23 found
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  1. Are 'Old Wives' Tales' Justified.Vrinda Dalmiya & Linda Alcoff - 1993 - In Linda Alcoff & Elizabeth Potter (eds.), Feminist Epistemologies. Routledge. pp. 217--244.
     
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  2.  14
    Caring to Know: Comparative Care Ethics, Feminist Epistemology, and the Mahābhārata.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2016 - Oxford University Press India.
    The manuscript explores the plausibility of care-based epistemology in a comparative key. Investigating the epistemic virtue of care-giving, the work weaves together insights from care ethics, virtue epistemology and a particular reading of the Mah=abh=arata which, left to themselves, do not appear compatible with one another. Drawing on these traditions, the work goes on to provide a feminist vision of search for truth that is consistent with both ethical relations and interventions for justice.
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  3.  29
    Why Should a Knower Care?Vrinda Dalmiya - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):34-52.
    This paper argues that the concept of care is significant not only for ethics, but for epistemology as well. After elucidating caring as a five-step dyadic relation, I go on to show its epistemic significance within the general framework of virtue epistemology as developed by Ernest Sosa, Alvin Goldman, and Linda Zagzebski. The notions of “care-knowing” and “care-based epistemology” emerge from construing caring as a reliabilist and responsibilist virtue.
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  4.  14
    Caring to Know: Response to Commentators.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (3):879-899.
    It is a privilege to have such extensive engagement with one's work as in the responses of Linda Alcoff, Eva Kittay, Keya Maitra, and Nilanjan Das. I am sincerely thankful for the intellectual generosity and thoughtfulness of their critiques. Before responding to their specific concerns, however, I lay out the general argument of Caring to Know in broad strokes to serve as the common backdrop to their comments.The central idea of Caring to Know is that notions of 'knowing well' are (...)
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  5. Why Should a Knower Care?Vrinda Dalmiya - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):34--52.
    This paper argues that the concept of care is significant not only for ethics, but for epistemology as well. After elucidating caring as a five-step dyadic relation, I go on to show its epistemic significance within the general framework of virtue epistemology as developed by Ernest Sosa, Alvin Goldman, and Linda Zagzebski. The notions of "care-knowing" and "care-based epistemology" emerge from construing caring (respectively) as a reliabilist and responsibilist virtue.
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  6.  55
    Caring Comparisons: Thoughts on Comparative Care Ethics.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):192-209.
  7.  40
    Coherence, Truth and the `Omniscient Interpreter'.Vrinda Dalmiya - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (158):86-94.
  8.  11
    Knowing People.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2001 - In Matthias Steup (ed.), Knowledge, Truth, and Duty: Essays on Epistemic Justification, Responsibility, and Virtue. Oxford University Press.
    Makes a case for redirecting epistemology by basing it on a virtue approach and the method of care. According to virtue epistemology, what confers epistemic value are properties of the epistemic subject: his or her epistemic character, belief‐forming habits, and cognitive dispositions. The method of care is a complex, interactive process of acquiring justified beliefs or knowledge, a process that integrates the subject into a social and ethical context. Starting out with a discussion of knowledge of other minds, the writer (...)
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  9. Loving Paradoxes: A Feminist Reclamation of the Goddess Kali.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (1):125-150.
    : The feminist significance of the Goddess Kali lies in an indigenous worshipful attitude of "Kali-bhakti" rather than in the mere image of the Goddess. The peculiar mother-child motif at the core of the poet Ramprasad Sen's Kali-bhakti represents, I argue, not only a dramatic reconstruction of femininity but of selfhood in general. The spiritual goal of a devotee here involves a deconstruction of "master identity" necessary also for ethico-political struggles for justice.
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  10.  20
    Loving Paradoxes: A Feminist Reclamation of the Goddess Kali.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (1):125-150.
    The feminist significance of the Goddess Kali lies in an indigenous worshipful attitude of “Kali-bhakti” rather than in the mere image of the Goddess. The peculiar mother-child motif at the core of the poet Ramprasad Sen's Kali-bhakti represents, I argue, not only a dramatic reconstruction of femininity but of selfhood in general. The spiritual goal of a devotee here involves a deconstruction of “master identity” necessary also for ethico-political struggles for justice.
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  11.  28
    Particularizing the Moral Self: A Feminist Buddhist Exchange. [REVIEW]Vrinda Dalmiya - 2001 - Sophia 40 (1):61-72.
    Many thanks to Mark Siderits for extended conversations and comments. Also to Arindam Chakrabarti.
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  12.  73
    The Metaphysics of Ethical Love: Comparing Practical Vedanta and Feminist Ethics.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2009 - Sophia 48 (3):221-235.
    In this paper I compare two very different deployments of love in ethics. Swami Vivekananda's concept of ethical love ties into the project of constructing an alternative masculinity for a colonized people; while feminist care ethics uses love to escape the perceived masculinity of traditional ethical theory. Using Kenneth Goodpaster's distinction between ‘framework questions’ and ‘application questions,’ I try to show that love in Practical Vedanta addresses the former while feminist care ethics concerns itself with the latter. Even though this (...)
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  13.  27
    Rethinking the Indian ‘Renaissance Modernity’: Comments on Nalini Bhusan and Jay Garfield’s Minds Without Fear.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2019 - Sophia 58 (1):7-11.
    This is a comment on Minds Without Fear.
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  14. Exploring Agency in the Mahabharata: Ethical and Political Dimensions of Dharma.Sibesh Chandra Bhattacharya & Vrinda Dalmiya - 2018 - Routledge India.
    The Mahabharata, one of the major epics of India, is a sourcebook complete by itself as well as an open text constantly under construction. This volume looks at transactions between its modern discourses and ancient vocabulary. Located amid conversations between these two conceptual worlds, the volume grapples with the epic's problematisation of dharma or righteousness, and consequently, of the ideal person and the good life through a cluster of issues surrounding the concept of agency and action. Drawing on several interdisciplinary (...)
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  15. Epistemological Arguments Against the External World.Vrinda Dalmiya - 1988 - Dissertation, Brown University
    This dissertation attempts to defend the justifiability of our belief that there is an external world. I begin by investigating what such a claim means and how it fits in with a common sense "realism." The idea put forth is that the latter asserts not only that there is an external world but also what there is in it. So, the bare assertion about the existence of the external world is only a part of common sense. However, I claim that (...)
     
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  16. L’Éthique du Care En Situation de Pandémie : Quels Changements Possibles?Vrinda Dalmiya & Brigitte Rollet - 2021 - Diogène 1:138-157.
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  17.  18
    A Case of Relational Autonomy in the Mahābhārata : The Story of Pūjanī.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2019 - Sophia 58 (2):239-254.
    The dialogue between Pūjanī and Brahmadatta is a lesser known episode in the Mahābhārata. This paper explores how Pūjanī’s voice is relevant when rethinking autonomy for feminist relational selves. I first unravel the different ‘stories’ that can be told through this single but multi-layered narrative. Then, by re-arranging their insights and using the idea of ‘normative authority’ proposed by Catriona Mackenzie, I piece together a picture of autonomy foregrounding dependence on others and volatile emotionality––both of which are generally thought to (...)
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  18.  30
    From Good Knowers to Just Knowers in the Mahãbhãrata : Towards a Comparative Virtue Epistemology.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:195-220.
    Adopting the framework of Anglo Analytic Virtue Epistemology, I ask of the Sanskrit epic, the Mahrata, the question: What sort of character or must a have? Then, inspired by broadly feminist sensibilities, I raise the concern whether dispositions for knowing the world can be associated with motivations to rectify injustices in that world just knower.virtues of truth’ in the epic to see whether they can establish a connection between knowing and justice.
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  19. India : In the Battlefield of Dharma : The Moral Philosophy of the Bhagavad Gita.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2009 - In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press.
     
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  20.  9
    Cows and Others: Toward Constructing Ecofeminist Selves.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (2):149-168.
    I examine the kind of alliances and ironic crossing of borders that constitute an ecofeminist subjectivity by appeal to a postcolonial literary imagination and ahistorical philosophical argumentation. I link the theoretical insights of a modern short story “Bestiality” with a concept of “congenital debt” found in the ancient Vedic corpus to suggest a notion of ecological selfhood that transforms into the idea of a “gift community” to encompass nonhumans as well as people on the fringes of society, but without the (...)
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  21.  63
    Why Is Sexual Harassment Wrong?Vrinda Dalmiya - 1999 - Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (1):46-64.
  22.  1
    Chapter Seven. “Epistemic Multiculturalism” and Objectivity.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2014 - In Jennifer McWeeny & Ashby Butnor (eds.), Asian and Feminist Philosophies in Dialogue: Liberating Traditions. Columbia University Press. pp. 167-184.
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  23.  45
    Cows and Others: Toward Constructing Ecofeminist Selves.Vrinda Dalmiya - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (2):149-168.
    I examine the kind of alliances and ironic crossing of borders that constitute an ecofeminist subjectivity by appeal to a postcolonial literary imagination and ahistorical philosophical argumentation. I link the theoretical insights of a modern short story “Bestiality” with a concept of “congenital debt” found in the ancient Vedic corpus to suggest a notion of ecological selfhood that transforms into the idea of a “gift community” to encompass nonhumans as well as people on the fringes of society, but without the (...)
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