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  1. Shlomo Pines on Maimonides, Spinoza, and Kant.Warren Zev Harvey - 2012 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (2):173-182.
    In his “Spinoza’s TTP , Maimonides, and Kant” (1968), Pines compared Spinoza’s dogmas of universal faith ( TTP , 14) with Kant’s postulates of practical reason ( Critique of Practical Reason , part 1). According to him, Spinoza’s dogmas, like Maimonides’ “necessary beliefs” ( Guide 3:28), are postulates necessary for political welfare, and do not fall under the jurisdiction of theoretical reason. They define the faith of the common person, not that of the philosopher. Kant, in his remarks about Spinoza (...)
     
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    Idel on Spinoza.Warren Zev Harvey - 2007 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (18):88-94.
    In the course of his studies on Kabbalah, Moshe Idel has written on the influence of Kabbalists on philosophy. He suggests that Spinoza was influenced by the Kabbalah regarding his expressions “Deus sive Natura“ and “amor Dei intellectualis.” The 13th-century ecstatic Kabbalist Rabbi Abraham Abulafia and many authors after him cited the numerical equivalence of the Hebrew words for God and Nature: elohim = ha-teba` = 86. This striking numerical equivalence may be one of the sources of Spinoza’s expression “Deus (...)
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    Spinoza on Biblical Miracles.Warren Zev Harvey - 2013 - Journal of the History of Ideas 74 (4):659-675.
  4. Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise: A Critical Guide.Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Michael A. Rosenthal, Edwin Curley, Piet Steenbakkers, Warren Zev Harvey & Daniel J. Lasker - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise was published anonymously in 1670 and immediately provoked huge debate. Its main goal was to claim that the freedom of philosophizing can be allowed in a free republic and that it cannot be abolished without also destroying the peace and piety of that republic. Spinoza criticizes the traditional claims of revelation and offers a social contract theory in which he praises democracy as the most natural form of government.This Critical Guide to the Treatise presents new essays by (...)
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