Results for 'W. Sonneveld'

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  1.  33
    Teaching and Learning the Nature of Technical Artifacts.I. Frederik, W. Sonneveld & M. J. De Vries - unknown
    Artifacts are probably our most obvious everyday encounter with technology. Therefore, a good understanding of the nature of technical artifacts is a relevant part of technological literacy. In this article we draw from the philosophy of technology to develop a conceptualization of technical artifacts that can be used for educational purposes. Furthermore we report a small exploratory empirical study to see to what extent teachers’ intuitive ideas about artifacts match with the way philosophers write about the nature of artifacts. Finally, (...)
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  2.  78
    Theodor W. Adorno on ‘Marx and the Basic Concepts of Sociological Theory’.Theodor W. Adorno, Verena Erlenbusch-Anderson & Chris O’Kane - 2018 - Historical Materialism 26 (1):154-164.
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  3.  24
    Therapeutic Approaches to Fibromyalgia in the Netherlands: A Comparison Between 1998 and 2005.Mariëlle E. A. L. Kroese, Guy J. C. Schulpen, Henk M. Sonneveld & Hubertus J. M. Vrijhoef - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (2):321-325.
  4.  50
    Exploitation*: ALLEN W. WOOD.Allen W. Wood - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):136-158.
    It is commonly thought that exploitation is unjust; some think it is part of the very meaning of the word ‘exploitation’ that it is unjust. Those who think this will suppose that the just society has to be one in which people do not exploit one another, at least on a large scale. I will argue that exploitation is not unjust by definition, and that a society might be fundamentally just while nevertheless being pervasively exploitative. I do think that exploitation (...)
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  5.  64
    W. M. Ramsay—The Historical Geography of Asia Minor.W. W. & W. M. Ramsay - 1890 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 11:352-353.
  6.  18
    I–Allen W. Wood.Allen W. Wood - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):189-210.
  7.  60
    When is Attribution of Beliefs Justified? [P&W].Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):592-593.
  8. In Conversation. W.V. Quine.W. V. Quine, Rudolf Fara & Philosophy International - 1994 - Philosophy International, Centre for the Philosophy of the Natural and Social Sciences, London School of Economics.
     
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  9.  83
    Robust Re-Engineering: A Philosophical Account?: W. Wimsatt, Re-Engineering Philosophy for Limited Beings: Piecewise Approximations to Reality. Harvard, 2007.W. C. Wimsatt - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (2):295-303.
  10.  24
    Christopher W. Tindale, Fallacies and Argument Appraisal: Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007, Xvii + 218 Pp. Series: Critical Reasoning and Argumentation.Erik C. W. Krabbe - 2009 - Argumentation 23 (1):127-131.
  11. Alan W. Richardson. 'The Tenacious, Malleable, Indefatigable, and yet, Eternally Modifiable Will': Hans Reichenbach's Knowing Subject.Alan W. Richardson & Thomas E. Uebel - 2005 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):73–87.
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  12.  45
    The Meeting of East and West. By W. T. Stace.W. T. Stace - 1946 - Ethics 57 (2):137-141.
  13.  48
    Three Problems with Contractarian-Consequentialist Ways of Assessing Social Institutions*: THOMAS W. POGGE.Thomas W. Pogge - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):241-266.
    With each of our three criminal-law topics—defining offenses, apprehending suspects, and establishing punishments—we feel, I believe, strong moral resistance to the idea that our practices should be settled by a prospective-participant perspective. This becomes quite clear when we look at how the “reforms” suggested by institutional viewing might combine once we consider all three topics together: imagine a more extensive and swifter use of the death penalty in homicide cases coupled with somewhat lower standards of evidence; or think of backing (...)
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  14.  19
    Positive Sexism*: L. W. SUMINER.L. W. Sumner - 1987 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (1):204-222.
    No one who cares about equal opportunity can derive much comfort from the present occupational distribution of working women. In the various industrial societies of the West, women comprise between one quarter and one-half of the national labor force. However, they tend to clustered in employment sectors – especially clerical, sales, and service J occupations – which rank relatively low in remuneration, status, autonomy, and other perquisites. Meanwhile, the more prestigious and rewarding managerial and professional positions, as well as the (...)
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  15.  30
    I—A. W. Moore.A. W. Moore - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):169-193.
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  16.  18
    What is Utility?: D. W. Haslett.D. W. Haslett - 1990 - Economics and Philosophy 6 (1):65-94.
    Social scientists could learn some useful things from philosophy. Here I shall discuss what I take to be one such thing: a better understanding of the concept of utility. There are several reasons why a better understanding may be useful. First, this concept is commonly found in the writings of social scientists, especially economists. Second, utility is the main ingredient in utilitarianism, a perspective on morality that, traditionally, has been very influential among social scientists. Third, and most important, with a (...)
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  17.  23
    Aristotle on Dialectic: D. W. Hamlyn.D. W. Hamlyn - 1990 - Philosophy 65 (254):465-476.
    There have in recent years been at least two important attempts to get to grips with Aristotle's conception of dialectic. I have in mind those by Martha C. Nussbaum in ‘Saving Aristotle's appearances’, which is chapter 8 of her The Fragility of Goodness , and by Terence H. Irwin in his important, though in my opinion somewhat misguided, book Aristotle's First Principles . There is a sense in which both of these writers are reacting to the work of G. E. (...)
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  18.  35
    Comment on W. S. Croddy's Paper.W. V. Quine - 1976 - Erkenntnis 10 (1):103 -.
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  19. Cost-Effectiveness and Disability Discrimination: Dan W. Brock.Dan W. Brock - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):27-47.
    It is widely recognized that prioritizing health care resources by their relative cost-effectiveness can result in lower priority for the treatment of disabled persons than otherwise similar non-disabled persons. I distinguish six different ways in which this discrimination against the disabled can occur. I then spell out and evaluate the following moral objections to this discrimination, most of which capture an aspect of its unethical character: it implies that disabled persons' lives are of lesser value than those of non-disabled persons; (...)
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  20.  83
    Two Theories of the Good: L. W. SUMNER.L. W. Sumner - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (2):1-14.
    Suppose that the ultimate point of ethics is to make the world a better place. If it is, we must face the question: better in what respect? If the good is prior to the right — that is, if the rationale for all requirements of the right is that they serve to further the good in one way or another — then what is this good? Is there a single fundamental value capable of underlying and unifying all of our moral (...)
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  21.  63
    The Difference Between Fichte's and Schelling's System of Philosophy: An English Translation of G. W. F. Hegel's Differenz des Fichte'schen Und Schelling'schen Systems der Philosophie. [REVIEW]G. W. F. Hegel - 1977 - State University of New York Press.
    In this essay, Hegel attempted to show how Fichte’s Science of Knowledge was an advance from the position of Kant in the Critique of Pure Reason, and how Schelling (and incidentally Hegel himself) had made a further advance from the position of Fichte.
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  22.  16
    W.D. Ross - Das Richtige und das Gute.W. D. Ross, Philipp Schwind & Bernd Goebel - 2020 - Felix Meiner Verlag.
    Das »Richtige und das Gute« (1930), das ethische Hauptwerk W. D. Ross’, enthält eine Vielzahl wichtiger moralphilosophischer Thesen und Argumente, die bis in die Gegenwart kontrovers diskutiert werden. Im Mittelpunkt steht seine pluralistische Deontologie, der zufolge sich die richtige Handlung aus einer Abwägung der in der jeweiligen Situation relevanten und unableitbaren Prima-facie-Pflichten ergibt, von denen nur ein Teil auf die Optimierung der Handlungsfolgen bezogen ist. Diese Deontologie wurde zu einem modernen Klassiker unter den normativen ethischen Theorien. Darüber hinaus stellt Ross’ (...)
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  23.  49
    Aristotle on the Best Life for a Man: W. F. R. Hardie.W. F. R. Hardie - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (207):35-50.
    Does Aristotle in the Nicomachean Ethics give one consistent answer to the question what life is best or two mutually inconsistent answers? In the First Book he says that we can agree to say that the best life is eudaimonia or eupraxia but must go on to say in what eudaimonia consists . By considering the specific nature of man as a thinking animal he reaches a conclusion: eudaimonia , the human good , is the activity of soul in accordance (...)
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  24. Rule-Consequentialism and Irrelevant Others: Douglas W. Portmore.Douglas W. Portmore - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (3):368-376.
    In this article, I argue that Brad Hooker's rule-consequentialism implausibly implies that what earthlings are morally required to sacrifice for the sake of helping their less fortunate brethren depends on whether or not other people exist on some distant planet even when these others would be too far away for earthlings to affect.
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  25.  16
    Virtue and Nature: Christopher W. Gowans.Christopher W. Gowans - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):28-55.
    The Neo-Aristotelian ethical naturalism of Philippa Foot and Rosalind Hursthouse purports to establish a naturalistic criterion for the virtues. Specifically, by developing a parallel between the natural ends of nonhuman animals and the natural ends of human beings, they argue that character traits are justified as virtues by the extent to which they promote and do not inhibit natural ends such as self-preservation, reproduction, and the well-being of one’s social group. I argue that the approach of Foot and Hursthouse cannot (...)
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  26.  14
    Aristotle. Fragmenta Selecta. Ed. W. D. Ross [Script. Class. Bibl. Oxon]. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1955. Pp. X + 160. 18s. [REVIEW]A. L. Peck & W. D. Ross - 1958 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 78:163-164.
  27.  14
    Regarding Immortality: ROY W. PERRETT.Roy W. Perrett - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (2):219-233.
    Would personal immortality have any value for one so endowed? An affirmative answer would seem so obvious to some that they might be tempted to go so far as to claim that immortality is a condition of life's having any value at all. The claim that immortality is a necessary condition for the meaningfulness of life seems untenable. What, however, of the claim that immortality is a sufficient condition for the meaningfulness of life? Though some might hold this to be (...)
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  28.  9
    An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation. By J. W. Robson.J. W. Robson - 1947 - Ethics 58 (2):140-143.
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  29.  20
    Negligence*: KENNETH W. SIMONS.Kenneth W. Simons - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):52-93.
    Faced with the choice between creating a risk of harm and taking a precaution against that risk, should I take the precaution? Does the proper analysis of this trade-off require a maximizing, utilitarian approach? If not, how does one properly analyze the trade-off? These questions are important, for we often are uncertain about the effects of our actions. Accordingly, we often must consider whether our actions create an unreasonable risk of injury — that is, whether our actions are negligent.
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  30.  39
    Love's Constancy: Mike W. Martin.Mike W. Martin - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (263):63-77.
    ‘Marital faithfulness’ refers to faithful love for a spouse or lover to whom one is committed, rather than the narrower idea of sexual fidelity. The distinction is clearly marked in traditional wedding vows. A commitment to love faithfully is central: ‘to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part… and thereto I plight [pledge] thee my troth [faithfulness]’. (...)
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  31. Locating Wittgenstein: John W. Cook.John W. Cook - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (2):273-289.
    Wittgenstein wrote ‘While thinking philosophically we see problems in places where there are none. It is for philosophy to show that there are no problems’. He meant that the ‘problems’ philosophers grapple with are of their own making. In a related remark he said: ‘This is the essence of a philosophical problem. The question itself is the result of a muddle. And when the question is removed, this is not by answering it’. Even more explicitly he said: ‘All that philosophy (...)
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  32.  77
    Is Virtue Its Own Reward?: L. W. SUMNER.L. W. Sumner - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (1):18-36.
    If I lead a life of virtue, that may well be good for you. But will it also be good for me? The idea that it will—or even must—is an ancient one, and its appeal runs deep. For if this idea is correct then we can provide everyone with a good reason—arguably the best reason—for being virtuous. However, for all the effort which has been invested in defending the idea, by some of the best minds in the history of philosophy, (...)
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  33.  20
    Karl Popper and Economic Methodology: A New Look: Douglas W. Hands.Douglas W. Hands - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):83-99.
    Discussions of Karl Popper's falsificationist philosophy of science appear regularly in the recent literature on economic methodology. In this literature, there seem to be two fundamental points of agreement about Popper. First, most economists take Popper's falsificationist method of bold conjecture and severe test to be the correct characterization of scientific conduct in the physical sciences. Second, most economists admit that economic theory fails miserably when judged by these same falsificationist standards. As Latsis states, “the development of economic analysis would (...)
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  34.  18
    Rebirth: ROY W. PERRETT.Roy W. Perrett - 1987 - Religious Studies 23 (1):41-57.
    Traditional Western conceptions of immortality characteristically presume that we come into existence at a particular time , live out our earthly span and then die. According to some, our death may then be followed by a deathless post-mortem existence. In other words, it is assumed that we are born only once and die only once; and that – at least on some accounts – we are future-sempiternal creatures. The Western secular tradition affirms at least ; the Western religious tradition – (...)
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  35.  16
    Plato: Protagoras and Meno. A New Translation by W. K. C. Guthrie. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1956. Pp. 157. 2s. 6d.D. Tarrant & W. K. C. Guthrie - 1958 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 78:163-163.
  36.  25
    Review Symposium : Douglas W. Hands G. C. Archibald Joseph Agassi on S. J. Latsis, Ed. Method and Appraisal in Economics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1976. Pp. VIII + 218. $17.50 the Methodology of Economic Research Programmes. [REVIEW]Douglas W. Hands - 1979 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (3):293-303.
  37.  74
    Questions About the Meaning of Life: R. W. HEPBURN.R. W. Hepburn - 1966 - Religious Studies 1 (2):125-140.
    Claims about ‘the meaning of life’ have tended to be made and discussed in conjunction with bold metaphysical and theological affirmations. For life to have meaning, there must be a comprehensive divine plan to give it meaning, or there must be an intelligible cosmic process with a ‘telos’ that a man needs to know if his life is to be meaningfully orientated. Or, it is thought to be a condition of the meaningfulness of life, that values should be ultimately ‘conserved’ (...)
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  38.  67
    The Relation Between Self-Interest and Justice in Contractarian Ethics*: CHRISTOPHER W. MORRIS.Christopher W. Morris - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (2):119-153.
    One of the most noteworthy features of David Gauthier's rational choice, contractarian theory of morality is its appeal to self-interested rationality. This appeal, however, will undoubtedly be the source of much controversy and criticism. For while self-interestedness is characteristic of much human behavior, it is not characteristic of all such behavior, much less of that which is most admirable. Yet contractarian ethics appears to assume that humans are entirely self-interested. It is not usually thought a virtue of a theory that (...)
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  39.  30
    Ought, Reasons, and Morality: The Collected Papers of W.D. Falk.W. D. Falk - 1986 - Cornell University Press.
  40.  41
    On the Non-Lorentz-Invariance of M.W. Evans' O(3)-Symmetry Law.Gerhard W. Bruhn - 2008 - Foundations of Physics 38 (1):3-6.
    In 1992 M.W. Evans proposed the O(3) symmetry of electromagnetic fields by adding a constant longitudinal magnetic field to the well-known transverse electric and magnetic fields of circularly polarized plane waves, such that certain cyclic relations of a so-called O(3) symmetry are fulfilled. Since then M.W. Evans has elevated this O(3) symmetry to the status of a new law of electromagnetics. As a law of physics must be invariant under admissible coordinate transforms, namely Lorentz transforms, in 2000 he published a (...)
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  41. Essays on the Philosophy of W. V. Quine.Robert W. Shahan, Chris Swoyer & W. V. Quine - 1979 - University of Oklahoma Press, C1979.
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  42. Human Flourishing and Universal Justice*: THOMAS W. POGGE.Thomas W. Pogge - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (1):333-361.
    The question of what constitutes human flourishing elicits an extraordinary variety of responses, which suggests that there are not merely differences of opinion at work, but also different understandings of the question itself. So it may help to introduce some clarity into the question before starting work on one answer to it.
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  43. Economic Equality: Rawls Versus Utilitarianism: Stephen W. Ball.Stephen W. Ball - 1986 - Economics and Philosophy 2 (2):225-244.
    Perhaps the most salient feature of Rawls's theory of justice which at once attracts supporters and repels critics is its apparent egalitarian conclusion as to how economic goods are to be distributed. Indeed, many of Rawls's sympathizers may find this result intuitively appealing, and regard it as Rawls's enduring contribution to the topic of economic justice, despite technical deficiencies in Rawls's contractarian, decision-theoretic argument for it which occupy the bulk of the critical literature. Rawls himself, having proposed a “coherence” theory (...)
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  44.  68
    Words and Objections Essays on the Work of W.V. Quine.Donald Davidson, Jaakko Hintikka & W. V. Quine - 1969 - Reidel.
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  45.  33
    The Origin of Negative Dialectics.The Frankfurt School. The Critical Theories of Max Horkeimer and Theodor W. Adorno.Gillian Rose, Theodor W. Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Frankfurt Institute, Susan Buck-Morss, Zoltan Tar & Michael Landman - 1979 - History and Theory 18 (1):126.
  46. W.J.M.M., Political Questions Essays in Honour of W. J. M. Mackenzie.W. J. M. Mackenzie, Brian Chapman & Allen Meyers Potter - 1974
     
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  47.  16
    G. W. S. Barrow, Robert Bruce And The Community Of The Realm Of Scotland. Berkeley And Los Angeles: University Of California Press, 1965. Pp. Xxiv, 502; Frontispiece Plate; 13 Maps; 2 Genealogical Tables. $7.50.Book Query [Google Scholar]E. L. G. Stones, Ed., And Trans., Anglo-Scottish Relations, 1174–1328: Some Selected Documents. London: Thomas Nelson; New York: Oxford University Press, 1965. Pp. Lvi, 198 ; 1 Plate. 84s. Net ; $13.45. [REVIEW]W. Reid - 1966 - Speculum 41 (3):517-520.
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  48. "Jones," W. H. S., Pausanias, Translated, II.W. Rhys Roberts - 1927 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 21:11-15.
  49. Ralph W. Tyler in Review: An Interview and Antecedent Reflections.W. H. Schubert & A. L. Schubert - 1986 - Journal of Thought 21 (1):7-14.
     
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  50.  40
    Duda W. L.. Post Canonical Language. Summaries of Talks Presented at the Summer Institute for Symbolic Logic, Cornell University, 1957, 2nd Edn., Communications Research Division, Institute for Defense Analyses, Princeton, N.J., 1960, Pp. 410–423. [REVIEW]W. E. Singletary - 1971 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (2):343-343.
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