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William Child
Oxford University
  1. Causality, Interpretation, and the Mind.William Child - 1994 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Philosophers of mind have long been interested in the relation between two ideas: that causality plays an essential role in our understanding of the mental; and that we can gain an understanding of belief and desire by considering the ascription of attitudes to people on the basis of what they say and do. Many have thought that those ideas are incompatible. William Child argues that there is in fact no tension between them, and that we should accept both. He shows (...)
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  2.  15
    Articulating Reasons: An Introduction to Inferentialism.W. Child - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):721-725.
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  3.  6
    Wittgenstein.William Child - 2011 - Routledge.
    Life and works -- The Tractatus, language and logic -- The Tractatus, reality and the limits of language -- From the Tractatus to philosophical investigations -- Intentionality and rule-following -- Mind and psychology -- Knowledge and certainty -- Religion and anthropology -- Legacy and influence.
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  4. Meaning, Use, and Supervenience.William Child - 2019 - In James Conant & Sebastian Sunday Grève (eds.), Wittgenstein on Philosophy, Objectivity, and Meaning. Cambridge University Press. pp. 211-230.
    What is the relation between meaning and use? This chapter first defends a non-reductionist understanding of Wittgenstein’s suggestion that ‘the meaning of a word is its use in the language’; facts about meaning cannot be reduced to, or explained in terms of, facts about use, characterized non-semantically. Nonetheless, it is contended, facts about meaning do supervene on non-semantic facts about use. That supervenience thesis is suggested by comments of Wittgenstein’s and is consistent with his view of meaning and rule-following. Semantic (...)
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  5. Wittgenstein, Seeing-As, and Novelty.William Child - 2018 - In Michael Beaney, Dominic Shaw & Brendan Harrington (eds.), Aspect Perception After Wittgenstein: Seeing-As and Novelty. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 29-48.
    It is natural to say that when we acquire a new concept or concepts, or grasp a new theory, or master a new practice, we come to see things in a new way: we perceive phenomena that we were not previously aware of; we come to see patterns or connections that we did not previously see. That natural idea has been applied in many areas, including the philosophy of science, the philosophy of religion, and the philosophy of language. And, in (...)
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  6.  50
    Economics, Agency, and Causal Explanation.William Child - 2020 - In Peter Róna & László Zsolnai (eds.), Agency and Causal Explanation in Economics. Springer Verlag. pp. 53-67.
    The paper considers three questions. First, what is the connection between economics and agency? It is argued that causation and explanation in economics fundamentally depend on agency. So a philosophical understanding of economic explanation must be sensitive to an understanding of agency. Second, what is the connection between agency and causation? A causal view of agency-involving explanation is defended against a number of arguments from the resurgent noncausalist tradition in the literature on agency and action-explanation. If agency is fundamental to (...)
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  7. Vision and Experience: The Causal Theory and the Disjunctive Conception.William Child - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (168):297-316.
  8.  15
    Wittgenstein: Rethinking the Inner.William Child - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (175):264-266.
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  9.  98
    Anomalism, Uncodifiability, and Psychophysical Relations.William Child - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (2):215-245.
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  10.  78
    Sensations, Natural Properties, and the Private Language Argument.William Child - 2018 - In Kevin Cahill & Thomas Raleigh (eds.), Wittgenstein and Naturalism. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 79-95.
    Wittgenstein’s philosophy involves a general anti-platonism about properties or standards of similarity. On his view, what it is for one thing to have the same property as another is not dictated by reality itself; it depends on our classificatory practices and the standards of similarity they embody. Wittgenstein’s anti-platonism plays an important role in the private language sections and in his discussion of the conceptual problem of other minds. In sharp contrast to Wittgenstein’s views stands the contemporary doctrine of natural (...)
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  11.  92
    Wittgenstein, Scientism, and Anti-Scientism in the Philosophy of Mind.William Child - 2017 - In Jonathan Beale & Ian James Kidd (eds.), Wittgenstein and Scientism. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 81-100.
    Part 1 of this paper sketches Wittgenstein’s opposition to scientism in general. Part 2 explores his opposition to scientism in philosophy focusing, in particular, on philosophy of mind; how must philosophy of mind proceed if it is to avoid the kind of scientism that Wittgenstein complains about? Part 3 examines a central anti-scientistic strand in Wittgenstein’s Last Writings on the Philosophy of Psychology volume II: his treatment of the ‘uncertainty’ of the relation between ‘outer’ behaviour and ‘inner’ experiences and mental (...)
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  12. On the Dualism of Scheme and Content.William Child - 19934 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 94:53-71.
  13. Triangulation: Davidson, Realism and Natural Kinds.William Child - 2001 - Dialectica 55 (1):29-50.
    Is there a plausible middle position in the debate between realists and constructivists about categories or kinds? Such a position may seem to be contained in the account of triangulation that Donald Davidson develops in recent writings. On this account, the kinds we pick out are determined by an interaction between our shared similarity responses and causal relations between us and things in our environment. So kinds and categories are neither imposed on us by the nature of the world, nor (...)
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  14.  61
    Wittgensteinian Themes: Essays in Honour of David Pears.David Francis Pears, David Charles & William Child (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    A stellar group of philosophers offer new works on themes from the great philosophy of Wittgenstein, honoring one of his most eminent interpreters David Pears. This collection covers both the early and the later work of Wittgenstein, relating it to current debates in philosophy. Topics discussed include solipsism, ostension, rules, necessity, privacy, and consciousness.
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  15.  16
    Causality, Interpretation, and the Mind.Supervenience and Mind: Selected Philosophical Essays.William Child & Jaegwon Kim - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (182):136-139.
  16. Wittgenstein's Externalism: Context, Self-Knowledge & the Past.William Child - 2006 - In Tomáš Marvan (ed.), What Determines Content?: The Internalism/Externalism Dispute. Cambridge Scholars Press.
  17.  2
    IV—On the Dualism of Scheme and Content.William Child - 1994 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 94 (1):53-72.
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  18.  44
    Authority and Estrangement: An Essay on Self-Knowledge, by Richard Moran.W. Child - 2009 - Mind 118 (471):850-855.
  19.  77
    Vision and Causation: Reply to Hyman.William Child - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (176):361-369.
  20.  93
    Dreaming, Calculating, Thinking: Wittgenstein and Anti-Realism About the Past.William Child - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (227):252–272.
    For the anti-realist, the truth about a subject's past thoughts and attitudes is determined by what he is subsequently disposed to judge about them. The argument for an anti-realist interpretation of Wittgenstein's view of past-tense statements seems plausible in three cases: dreams, calculating in the head, and thinking. Wittgenstein is indeed an anti-realist about dreaming. His account of calculating in the head suggests anti-realism about the past, but turns out to be essentially realistic. He does not endorse general anti-realism about (...)
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  21.  83
    Memory, Expression, and Past-Tense Self-Knowledge.William Child - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):54–76.
    How should we understand our capacity to remember our past intentional states? And what can we learn from Wittgenstein's treatment of this topic? Three questions are considered. First, what is the relation between our past attitudes and our present beliefs about them? Realism about past attitudes is defended. Second, how should we understand Wittgenstein's view that self-ascriptions of past attitudes are a kind of "response" and that the "language-game" of reporting past attitudes is "the primary thing"? The epistemology and metaphysics (...)
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  22. Davidson on First Person Authority and Knowledge of Meaning.William Child - 2007 - Noûs 41 (2):157–177.
  23.  8
    Memory, Expression, and Past-Tense Self-Knowledge.William Child - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):54-76.
    How should we understand our capacity to remember our past intentional states? And what can we learn from Wittgenstein's treatment of this topic? Three questions are considered. First, what is the relation between our past attitudes and our present beliefs about them? Realism about past attitudes is defended. Second, how should we understand Wittgenstein's view that self-ascriptions of past attitudes are a kind of "response" and that the "language-game" of reporting past attitudes is "the primary thing"? The epistemology and metaphysics (...)
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  24.  48
    Crane on Mental Causation.William Child - 1997 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97 (1):97-102.
  25.  17
    Problems of Vision: Rethinking the Causal Theory of Perception.William Child - 1997 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):729-731.
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  26. Articulating Reasons: An Introduction to Inferentialism. Robert B. Brandom.William Child - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):721-725.
  27.  5
    Book-Reviews. [REVIEW]William Child - 1991 - Mind 100 (397):162-171.
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  28.  16
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]William Child - 1994 - Mind 103 (410):162-171.
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  29. Causation and Interpretation: Some Questions in the Philosophy of Mind.William Child - 1989
  30.  51
    Interpreting People and Interpreting Texts.William Child - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (3):423 – 441.
    What is the relation between interpreting a person's speech and actions, on the one hand, and interpreting a written text, on the other? That question is considered in connection with the theories of interpretation offered by Donald Davidson and Paul Ricoeur. There are some important similarities between those theories. However, it is argued that Davidson and Ricoeur are divided on fundamental questions about the relation between meaning and intention, about the reference of texts, about the relation between the meanings of (...)
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  31.  38
    Does the Tractatus Contain a Private Language Argument?William Child - 2013 - In Peter Sullivan Michael Potter (ed.), Wittgenstein's Tractatus. History and Interpretation. Cambridge: Oxford University Press. pp. 143-169.
    Cora Diamond has claimed that Wittgenstein’s Tractatus contains an early ‘private language argument’: an argument that private objects in other people’s minds can play no role in the language I use for talking about their sensations. She further claims that the Tractatus contains an early version of the later idea that an inner process stands in need of outward criteria. The paper argues against these claims, on the grounds that they depend on an unwarranted construal of the Tractatus’s notion of (...)
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  32.  26
    Monroe Beardsley's Three Criteria for Aesthetic Value: A Neglected Resource in the Evaluation of Recent Music.William C. Child - 2000 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 34 (2):49.
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  33. On Having a Meaning Before One’s Mind.W. Child - 2006 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 25 (1).
  34. Philosophy of Mind. Wittgenstein on the First Person.William Child - 2011 - In Marie McGinn & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. Oxford University Press.
     
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  35.  21
    Problems of Vision: Rethinking the Causal Theory of Perception.William Child - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):729-731.
    Gerald Vision describes and defends a view of visual perception that combines a causal theory of vision with direct realism, and offers novel solutions to a number of traditional puzzles for causal theories. The book contains extensive discussions of the views of many writers—predominantly from the tradition of philosophical work on vision inaugurated by Grice and Strawson. The principal subjects of critical discussion include Searle, Sellars, Peacocke, Lewis, Jackson, Dretske, Armstrong, Heil and Pitcher.
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  36. Remembering Intentions.William Child - 2010 - In Arif Ahmed (ed.), Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  37.  36
    Reply to Alvin I. Goldman.William Child - 2002 - In Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. pp. 45--21.
  38. Reply to Simulation Theory and Mental Concepts.William Child - 2002 - In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.
     
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  39. Simulation and Knowledge of Action.William Child - 2002 - Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
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  40.  42
    'Two Kinds of Use of "I"': The Middle Wittgenstein on 'I' and The Self.William Child - 2018 - In David G. Stern (ed.), Wittgenstein in the 1930s: Between the Tractatus and the Investigations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 141-157.
    The paper discusses two aspects of Wittgenstein’s middle-period discussions of the self and the use of ‘I’. First, it considers the distinction Wittgenstein draws in his 1933 Cambridge lectures between two ‘utterly different’ uses of the word ‘I’. It is shown that Wittgenstein’s discussion describes a number of different and non-equivalent distinctions between uses of ‘I’. It is argued that his claims about some of these distinctions are defensible but that his reasoning in other cases is unconvincing. Second, the paper (...)
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  41.  19
    Tractarian Semantics.The Metaphysics of the Tractatus.William Child & Peter Carruthers - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):354.
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  42. Vision and Causal Understanding.William Child - 2011 - In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press.
     
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  43. “‘We Can Go No Further’: Meaning, Use, and the Limits of Language”.William Child - 2020 - In Hanne Appelqvist (ed.), Wittgenstein and the Limits of Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 93-114.
    A central theme in Wittgenstein’s post-Tractatus remarks on the limits of language is that we ‘cannot use language to get outside language’. One illustration of that idea is his comment that, once we have described the procedure of teaching and learning a rule, we have ‘said everything that can be said about acting correctly according to the rule’; ‘we can go no further’. That, it is argued, is an expression of anti-reductionism about meaning and rules. A framework is presented for (...)
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  44.  79
    Wittgenstein, Dreaming and Anti-Realism: A Reply to Richard Scheer.William Child - 2009 - Philosophical Investigations 32 (4):329-337.
    I have argued that Wittgenstein's treatment of dreaming involves a kind of anti-realism about the past: what makes "I dreamed p " true is, roughly, that I wake with the feeling or impression of having dreamed p . Richard Scheer raises three objections. First, that the texts do not support my interpretation. Second, that the anti-realist view of dreaming does not make sense, so cannot be Wittgenstein's view. Third, that the anti-realist view leaves it a mystery why someone who reports (...)
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  45. Wittgenstein's Externalism.William Child - 2010 - In Daniel Whiting (ed.), The Later Wittgenstein on Language. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  46. Wittgenstein's Externalism and Modern Externalism.W. Child - 2002 - Filosoficky Casopis 50 (3):459-478.
     
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  47. The New Wittgenstein.Alice Crary, Rupert Read, Timothy G. Mccarthy, Sean C. Stidd, David Charles & William Child - 2005 - Mind 114 (453):129-137.
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  48.  23
    Explaining Attitudes: A Practical Approach to the Mind.William Child - 1996 - Mind and Language 11 (3):306-312.
  49.  47
    Solipsism and First Person/Third Person Asymmetries.William Child - 1996 - European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):137-154.
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