Results for 'Watsuji Tetsur��'

110 found
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  1.  5
    Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan.Tetsur? Watsuji & Watsuji Tetsuro (eds.) - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    Watsuji's Rinrigaku has been regarded as the definitive study of Japanese ethics for half a century.
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  2.  43
    Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan.David B. Gordon, Watsuji Tetsuro, Yamamoto Seisaku & Robert E. Carter - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49 (2):216.
  3.  40
    Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan.Watsuji Tetsuro - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    Watsuji's Rinrigaku (literally, the principles that allow us to live in friendly community) has been regarded as the definitive study of Japanese ethics for half a century.
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  4.  13
    6. Watsuji Tetsurō.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 72-77.
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  5. Taking Watsuji Online: Betweenness and Expression in Online Spaces.Lucy Osler & Joel Krueger - 2021 - Continental Philosophy Review (1):1-23.
    In this paper, we introduce the Japanese philosopher Tetsurō Watsuji’s phenomenology of aidagara (“betweenness”) and use his analysis in the contemporary context of online space. We argue that Watsuji develops a prescient analysis anticipating modern technologically-mediated forms of expression and engagement. More precisely, we show that instead of adopting a traditional phenomenological focus on face-to-face interaction, Watsuji argues that communication technologies — which now include Internet-enabled technologies and spaces — are expressive vehicles enabling new forms of emotional (...)
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  6. Watsuji, Intentionality, and Psychopathology.Joel Krueger - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):757-780.
    Despite increasing interest in the work of Tetsuro Watsuji, his discussion of intentionality remains underexplored. I here develop an interpretation and application of his view. First, I unpack Watsuji’s arguments for the inherently social character of intentionality, consider how they connect with his more general discussion of embodiment and betweenness, and then situate his view alongside phenomenologists like Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Next, I argue that Watsuji’s characterization of the social character of intentionality is relevant to current (...)
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  7. Watsuji's Phenomenology of Embodiment and Social Space.Joel Krueger - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2):127-152.
    The aim of this essay is to situate the thought of Tetsurō Watsuji within contemporary approaches to social cognition. I argue for Watsuji’s current relevance, suggesting that his analysis of embodiment and social space puts him in step with some of the concerns driving ongoing treatments of social cognition in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Yet, as I will show, Watsuji can potentially offer a fruitful contribution to this discussion by lending a phenomenologically informed critical perspective. (...)
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  8. Watsuji’s Idea of the Self and the Problem of Spatial Distance in Environmental Ethics.Laÿna Droz - 2018 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 3:145-168.
    Watsuji proposes a conception of the self as embodied and dynamic in constant cyclic relationship with the historical milieu. I argue that the concept of a relational individual can provide some solutions to the problem in environmental ethics of the spatial distance between an agent and the consequences of her actions. Indeed, by becoming aware of the interdependent relation between the self and the local shared milieu, one develops and recognizes feelings of care and belonging, which promote more environmentally (...)
     
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  9.  5
    Climate and Culture: A Philosophical Study.Tetsurō Watsuji - 1961 - Greenwood Press.
    A pioneering philosophical exploration, this volume seeks to clarify the function of climate as a key factor within the structure of human existence. The author takes as his starting point the argument that the phenomena of climate should be treated as expressions of subjective human existence and not of natural environments. In developing his argument, Watsuji first examines the basic principles of climate and then proceeds to examine three types of climate in detail--monsoon, desert, and meadow--and their relative impacts (...)
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  10.  5
    "America's National Character" by Watsuji Tetsurō: A Translation.Kyle Michael James Shuttleworth, Sayaka Shuttleworth & Watsuji Tetsurō - 2021 - Philosophy East and West 71 (4):1005-1028.
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  11. Watsuji's Phenomenology of Aidagara: An Interpretation and Application to Psychopathology.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - In S. Taguchi & Andrea Altobrando (eds.), Tetsugaku Companion to Phenomenology and Japanese Philosophy. Springer. pp. 165-181.
    I discuss Watsuji’s characterization of aidagara or “betweenness”. First, I develop a phenomenological reading of aidagara. I argue that the notion can help illuminate aspects of our embodied subjectivity and its interrelation with the world and others. Along the way, I also indicate how the notion can be fruitfully supplemented by different sources of empirical research. Second, I put aidagara to work in the context of psychopathology. I show how disruptions of aidagara in schizophrenia not only affirm the foundational (...)
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  12.  8
    Watsuji Tetsurō’s Concept of “Authenticity”.Kyle Michael James Shuttleworth - 2019 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 11 (3):235-250.
    ABSTRACTThe translation of honraisei as “authenticity” has caused scholars to compare Watsuji with Heideggerian and Taylorian accounts of authenticity. In this article, it will be demonstrated that this translation of “authenticity” is misleading insofar as it suggests a sense of subjective individuality as prevalent within Western philosophical thought. However, rather than rejecting a Watsujian account of authenticity, it will be argued that we can salvage this understanding by rethinking honraisei as a distinctly Japanese approach to authenticity and one which (...)
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  13.  41
    Watsuji’s Topology of the Self.David W. Johnson - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (3):216-240.
    ABSTRACTThis essay critically develops Watsuji’s nondual ontology of the self through the lens of ‘topological’ thought. Through close description of the embeddedness of the self in, and its emergence from, an intersubjective space which, in turn, is rooted in a particular place, Watsuji shows that the self is constituted by its relational contact with others, on the one hand, and by its immersion in a wider geo-cultural environment, on the other. Yet Watsuji himself had difficulty in smoothly (...)
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  14. Watsuji’s Ethics From the Perspective of Kata as a Technology of the Self.Jordančo Sekulovski - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:199-208.
    This paper investigates the history of systems of thought different from those of the West. A closer look at Japan’s long philosophical tradition draws attention to the presence of uniquely designed acculturation and training techniques designed as kata or shikata, shedding light on kata as a generic technique of self-perfection and self-transformation. By seeing kata as foundational to the Japanese mind and comparing it to Michel Foucault’s research on technologies of the self, the groundwork is laid for a comparative analysis (...)
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  15.  44
    Watsuji Tetsurō (1889-1960): Cultural Phenomenologist and Ethician.David Dilworth - 1974 - Philosophy East and West 24 (1):3-22.
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  16.  11
    Tetsuro Watsuji’s Milieu and Intergenerational Environmental Ethics.Laÿna Droz - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):37-51.
    The concept of humans as relational individuals living in a milieu can provide some solutions to various obstacles of theorization that are standing in the way of an ethics of sustainability. The idea of a milieu was developed by Tetsuro Watsuji as a web of signification and symbols. It refers to the environment as lived by a subjective relational human being and not as artificially objectified. The milieu can neither be separated from its temporal—or historical—dimension as it is directly (...)
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  17.  20
    The Buddhist Roots of Watsuji Tetsurô's Ethics of Emptiness.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):606-635.
    Watsuji Tetsurô is famous for having constructed a systematic socio-political ethics on the basis of the idea of emptiness. This essay examines his 1938 essay “The Concept of ‘Dharma’ and the Dialectics of Emptiness in Buddhist Philosophy” and the posthumously published The History of Buddhist Ethical Thought, in order to clarify the Buddhist roots of his ethics. It aims to answer two main questions which are fundamentally linked: “Which way does Watsuji's legacy turn: toward totalitarianism or toward a (...)
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  18.  73
    Watsuji Tetsuro, Fudo, and Climate Change.Bruce B. Janz - 2011 - Journal of Global Ethics 7 (2):173 - 184.
    In this paper, I wish to consider Watsuji Tetsuro's (1889?1960) concept of climate (fudo), and consider whether it contributes anything to the relationship between climate change and ethics. I will argue that superficially it seems that fudo tells us little about the ethics of climate change, but if considered more carefully, and through the lens of thinkers such as Deleuze and Heidegger, there is ethical insight in Watsuji's approach. Watsuji's major work in ethics, Rinrigaku, provides concepts such (...)
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  19. Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan.Tetsuro Watsuji - 1996
     
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  20. National Communion: Watsuji Tetsuro's Conception of Ethics, Power, and the Japanese Imperial State.Bernard Bernier - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (1):84-105.
    : Watsuji Tetsurō defined ethics as being generated by a double negation: the individual's negation of the community and the self-negation of the individual who returns to the community. Thus, ethics for him is based on the individual's sacrifice for the collectivity. This position results in the conception of the community as an absolute. I contend that there is a congruence between Watsuji's conception of ethics as self-sacrifice and the way he perceived the Japanese political system. To him, (...)
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  21. Watsuji et la découverte de la philosophie japonaise.Ralf Müller - 2005 - In Conference Proceedings of 2nd International Meeting of Le Réseau Asie. Paris, Frankreich:
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  22. Watsuji’s Reading of Dōgen’s Shōbōgenzō.Ralf Müller - 2009 - In James W. Heisig & Raquel Bouso (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6. Nagoya, Präfektur Aichi, Japan: pp. 174-191.
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  23.  2
    Watsuji on Nature: Japanese Philosophy in the Wake of Heidegger by David W. Johnson.Steve Bein - 2022 - Philosophy East and West 72 (1):1-4.
    There is a certain irony in Japan's foremost secular philosopher grounding his ontology and ethics in a term so infamously unclear as fūdo 風土, given that the Japanese word for philosophy itself denotes "clear thinking." One might make the case that Watsuji's concept of fūdo cannot but be unclear, since he is responding to Heidegger's Being and Time, which is hardly the model of lucid philosophy. That said, it is the philosopher's responsibility to clarify the unclear, and that is (...)
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  24. Watsuji Tetsuro,'Rinrigaku': Ethics in Japan Reviewed By.Steven J. Willett - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17 (3):217-220.
  25.  5
    Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen.Steve Bein (ed.) - 2011 - University of Hawaii Press.
    “Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen makes available in a clear and fluid translation an early classic in modern Japanese philosophy. Steve Bein’s annotations, footnotes, introduction, and commentary bridge the gap separating not only the languages but also the cultures of its original readers and its new Western audience.” —from the Foreword by Thomas P. Kasulis In 1223 the monk Dogen Kigen came to the audacious conclusion that Japanese Buddhism had become hopelessly corrupt. He undertook a dangerous pilgrimage to (...)
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  26.  18
    David W. Johnson. Watsuji on Nature: Japanese Philosophy in the Wake of Heidegger. [REVIEW]Maximilian Gregor Hepach - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (1):187-191.
  27.  5
    A Critical Recuperation of Watsuji’s Rinrigaku.Aleardo Zanghellini & Mai Sato - 2020 - Philosophia 49 (3):1289-1307.
    Watsuji is recognised as one Japan’s foremost philosophers. His work on ethics, Rinrigaku, is cosmopolitan in engaging the Western philosophical tradition, and in presupposing an international audience. Yet Watsuji’s ethical thought is largely of niche interest outside Japan, and it is critiqued on the ground that it ratifies totalitarianism, demanding individuals’ unquestioning subordination to communal demands. We offer a reading of Rinrigaku that, in attempting to trace the text’s intention, disputes these arguments. We argue that Rinrigaku makes individual (...)
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  28. Watsuji Tetsurō: Bunjin Tetsugakusha No Kiseki.Sumihiko Kumano - 2009 - Iwanami Shoten.
    『古寺巡礼』『風土』等、流麗な文体により、かつて青年の熱狂をかきたてたことで知られる和辻哲郎。彼は同時に、日本近代が生んだ最大の体系的哲学書、『倫理学』の著者でもある。日清戦争前夜に生まれ第二次大戦後 におよんだその生と思考の軌跡は、いかなる可能性と限界とをはらむものだったのか。同時代の思想状況を参照しつつ辿る。.
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  29.  14
    Extraits de Fūdo.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2008 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 64 (2):327-344.
    Fudo , publié en 1935, est l’ouvrage le plus célèbre de Watsuji Tetsuro , au-delà même de son oeuvre majeure, Éthique . Il a été reçu en effet principalement comme un essai sur l’identité japonaise. Mais définir l’identité japonaise n’était pas pour Watsuji l’objectif principal de ce livre. Fudo a été conçu en réponse à Sein und Zeit de Heidegger. À l’accent mis sur la temporalité par le maître livre, il répond en mettant l’accent sur la spatialité; et (...)
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  30.  13
    L’État.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2008 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 64 (2):345-357.
    Dans la section de Rinrigaku intitulée «L’État», Watsuji Tetsuro définit l’État en tant que «communauté éthique des communautés éthiques». Ce qu’il entend par là, c’est que l’État, pour lui, est la communauté la plus englobante, celle qui n’a pas d’égoïsme et qui place chacune des communautés de rang inférieur dans une structure totalement éthique. Watsuji voit donc l’État comme la forme la plus achevée de communauté. Il considère aussi que l’État, en tant que communauté englobante, peut moralement utiliser (...)
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  31.  62
    Le statut du végétal dans Fūdo de Watsuji.Quentin Hiernaux - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:159-177.
    Apres avoir introduit les concepts de base de Fūdo, je propose une interpretation du texte problematisee autour du statut de la vegetation. Il s’agira de montrer pourquoi et comment la place que tient la vegetation joue un role mediateur fondamental en tant que principe de premiere importance, y compris et surtout ici pour la vie humaine decrite par Watsuji. Ce faisant, l’objectif est double. D’une part, montrer, a la suite d’Augustin Berque, la coherence de la visee mesologique initiale de (...)
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  32.  21
    7. Concerning Social Problems.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 78-81.
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  33.  20
    2. Dōgen’s Period of Self-Cultivation.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 34-44.
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  34.  20
    4. The Method and Meaning of Self-Cultivation.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 52-60.
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  35.  19
    1. Preface.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 25-33.
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  36.  18
    8. Criticism of Art.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 82-84.
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  37.  14
    5. Shinran’s Compassion and Dōgen’s Compassion.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 61-71.
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  38.  13
    3. The First Sermon.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 45-51.
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  39.  12
    9. Dōgen’s “Truth”.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 85-118.
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  40. Martin Heidegger Im Denken Watsuji Tetsurōs: Ein Japanischer Beitrag Zur Philosophie der Lebenswelt.Hans Peter Liederbach - 2001
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  41.  2
    Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen.Steve Bein (ed.) - 2011 - University of Hawaii Press.
    “Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen makes available in a clear and fluid translation an early classic in modern Japanese philosophy. Steve Bein’s annotations, footnotes, introduction, and commentary bridge the gap separating not only the languages but also the cultures of its original readers and its new Western audience.” —from the Foreword by Thomas P. Kasulis In 1223 the monk Dogen Kigen came to the audacious conclusion that Japanese Buddhism had become hopelessly corrupt. He undertook a dangerous pilgrimage to (...)
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  42.  11
    La Signification de l'Éthique En Tant Qu'étude de l'Être Humain.Watsuji Tetsurô, Bernard Stevens & Tadanori Takada - 2003 - Philosophie 79 (4):5.
  43.  3
    The Critical Cosmopolitanism of Watsuji Tetsurō.Michael Murphy - 2015 - European Journal of Social Theory 18 (4):507-522.
    This article outlines an approach to a critical cosmopolitan social theory derived from the thought of the Japanese philosopher, Watsuji Tetsurō. In order to develop this, his thought is positioned against the works of the British sociologist, Gerard Delanty, and the Argentinian semiotician, Walter Mignolo. This will be done through the concepts of space, time and the imagination. From their respective intellectual positions these other two have attempted to develop an approach to social theory that cannot be reduced to (...)
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  44.  41
    Reasons for the Rubble: Watsuji Tetsuro's Position in Japan's Postwar Debate About Rationality.William R. LaFleur - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (1):1-25.
    A reassessment of Watsuji Tetsurō is undertaken by bringing his changing view of the importance of Francis Bacon to bear on his understanding of the role of "rationality" in Japanese life. This reflection will enable an exploration of the relevance of the modernity / postmodernity distinction for modern Japanese philosophy.
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  45.  47
    Creative Climate: Expressive Media in the Aesthetics of Watsuji, Nishida, and Merleau-Ponty.Lucy Schultz - 2013 - Environmental Philosophy 10 (1):63-81.
    In different ways, Watsuji, Nishida, and Merleau-Ponty describe a self that extends beyond the skin through a sort of dialectic of internal/external space of perception and action, which has implications for understanding the relationship between art and nature in artistic creation. Through an exposition of Watsuji’s conception of human being in relation to a climatic milieu, Nishida’s theory of the expressive body as the site of the world’s own self-transformations, and certain claims made by Merleau-Ponty in his essays (...)
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  46. Watsuji Tetsuro, 'Rinrigaku': Ethics in Japan. [REVIEW]Steven Willett - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17:217-220.
  47. The Space Between Us: Embodiment and Intersubjectivity in Watsuji and Levinas.Joel Krueger - 2013 - In Leah Kalmanson, Frank Garrett & Sarah Mattice (eds.), Levinas and Asian Thought. Duquesne University Press. pp. 53-78.
    This essay brings Emmanuel Levinas and Watsuji Tetsurō into constructive philosophical engagement. Rather than focusing primarily on interpretation — admittedly an important dimension of comparative philosophical inquiry — my intention is to put their respective views to work, in tandem, and address the problem of the embodied social self.1 Both Watsuji and Levinas share important commonalities with respect to the embodied nature of intersubjectivity —commonalities that, moreover, put both thinkers in step with some of the concerns driving current (...)
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  48.  6
    Virtues and Ethics Within Watsuji Tetsurō’s Rinrigaku.Kyle Michael James Shuttleworth - 2020 - Asian Philosophy 30 (1):57-70.
    In the second volume of Rinrigaku, Watsuji Tetsurō focuses on developing his notion of betweenness through the ethical organisations of family, local commun...
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  49.  1
    Japanese Philosophers on Society and Culture: Nishida Kitaro, Watsuji Tetsuro, and Kuki Shuzo.Graham Mayeda - 2020 - Lexington Books.
    What is culture? What can we learn from art, architecture, and fashion about how people relate? Can cultures embody ethical and moral ideals? These are just some of the questions addressed in this book on the cultural philosophy of three preeminent Japanese philosophers of the early twentieth century, Nishida Kitarō, Watsuji Tetsurō and Kuki Shūzō.
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  50.  22
    Concretizing an Ethics of Emptiness: The Succeeding Volumes of Watsuji Tetsurô’s Ethics.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2014 - Asian Philosophy 24 (1):82-101.
    Watsuji Tetsurô’s Ethics is one of the most important works in Japanese ethical thought. But scholarly research in English has largely focused on the first of three volumes of Ethics, leaving the latter two oft-neglected. In order to balance out the views of Watsuji’s ethics, this paper focuses on the contributions of the second and third volumes of Ethics. These volumes are essential for any concrete understanding of Watsuji’s ‘ethics of emptiness’. The second volume develops the ideas (...)
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