avice. He represents his account asnon-revisionist (capturing everyday usage),non-doxastic (not relying on belief),volitional (requiring ill-will), and moralized(racism is always wrong). In this paper, Icritique Garcia''s analysis, arguing that hedoes in fact revise everyday usage, that hisaccount does tacitly rely on (...)
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  7.  7
    Alternative Possibilities, Volitional Necessities, and Character Setting.Benjamin Matheson - 2017 - Disputatio 9 (45):287-307.
    Conventional wisdom suggests that the power to do otherwise is necessary for being morally responsible. While much of the literature on alternative possibilities has focused on Frankfurt’s argument against this claim, I instead focus on one of Dennett’s (1984) arguments against it. This argument appeals to cases of volitional necessity rather than cases featuring counterfactual interveners. van Inwagen (1989) and Kane (1996) appeal to the notion of ‘character setting’ to argue that these cases do not show that the power (...)
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  8.  19
    Action: Volitional Disorder and Addiction.Alfred R. Mele - 2004 - In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford University Press. pp. 78.
    Weakness of will has perplexed philosophers since Plato's time. This chapter places some of the literature on volitional disorders and addictions in a philosophical context dating back to Plato and Aristotle in an attempt to shed light on issues that a theorist who wishes to analyze the idea of a volitional disorder will face. Key here is the notion of the irresistability and resistability of pertinent desires, which is explored in relation to George Ainslie's work on the ability (...)
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  9.  28
    Reactive Attitudes and Volitional Necessity.Neal A. Tognazzini - 2014 - Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (4):677-689.
    In this paper I argue that Harry Frankfurt's work (both on volitional necessity and on Descartes) can help us to understand the argument that is at the heart of P. F. Strawson's classic article, "Freedom and Resentment". Strawson seems to say that it is both idle and irrelevant to ask whether the participant attitude (the framework within which we see others as morally responsible agents) is justified, but many have been puzzled by these remarks. In this paper I contend (...)
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  10.  4
    Affective, Volitional and Galvanic Factors in Learning.E. R. Balken - 1933 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 16 (1):115.
  11.  3
    Some Volitional Patterns Revealed by the Will-Profile.June E. Downey - 1920 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 3 (4):281.
  12.  2
    Sufficient Reason: Volitional Pragmatism and the Meaning of Economic Institutions.Daniel W. Bromley - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    In the standard analysis of economic institutions--which include social conventions, the working rules of an economy, and entitlement regimes --economists invoke the same theories they use when analyzing individual behavior. In this profoundly innovative book, Daniel Bromley challenges these theories, arguing instead for "volitional pragmatism" as a plausible way of thinking about the evolution of economic institutions. Economies are always in the process of becoming. Here is a theory of how they become. Bromley argues that standard economic accounts see (...)
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  13. Caring and Incapacity.Jeffrey Seidman - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 147 (2):301 - 322.
    This essay seeks to explain a morally important class of psychological incapacity—the class of what Bernard Williams has called “incapacities of character.” I argue for two main claims: (1) Caring is the underlying psychological disposition that gives rise to incapacities of character. (2) In competent, rational adults, caring is, in part, a cognitive and deliberative disposition. Caring is a mental state which disposes an agent to believe certain considerations to be good reasons for deliberation and action. And caring is (...)
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  14.  33
    Making Room for Children's Autonomy: Maria Montessori's Case for Seeing Children's Incapacity for Autonomy as an External Failing.Patrick R. Frierson - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):332-350.
    This article draws on Martha Nussbaum's distinction between basic, internal, and external capacities to better specify possible locations for children's ‘incapacity’ for autonomy. I then examine Maria Montessori's work on what she calls ‘normalization’, which involves a release of children's capacities for autonomy and self-governance made possible by being provided with the right kind of environment. Using Montessori, I argue that, in contrast to many ordinary and philosophical assumptions, children's incapacities for autonomy are best understood as consequences of an (...)
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  15.  3
    Faith, Belief, and Will: Toward a Volitional Stance Theory of Faith.Robert Audi - forthcoming - Sophia:1-14.
    The point of departure of this paper is a conception of faith that is broader than traditional conceptions on which it is essentially doxastic. On the theory presupposed here, neither propositional faith nor attitudinal faith entails belief. Faith is also irreducible to hope, though it is not without some kinship to it. More positively, on the view presented here, faith entails a set of positive attitudes of a certain kind. This positive element makes it natural to consider faith a kind (...)
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  16.  21
    Incapacity to Give Informed Consent Owing to Mental Disorder.C. W. van Staden - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (1):41-43.
    What renders some mentally disordered patients incapable of informed consent to medical interventions? It is argued that a patient is incapable of giving informed consent owing to mental disorder, if a mental disorder prevents a patient from understanding what s/he consents to; if a mental disorder prevents a patient from choosing decisively; if a mental disorder prevents a patient from communicating his/her consent; or if a mental disorder prevents a patient from accepting the need for a medical intervention. This paper (...)
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  17.  45
    Moral Incapacity and Huckleberry Finn.Craig Taylor - 2001 - Ratio 14 (1):56–67.
    Bernard Williams distinguishes moral incapacities – incapacities that are themselves an expression of the moral life – from mere psychological ones in terms of deliberation. Against Williams I claim there are examples of such moral incapacity where no possible deliberation is involved – that an agent's incapacity may be a primitive feature or fact about their life. However Michael Clark argues that my claim here leaves the distinction between moral and psychological incapacity unexplained, and that an adequate (...)
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  18.  19
    Conscience, Volitional Necessity, and Religious Exemptions.Andrew Koppelman - 2009 - Legal Theory 15 (3):215.
    Why do we grant religious exemptions? Many distinguished scholars and judges have been drawn to the idea that conscience is entitled to special protection, because a person in its grip cannot obey the law without betraying his deepest, most identity-defining commitments. The weakness of this justification is shown by philosopher Harry Frankfurt's account of what he calls “volitional necessity,” which clarifies the structure of the argument that invocations of conscience imply. Frankfurt shows that a person can be bound in (...)
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  19.  30
    Being Amoral. Psychopathy and Moral Incapacity, Thomas Schramme. [REVIEW]Hanno Sauer - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (2):425-427.
    Philosophers and psychologists love psychopaths. They seem like a test case which was tailor-made for them to probe their most contested claims and theories. What is the psychological basis of moral judgment? Are moral beliefs intrinsically motivational? How should psychological disorders be defined, if they should be defined at all? Under what conditions can agents be reasonably held responsible for their conduct?Being Amoral. Psychopathy and Moral Incapacity, edited by Thomas Schramme brings together some of the world’s leading experts on (...)
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  20.  29
    Volitional Excuses, Self-Narration, and Blame.Marion Smiley - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (1):85-101.
    “I didn’t know what I was doing”. “I was totally out of control.” Since we accept and reject such excuses all the time in practice—and frequently do so with great confidence—we might be expected to have grasped what it means for a volitional excuse to be valid in general and to have developed a well thought out set of criteria for judging the validity of such excuses in practice. But, as it turns out, we have not done either of (...)
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  21.  49
    Hans-Georg Gadamer “the Incapacity for Conversation” (1972).David Vessey & Chris Blauwkamp - 2006 - Continental Philosophy Review 39 (4):351-359.
    In his 1972 essay “The Incapacity for Conversation” (“Die Unfähigkeit zum Gespräch”) Gadamer takes up the question of whether changes in society have made it such that we are losing our ability to participate in dialogue. By the end of the essay he argues that this is not the case and that the claim that someone is incapable of dialogue is merely an excuse for not listening to the other person. Over the course of the essay Gadamer provides a (...)
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  22. Fear of Mechanism. A Compatibilist Critique of ‘The Volitional Brain’.T. Clark - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):279-293.
    This article reviews contributions to The Volitional Brain, some of which defend a libertarian, contra-causal account of free will, while others take a so-called compatibilist view, in which adequate conceptions of human liberty and moral responsibility are claimed to be compatible with naturalistic causality. Siding with compatibilism, this review finds that defenders of libertarian free will place undue weight on the first person feeling of freedom, while discounting scientific evidence that human choices are fully a function of antecedent causes (...)
     
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  23.  6
    Moral Incapacity and Huckleberry Finn.Craig Taylor - 2001 - Ratio 14 (1):56-67.
    Bernard Williams distinguishes moral incapacities – incapacities that are themselves an expression of the moral life – from mere psychological ones in terms of deliberation. Against Williams I claim there are examples of such moral incapacity where no possible deliberation is involved – that an agent's incapacity may be a primitive feature or fact about their life. However Michael Clark argues that my claim here leaves the distinction between moral and psychological incapacity unexplained, and that an adequate (...)
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  24.  20
    Volitional Disability and Physician Attitudes Toward Noncompliance.J. Bergen - 1984 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (4).
    We develop the concept of a volitional disability as an aid in understanding those patients who behave in ways that are harmful to themselves in spite of their desire to do otherwise. Using this concept enables us to describe their behavior as intentional but ‘unvoluntary’. We demonstrate the clinical reality of such behavior by giving clinical examples of the behavior of those with phobic, compulsive, and addictive disorders. We then attempt to show how some kinds of self-harming behavior of (...)
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  25.  20
    Volitional Control in the Learning of Artificial Grammars.Peter A. Bibby & Geoffrey Underwood - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):757-758.
    Dienes & Perner argue that volitional control in artificial grammar learning is best understood in terms of the distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge representations. We maintain that direct, explicit access to knowledge organised in a hierarchy of implicitness/explicitness is neither necessary nor sufficient to explain volitional control. People can invoke volitional control when their knowledge is implicit, as in the case of artificial grammar learning, and they can invoke volitional control when any part of their (...)
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  26.  15
    Psychological Incapacity and Moral Incontinence.Bruce B. Settle - 1986 - Philosophy Research Archives 12:87-99.
    Moral incontinence (that is, knowing what one ought to do but doing otherwise) has often been explained in terms of psychological incapacity/inability (that is, “ought but can’t”). However, Socrates and others have argued that, whenever it is physically possible to act, there can be no rupture between judgment and behavior and therefore there are no instances of “ought but can’t”.The analysis that follows will conclude either that Socrates was correct in holding that there are no ruptures between judgment and (...)
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  27.  8
    Volitional Disability and Physician Attitudes Toward Noncompliance.R. B. Ferrell, T. R. P. Price, B. Gert & B. J. Bergen - 1984 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (4):333-352.
    We develop the concept of a volitional disability as an aid in understanding those patients who behave in ways that are harmful to themselves in spite of their desire to do otherwise. Using this concept enables us to describe their behavior as intentional but ‘unvoluntary’. We demonstrate the clinical reality of such behavior by giving clinical examples of the behavior of those with phobic, compulsive, and addictive disorders. We then attempt to show how some kinds of self-harming behavior of (...)
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  28.  16
    Memorial States of Awareness Versus Volitional Control: The Role of Task Differences.Sachiko Kinoshita - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):772-772.
    Dienes & Perner's analysis provides a clear theoretical justification for using a demonstration of volitional control as a criterion for conscious awareness. However, in memory tasks, the converse does not hold: A phenomenological awareness of a memory episode can arise involuntarily, even when the task does not require retrieval of the episode. The varying amounts of volitional retrieval required by different memory tasks need to be recognized.
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  29.  4
    The Mediation Effect of Response Expectancies Between Religious Coping and Non-Volitional Responses in Patients with Breast Cancer.Aurelian I. Bizo, Adrian N. Opre & Alina S. Rusu - 2014 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 13 (39):181-202.
    Even though there are several studies showing a clear connection between religious coping and distress, only few of them illustrate models of mediation between religious coping and its psychological effects. In this paper we investigate the mediation effect that response expectancies have in the relation between religious coping and non-volitional responses . The study was made on 38 females diagnosed with breast cancer and which were following a treatment with radiotherapy sessions. The results confirmed the presence of a mediation (...)
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  30.  2
    Volitional Consciousness and Evolution.Shawn E. Klein - 2013 - In Stephen Dilley (ed.), Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books. pp. 237.
    Classical Liberalism is a view that the only justifiable restraints on the actions and choices of individuals in political orders are ones necessary to preserve individual liberty. Central to this view of liberty is the individual being left free from coercive interference from other individuals and society as a whole. This view presumes the idea that the individual is, firstly, able to choose his ends and actions, and secondly, that the individual is the best judge of these. Thus, the individualism (...)
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  31.  20
    Incapacity and Care: Controversies in Healthcare and Research.Helen Watt (ed.) - 2009 - Linacre Centre.
    What are the duties of carers and health professionals to people with mental incapacity? How ought we to think about the ethical and legal issues? What can any of us do to improve and safeguard the lives of those cared for? This book seeks to examine in detail and find ethically robust answers to such questions. Among the topics discussed are withholding treatment, tube-feeding patients with dementia, the 'persistent vegetative state', medical research, and sterilisation of intellectually disabled adults. Contributors (...)
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  32.  41
    The Complex Tapestry of Free Will: Striving Will, Indeterminism and Volitional Streams.Robert Kane - forthcoming - Synthese:1-16.
    The aim of this paper is to respond to recent discussion of, and objections to, the libertarian view of free will I have developed in many works over the past four decades. The issues discussed all have a bearing on the central question of how one might make sense of a traditional free will requiring indeterminism in the light of modern science. This task involves, among other things, avoiding all traditional libertarian appeals to unusual forms of agency or causation that (...)
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  33.  10
    Volitional Facilitation of Difficult Intentions: Joint Activation of Intention Memory and Positive Affect Removes Stroop Interference.Julius Kuhl & Miguel Kazen - 1999 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 128 (3):382.
  34.  52
    Being Amoral. Psychopathy and Moral Incapacity.Thomas Schramme (ed.) - 2014 - MIT Press.
    Psychopathy has been the subject of investigations in both philosophy and psychiatry and yet the conceptual issues remain largely unresolved. This volume approaches psychopathy by considering the question of what psychopaths lack. The contributors investigate specific moral dysfunctions or deficits, shedding light on the capacities people need to be moral by examining cases of real people who seem to lack those capacities. -/- The volume proceeds from the basic assumption that psychopathy is not characterized by a single deficit--for example, the (...)
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  35.  85
    The Final Incapacity: Peirce on Intuition and the Continuity of Mind and Matter, Part I.Robert Lane - 2011 - Cognitio 12 (1).
    This is the first of two papers that examine Charles Peirce’s denial that human beings have a faculty of intuition. The semiotic and epistemo-logical aspects of that denial are well-known. My focus is on its neglected metaphysical aspect, which I argue amounts to the doctrine that there is no determinate boundary between the internal world of the cognizing subject and the external world that the subject cognizes. In the second paper, I will argue that the “objective idealism” of Peirce’s 1890s (...)
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  36. Volitional Necessity and Volitional Shift: A Key to Sobriety?John Talmadge - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):327-330.
  37.  2
    Respectful Agents: Between the Scylla and Charybdis of Cultural and Moral Incapacity.Michelle Schut & René Moelker - 2015 - Journal of Military Ethics 14 (3-4):232-246.
    ABSTRACTRespect in morally and culturally critical situations during military missions is complex and loaded with ambiguity. Respect seems a desirable and positive cross-cultural competence. It is assumed and expected that respectful action serves the objectives of the mission and contributes to the perceived legitimacy of the military. However, by respecting ‘the others’ culture’ too much, one can neglect one's own values and sideline one's own ethical point of view. We conducted a qualitative study in which we extracted 121 morally and (...)
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  38.  87
    Moral Incapacity.Bernard Williams - 1992 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 93:59-70.
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  39.  89
    The Volitional Brain: Towards a Neuroscience of Free Will.Benjamin W. Libet, Anthony Freeman & Keith Sutherland - 1999 - Imprint Academic.
    It is widely accepted in science that the universe is a closed deterministic system in which everything can, ultimately, be explained by purely physical...
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  40.  82
    The Final Incapacity: Peirce on Intuition and the Continuity of Mind and Matter, Part II.Robert Lane - 2011 - Cognitio 12 (2):237-256.
    This is the second of two papers that examine Charles Peirce’s denial that human beings have a faculty of intuition. In the first paper, I argued that in its metaphysical aspect, Peirce’s denial of intuition amounts to the doctrine that there is no determinate boundary between the internal world of the cognizing subject and the external world that the subject cognizes.In the present paper, I argue that, properly understood, the “objective idealism” of Peirce’s 1890s cosmological series is a more general (...)
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  41.  5
    IV—Moral Incapacity.Bernard Williams - 1993 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 93 (1):59-70.
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  42.  3
    Improved Volitional Recall of Motor-Imagery-Related Brain Activation Patterns Using Real-Time Functional MRI-Based Neurofeedback.Epifanio Bagarinao, Akihiro Yoshida, Mika Ueno, Kazunori Terabe, Shohei Kato, Haruo Isoda & Toshiharu Nakai - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  43.  18
    Moral Incapacity.Craig Taylor - 1995 - Philosophy 70 (272):273 - 285.
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  44.  15
    Anxiety Impairs Inhibitory Control but Not Volitional Action Control.Tahereh L. Ansari & Nazanin Derakshan - 2010 - Cognition and Emotion 24 (2):241-254.
  45.  45
    Mental Incapacity: Some Proposals for Legislative Reform.J. V. McHale - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (5):322-327.
    While the decision of the House of Lords in Re F in [1990] clarified somewhat the law concerning the treatment of the mentally incapacitated adult, many uncertainties remained. This paper explores proposals discussed in a recent government green paper for reform of the law in an area involving many difficult ethical dilemmas.
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  46.  20
    Knowledge, Volitional Agency and Causation in Malebranche and Geulincx.Steven Nadler - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):263 – 274.
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  47.  42
    Voluntary Exertion of the Body: A Volitional Account.Carl Ginet - 1986 - Theory and Decision 20 (3):223-45.
  48.  40
    Moral Incapacity and Deliberation.Michael Clark - 1999 - Ratio 12 (1):1–13.
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  49.  25
    Value-Free Science, Policy Advocacy, and Volitional Pragmatism. Brister - 2015 - The Pluralist 10 (1):23.
    Among other things, the philosophical tradition of pragmatism provides a theory of inquiry and a theory of collective action. The theory of inquiry frames how humans investigate their problems and devise solutions; the theory of collective action frames how we work together to implement solutions to shared problems. Though philosophical, pragmatism aims to integrate philosophy and practice by developing theory that is useful for solving the problems that press on people’s lives. In spite of this intention, and perhaps because of (...)
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  50.  2
    The Effects of Neurochemical Balance in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex on Volitional Control Under Irrelevant Distraction.Ai Koizumi, Hakwan Lau, Yasuhiro Shimada & Hirohito M. Kondo - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 59:104-111.
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