33 found
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  1. How Brains Make Chaos in Order to Make Sense of the World.Christine A. Skarda & Walter J. Freeman - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):161-173.
  2.  7
    A Physiological Hypothesis of Perception.Walter J. Freeman - 1981 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 24 (4):561-592.
  3. Consciousness, Intentionality, and Causality.Walter J. Freeman - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):11-12.
    According to behavioural theories deriving from pragmatism, gestalt psychology, existentialism, and ecopsychology, knowledge about the world is gained by intentional action followed by learning. In terms of the neurodynamics described here, if the intending of an act comes to awareness through reafference, it is perceived as a cause. If the consequences of an act come to awareness through proprioception and exteroception, they are perceived as an effect. A sequence of such states of awareness comprises consciousness, which can grow in complexity (...)
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  4.  29
    Chaotic Dynamics Versus Representationalism.Walter J. Freeman & Christine A. Skarda - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):167-168.
  5. Representations: Who Needs Them?Walter J. Freeman & Christine A. Skarda - 1990 - In J. McGaugh, Jerry Weinberger & G. Lynch (eds.), Brain Organization and Memory. Guilford Press.
     
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  6. Nonlinear Neurodynamics of Intentionality.Walter J. Freeman - 1997 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 18 (2-3):291-304.
    Study of electroencephalographic brain activity in behaving animals has guided development of a model for the self-organization of goal-directed behavior. Synthesis of a dynamical representation of brain function is based in the concept of intentionality as the organizing principle of animal and human behavior. The constructions of patterns of brain activity constitute meaning and not information or representations. The three accepted meanings of intention: "aboutness," goal-seeking, and wound healing, can be incorporated into the dynamics of meaningful behavior, centered in the (...)
     
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  7.  26
    Restoring to Cognition the Forgotten Primacy of Action, Intention and Emotion.Walter J. Freeman & Rafael Núñez - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):11-12.
    Introduction to Special Issue on ‘Reclaiming Cognition: The Primacy of Action, Intention and Emotion’. Making sense of the mind is the human odyssey. Today, the cognitive sciences provide the vehicles and equipage. As do all culturally shaped activities, they manifest crystallized generalizations and ideological legacies, many of which go unquestioned for centuries. From time to time, these ideologies are successfully challenged, generating revisions and new forms of understanding. We believe that the cognitive sciences have reached a situation in which they (...)
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  8. Reclaiming Cognition: The Primacy of Action, Intention and Emotion.Rafael Nunez & Walter J. Freeman (eds.) - 2000 - Imprint Academic.
    Traditional cognitive science is Cartesian in the sense that it takes as fundamental the distinction between the mental and the physical, the mind and the world. This leads to the claim that cognition is representational and best explained using models derived from AI and computational theory. The authors depart radically from this model.
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  9.  25
    The Behavior-Cognition Link is Well Done; the Cognition-Brain Link Needs More Work.Walter J. Freeman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):42-43.
    Thelen et al. have a strong case for linking behavior with mind through nonrepresentational dynamics. Their case linking mind with brain is less compelling. Modified avenues are proposed for further exploration: greater emphasis on the dynamics of perception; use of chaotic instead of deterministic dynamics with noise; and use of intentionality instead of motivation, taking advantage of its creative dynamics to model genesis of goal-directed behaviors.
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  10.  19
    Dynamic Systems and the “Subsymbolic Level”.Walter J. Freeman - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):33-34.
  11. Three Centuries of Category Errors in Studies of the Neural Basis of Consciousness and Intentionality.Walter J. Freeman - 1997 - Neural Networks 10:1175-83.
  12.  64
    The Hebbian Paradigm Reintegrated: Local Reverberations as Internal Representations.Walter J. Freeman - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):631-631.
    Recurrent excitation is experimentally well documented in cortical populations. It provides for intracortical excitatory biases that linearize negative feedback interactions and induce macroscopic state transitions during perception. The concept of the local neighborhood should be expanded to spatial patterns as the basis for perception, in which large areas of cortex are bound into cooperative behavior with near-silent columns as important as active columns revealed by unit recording.
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  13.  66
    Societies of Brains: Walter Freeman in Conversation with Jean Burns.Walter J. Freeman & J. Burns - 1996 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (2):172-180.
    [opening paragraph]: Walter Freeman discusses with Jean Burns some of the issues relating to consciousness in his recent book. Burns: To understand consciousness we need know its relationship to the brain, and to do that we need to know how the brain processes information. A lot of people think of brain processing in terms of individual neurons, and you're saying that brain processing should be understood in terms of dynamical states of populations?
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  14.  34
    Happiness Doesnt Come in Bottles. Neuroscientists Learn That Joy Comes Through Dancing, Not Drugs.Walter J. Freeman - 1997 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (1):67-70.
    Too little has been written about the biology of joy. Most of the articles in the medical literature about brains and emotions are devoted to explaining how we feel fear, anger, anxiety and despair. This is understandable, because we don't go to doctors when we are feeling optimistic, happy and joyful. Most of what we know about the chemistry of our emotions has been learned from the disorders and the treatments of people who are sad and depressed. -/- But we (...)
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  15.  9
    Brain Neural Activity Patterns Yielding Numbers Are Operators, Not Representations.Walter J. Freeman & Robert Kozma - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):336.
  16.  46
    Local-Global Interactions and the Role of Mesoscopic (Intermediate-Range) Elements in Brain Dynamics.Walter J. Freeman & Robert Kozma - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):401-401.
    A unifing theory of spatiotemporal brain dynamics should incorporate multiple spatial and temporal scales. Between the microscopic (local) and macroscopic (global) components proposed by Nunez, mesoscopic (intermediate-range) elements should be integral parts of models. The corresponding mathematical formalism requires tools of nonlinear dynamics and the use of aperiodic (chaotic) attractors. Some relations between local-mesoscopic and mesoscopic-global components are outlined.
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  17.  24
    Deconstruction of Neural Data Yields Biologically Implausible Periodic Oscillations.Walter J. Freeman - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):458-459.
  18.  19
    Physiology: Is There Any Other Game in Town?Christine A. Skarda & Walter J. Freeman - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):183-195.
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  19.  20
    Consciousness as Physiological Self-Organizing Process.Walter J. Freeman - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):604-605.
  20.  63
    Neurogenetic Determinism is a Theological Doctrine.Walter J. Freeman - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):893-894.
    In “Lifelines” Steven Rose constructs a case against neurogenetic determinism based on experimental data from biology and in favor of a significant degree of self determination. Two philosophical errors in the case favoring neurogenetic determinism are illustrated by Rose: category mistakes and an excessively narrow view of causality restricted to the linear form.
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  21.  58
    Noise-Driven Attractor Landscapes for Perception by Mesoscopic Brain Dynamics.Walter J. Freeman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):816-817.
    Tsuda offers advanced concepts to model brain functions, includ-ing “chaotic itinerancy,” “attractor ruins,” “singular-continuous nowhere-differentiable attractors,” “Cantor coding,” “multi-Milnor attractor systems,” and “dynamically generated noise.” References to physiological descriptions of attractor landscapes governing activity over cortical fields maintained by millions of action potentials may facilitate their application in future experimental designs and data analyses.
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  22.  50
    Roles of Allocortex and Centrencephalon in Intentionality and Consciousness.Walter J. Freeman - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):92-93.
    “Decortication” does not distinguish between removing all cerebral cortex, including three-layered allocortex or just six-layered neocortex. Functional decortication, by spreading depression, reversibly suppresses only neocortex, leaving minimal intentionality. Removal of all forebrain structures except a hypothalamic “island” blocks all intentional behaviors, leaving only tropisms. To what extent do Merker's examples retain allocortex, and how might such residues affect his interpretations? (Published Online May 1 2007).
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  23. Mind/Brain Science.Walter J. Freeman & Christine A. Skarda - 1991 - In Ernest LePore & Robert Van Gulick (eds.), John Searle and His Critics. Cambridge: Blackwell. pp. 115--27.
  24.  37
    Emotion is From Preparatory Brain Chaos; Irrational Action is From Premature Closure.Walter J. Freeman - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):204-205.
    EEG evidence supports the view that each cerebral hemisphere maintains a scale-free network that generates and maintains a global state of chaos. By its own evolution, and under environmental impacts, this hemispheric chaos can rise to heights that may either escape containment and engender incontinent action or be constrained by predictive control and yield creative action of great power and beauty.
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  25.  33
    Self, Awareness of Self, and the Illusion of Control.Walter J. Freeman - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):112-113.
    A distinction between the self and its superstructure, the ego, supports Mele's conclusions. The dynamics of the limbic system generates the self through behavior that is subject to societal observation. The rest of the brain contributes awareness that, by ingenious back-dating and rationalization, gives the ultimate in self-deception: the illusion of control of the self by its own derivative.
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  26.  34
    The Frontal Lobes and Consciousness of Self.Walter J. Freeman & J. W. Watts - 1941 - Psychosomatic Medicine 3:111-19.
  27.  14
    The Neurobiology of Semantics: How Can Machines Be Designed to Have Meanings?Walter J. Freeman - 2001 - In T. Kitamura (ed.), What Should Be Computed to Understand and Model Brain Function? World Scientific. pp. 3--207.
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  28.  11
    Experimental Demonstration of “Shunting Networks,” the “Sigmoid Function,” and “Adaptive Resonance” in the Olfactory System.Walter J. Freeman - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (4):665.
  29.  10
    Circle and Circulation: The Language and Imagery of William Harvey's Discovery.Peter M. Jucovy & Walter J. Freeman - 1976 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 20 (1):92-107.
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  30.  11
    Neural System Stability.Walter J. Freeman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):298-299.
    Two hypotheses concerning nonlinear elements in complex systems are contrasted: that neurons, intrinsically unstable, are stabilized through embedding in networks and populations; and, conversely, that cortical neurons are intrinsically stable, but are destabilized through embedding in cortical populations and corticostriatal feedback systems. Tests are made by piecewise linearization of nonlinear dynamics at nonequilibriumoperating points, followed by linear stability analysis.
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  31.  3
    Too Soon for Time and Consciousness.Walter J. Freeman - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):559.
  32. Peer Commentary on Are There Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Commentary on Essay by Alva Noe and Evan Thompson.Walter J. Freeman - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):38-39.
  33. Three Types of State Transition Underlying Perception.Walter J. Freeman - 2008 - In Hans Liljenström & Peter Århem (eds.), Consciousness Transitions: Phylogenetic, Ontogenetic, and Physiological Aspects. Elsevier.