26 found
Order:
  1. Disentangling Metaphor From Context: An ERP Study.Valentina Bambini, Chiara Bertini, Walter Schaeken, Alessandra Stella & Francesco Di Russo - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2.  11
    Mental Models and Temporal Reasoning.Walter Schaeken, P. N. Johnson-Laird & Gery D'Ydewalle - 1996 - Cognition 60 (3):205-234.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  3.  18
    A Dual-Process Specification of Causal Conditional Reasoning.Niki Verschueren, Walter Schaeken & Géry D'Ydewalle - 2005 - Thinking and Reasoning 11 (3):239-278.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  4.  18
    Working Memory and Everyday Conditional Reasoning: Retrieval and Inhibition of Stored Counterexamples.Wim De Neys, Walter Schaeken & Géry D'Ydewalle - 2005 - Thinking and Reasoning 11 (4):349-381.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  5.  5
    Processing Conversational Implicatures: Alternatives and Counterfactual Reasoning.Bob van Tiel & Walter Schaeken - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41:1119-1154.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  20
    Strategies During Complex Conditional Inferences.Kristien Dieussaert, Walter Schaeken, Walter Schroyens & Gery D'Ydewalle - 2000 - Thinking and Reasoning 6 (2):125 – 160.
    In certain contexts reasoners reject instances of the valid Modus Ponens and Modus Tollens inference form in conditional arguments. Byrne (1989) observed this suppression effect when a conditional premise is accompanied by a conditional containing an additional requirement. In an earlier study, Rumain, Connell, and Braine (1983) observed suppression of the invalid inferences "the denial of the antecedent" and "the affirmation of the consequent" when a conditional premise is accompanied by a conditional containing an alternative requirement. Here we present three (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  7.  18
    Is the Truth Table Task Mistaken?Aline Sevenants, Kristien Dieussaert & Walter Schaeken - 2012 - Thinking and Reasoning 18 (2):119 - 132.
    There is ample evidence that in classical truth table task experiments false antecedents are judged as ?irrelevant?. Instead of interpreting this in support of a suppositional representation of conditionals, Schroyens (2010a, 2010b) attributes it to the induction problem: the impossibility of establishing the truth of a universal claim on the basis of a single case. In the first experiment a truth table task with four options is administered and the correlation with intelligence is inspected. It is observed that ?undetermined? is (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  18
    Pronounced Inferences: A Study on Inferential Conditionals.Sara Verbrugge, Kristien Dieussaert, Walter Schaeken, Hans Smessaert & William Van Belle - 2007 - Thinking and Reasoning 13 (2):105 – 133.
    An experimental study is reported which investigates the differences in interpretation between content conditionals (of various pragmatic types) and inferential conditionals. In a content conditional, the antecedent represents a requirement for the consequent to become true. In an inferential conditional, the antecedent functions as a premise and the consequent as the inferred conclusion from that premise. The linguistic difference between content and inferential conditionals is often neglected in reasoning experiments. This turns out to be unjustified, since we adduced evidence on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  9.  29
    Truth Table Tasks: Irrelevance and Cognitive Ability.Aline Sevenants, Kristien Dieussaert & Walter Schaeken - 2011 - Thinking and Reasoning 17 (3):213 - 246.
    Two types of truth table task are used to examine people's mental representation of conditionals. In two within-participants experiments, participants either receive the same task-type twice (Experiment 1) or are presented successively with both a possibilities task and a truth task (Experiment 2). Experiment 3 examines how people interpret the three-option possibilities task and whether they have a clear understanding of it. The present study aims to examine, for both task-types, how participants' cognitive ability relates to the classification of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  24
    Strategies in Temporal Reasoning.Walter Schaeken & Philip N. Johnson-Laird - 2000 - Thinking and Reasoning 6 (3):193 – 219.
    This paper reports three studies of temporal reasoning. A problem of the following sort, where the letters denote common everyday events: A happens before B. C happens before B. D happens while B. E happens while C. What is the relation between D and EEfficacylls for at least two alternative models to be constructed in order to give the right answer for the right reason. However, the first premise is irrelevant to this answer, and so if reasoners were to ignore (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  11.  20
    A Dual-Process Specification of Causal Conditional Reasoning.Niki Verschueren, Walter Schaeken & G. - 2005 - Thinking and Reasoning 11 (3):239 – 278.
    There are two accounts describing causal conditional reasoning: the probabilistic and the mental models account. According to the probabilistic account, the tendency to accept a conclusion is related to the probability by which cause and effect covary. According to the mental models account, the tendency to accept a conclusion relates to the availability of counterexamples. These two accounts are brought together in a dual-process theory: It is argued that the probabilistic reasoning process can be considered as a heuristic process whereas (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  9
    The Processing of Negations in Conditional Reasoning: A Meta-Analytic Case Study in Mental Model and/or Mental Logic Theory.Walter J. Schroyens, Walter Schaeken & Géry D'Ydewalle - 2001 - Thinking and Reasoning 7 (2):121-172.
  13. Propositional Reasoning by Model.Philip N. Johnson-Laird, Ruth M. Byrne & Walter Schaeken - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (3):418-439.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  14.  28
    Working Memory and Counterexample Retrieval for Causal Conditionals.Wim De Neys, Walter Schaeken & Géry D'Ydewalle - 2005 - Thinking and Reasoning 11 (2):123-150.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  30
    Conditional Reasoning with Negations: Implicit and Explicit Affirmation or Denial and the Role of Contrast Classes.Walter Schroyens, Niki Verschueren, Walter Schaeken & Gery D'Ydewalle - 2000 - Thinking and Reasoning 6 (3):221 – 251.
    We report two studies on the effect of implicitly versus explicitly conveying affirmation and denial problems about conditionals. Recently Evans and Handley (1999) and Schroyens et al. (1999b, 2000b) showed that implicit referencing elicits matching bias: Fewer determinate inferences are made, when the categorical premise (e.g., B) mismatches the conditional's referred clause (e.g., A). Also, the effect of implicit affirmation (B affirms not-A) is larger than the effect of implicit denial (B denies A). Schroyens et al. hypothesised that this interaction (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  9
    Working Memory and Everyday Conditional Reasoning: Retrieval and Inhibition of Stored Counterexamples.Wim de Neys, Walter Schaeken & G. - 2005 - Thinking and Reasoning 11 (4):349 – 381.
    Two experiments examined the contribution of working memory (WM) to the retrieval and inhibition of background knowledge about counterexamples (alternatives and disablers, Cummins, 1995) during conditional reasoning. Experiment 1 presented a conditional reasoning task with everyday, causal conditionals to a group of people with high and low WM spans. High spans rejected the logically invalid AC and DA inferences to a greater extent than low spans, whereas low spans accepted the logically valid MP and MT inferences less frequently than high (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  16
    The Processing of Negations in Conditional Reasoning: A Meta-Analytic Case Study in Mental Model and/or Mental Logic Theory.Walter J. Schroyens, Walter Schaeken & G. - 2001 - Thinking and Reasoning 7 (2):121 – 172.
    We present a meta-analytic review on the processing of negations in conditional reasoning about affirmation problems (Modus Ponens: "MP", Affirmation of the Consequent "AC") and denial problems (Denial of the Antecedent "DA", and Modus Tollens "MT"). Findings correct previous generalisations about the phenomena. First, the effects of negation in the part of the conditional about which an inference is made, are not constrained to denial problems. These inferential-negation effects are also observed on AC. Second, there generally are reliable effects of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  1
    The Wording of Conclusions in Relational Reasoning.Jean-Baptiste Van der Henst & Walter Schaeken - 2005 - Cognition 97 (1):1-22.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  6
    Processing Conversational Implicatures: Alternatives and Counterfactual Reasoning.Bob Tiel & Walter Schaeken - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (7).
    In a series of experiments, Bott and Noveck found that the computation of scalar inferences, a variety of conversational implicature, caused a delay in response times. In order to determine what aspect of the inferential process that underlies scalar inferences caused this delay, we extended their paradigm to three other kinds of inferences: free choice inferences, conditional perfection, and exhaustivity in “it”-clefts. In contrast to scalar inferences, the computation of these three kinds of inferences facilitated response times. Following a suggestion (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  12
    Why Do Participants Draw Non-Valid Inferences in Conditional Reasoning?Niki Verschueren, Walter Schroyens, Walter Schaeken & Géry D’Ydewalle - 2001 - Cognition 16:238-246.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Why Models Rather Than Rules Give a Better Account of Propositional Reasoning: A Reply to Bonatti and to O'Brien, Braine, and Yang.P. N. Johnson-Laird, Ruth M. J. Byrne & Walter Schaeken - 1994 - Psychological Review 101 (4):734-739.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  21
    Truth Table Tasks: The Relevance of Irrelevant.Géry D'Ydewalle, Walter Schaeken, Kristien Dieussaert, Walter Schroyens & Aline Sevenants - 2008 - Thinking and Reasoning 14 (4):409-433.
    Two types of truth table tasks are used investigating mental representations of conditionals: a possibilities-based and a truth-based one. In possibilities tasks, participants indicate whether a situation is possible or impossible according to the conditional rule. In truth tasks participants evaluate whether a situation makes the rule true or false, or is irrelevant with respect to the truth of the rule. Comparing the two-option version of the possibilities task with the truth task in Experiment 1, the possibilities task yields logical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  26
    The Relevance of Selecting What's Relevant: A Dual Process Approach to Transitive Reasoning with Spatial Relations.Eef Ameel, Niki Verschueren & Walter Schaeken - 2007 - Thinking and Reasoning 13 (2):164 – 187.
    The present paper focuses on the heuristic selection process preceding the actual transitive reasoning process. A part of the difficulty of transitive reasoning lies in the selection of the relevant problem aspects. Two experiments are presented using the paradigm introduced by Markovits, Dumas, and Malfait (1995), in which children were asked to make “higher than” inferences about arrays of coloured blocks. In order to discriminate between genuine transitive inference and a simple strategy of relative position, Markovits et al. interspersed white (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  24
    Truth Table Tasks: The Relevance of Irrelevant.Aline Sevenants, Walter Schroyens, Kristien Dieussaert, Walter Schaeken & G. - 2008 - Thinking and Reasoning 14 (4):409-433.
    Two types of truth table tasks are used investigating mental representations of conditionals: a possibilities-based and a truth-based one. In possibilities tasks, participants indicate whether a situation is possible or impossible according to the conditional rule. In truth tasks participants evaluate whether a situation makes the rule true or false, or is irrelevant with respect to the truth of the rule. Comparing the two-option version of the possibilities task with the truth task in Experiment 1, the possibilities task yields logical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  14
    Working Memory and Counterexample Retrieval for Causal Conditionals.Wim de Neys, Walter Schaeken & G. - 2005 - Thinking and Reasoning 11 (2):123 – 150.
    The present study is part of recent attempts to specify the characteristics of the counterexample retrieval process during causal conditional reasoning. The study tried to pinpoint whether the retrieval of stored counterexamples (alternative causes and disabling conditions) for a causal conditional is completely automatic in nature or whether the search process also demands executive working memory (WM) resources. In Experiment 1, participants were presented with a counterexample generation task and a measure of WM capacity. We found a positive relation between (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  4
    Processing Time Evidence for a Default-Interventionist Model of Probability Judgments.Ellen Gillard, Wim Van Dooren, Walter Schaeken & Lieven Verschaffel - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography