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  1.  34
    Idealism and Objectivity: Understanding Fichte’s Jena Project.Wayne M. Martin - 1997 - Stanford University Press.
    This new interpretation of Fichte's Jena system focuses on the problem of the objectivity of consciousness.
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  2. In Defense Of Bad Infinity: A Fichtean Response To Hegel's Differenzschrift.Wayne M. Martin - 2007 - Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 55:168-187.
    Hegel's very first acknowledged publication was, among other things, an attack on Fichte. In 1801, Hegel was still laboring in almost complete obscurity, while Fichte was an international sensation, though already somewhat past the peak of his meteoric career. In the 1801 Differenzschrift, Hegel cut his teeth by criticizing Fichte's already widelycriticised Wissenschaftslehre, and by demonstrating that Schelling's philosophical system was not simply to be equated with it. Fichte himself never bothered to respond to Hegel's criticisms; indeed he never publicly (...)
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  3. Nothing more or less than logic: General logic, transcendental philosophy, and Kant's repudiation of Fichte's Wissenschaftslehre.Wayne M. Martin - 2003 - Topoi 22 (1):29-39.
    In this paper I lay the foundations for an understanding of one of Fichte's most neglected and least understood texts: the late lecture course on Transcendental Logic. I situate this work in the context of Fichte's lifelong struggle with the problem of understanding the relation between logic and philosophy – a problem that I show to figure centrally both in Fichte's own revolutionary thinking and in his response to Kant's notorious denunciation of the Wissenschaftslehre. By attending to this context we (...)
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  4.  10
    Descartes and the Phenomenological Tradition.Wayne M. Martin - 2007 - In Janet Broughton & John Carriero (eds.), A Companion to Descartes. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 496–512.
    This chapter contains section titled: Husserl's Cartesianism Heidegger's Ontological Critique References and Further Reading.
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  5. Descartes and the Phenomenological Tradition.Wayne M. Martin - 2007 - In Martin Wayne (ed.).
    The spectre of Descartes figured as a perpetual presence in much of twentieth century philosophy, but nearly always as an emblem for positions to be avoided. Cartesian foundationalism in epistemology, the ontological dualism of mind and body, the associated conception of the mind as a substance, and as a “thing that thinks” – all these have figured in recent philosophy as positions to be refuted or simply renounced, the absurda in one or another reductio argument. But for one prominent twentieth (...)
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  6.  50
    In defense of bad infinity.Wayne M. Martin - 2007
    Hegel’s very first acknowledged publication was, among other things, an attack on Fichte.1 In 1801, Hegel was still laboring in almost complete obscurity, while Fichte was an international sensation, though already somewhat past the peak of his meteoric career. In the 1801 Differenzschrift, Hegel cut his teeth by criticizing Fichte’s already widely-criticized Wissenschaftslehre, and by demonstrating that Schelling’s philosophical system was not simply to be equated with it. Fichte himself never bothered to respond to Hegel’s criticisms; indeed he never publicly (...)
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  7.  53
    Husserl and the logic of consciousness.Wayne M. Martin - 2005 - In David Woodruff Smith & Amie Lynn Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press. pp. 203-221.
    This chapter explores one of the most problematic theoretical commitments of Edmund Husserl's phenomenological projects: the idea of a logic of consciousness or phenomeno-logic. It shows why Husserl is committed to this idea and why it is so out of step with contemporary approaches in the philosophy of mind. It then tries to render the idea intelligible along two paths. First, to take the idea of a logic of consciousness seriously, we must challenge our entrenched atomistic assumptions about conscious states. (...)
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  8.  23
    In Defense of Bad Infinity: A Fichtean Response to Hegel's Differenzschrift.Wayne M. Martin - 2007 - Hegel Bulletin 28 (1-2):168-187.
    Hegel's very first acknowledged publication was, among other things, an attack on Fichte. In 1801, Hegel was still laboring in almost complete obscurity, while Fichte was an international sensation, though already somewhat past the peak of his meteoric career. In the 1801Differenzschrift, Hegel cut his teeth by criticizing Fichte's already widelycriticisedWissenschaftslehre, and by demonstrating that Schelling's philosophical system was not simply to be equated with it. Fichte himself never bothered to respond to Hegel's criticisms; indeed he never publicly acknowledged their (...)
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  9.  63
    Husserl’s relapse? concerning a fregean challenge to phenomenology.Wayne M. Martin - 1999 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 42 (3-4):343-369.
    An influential interpretation of phenomenology construes Husserl's project as an attempt to generalize the Fregean notion of sense- an attempt to extend Frege's analysis of the structure of meaningful expressions to a more general account of the structure of meaning in experience . Michael Dummett has articulated a broadly Fregean critique of this Husserlian program, arguing that the project is misguided and retrograde-a relapse into the psychologism and idealism that Frege sought to avoid. A defense of Husserl is offered, based (...)
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  10.  13
    European and American Philosophers.John Marenbon, Douglas Kellner, Richard D. Parry, Gregory Schufreider, Ralph McInerny, Andrea Nye, R. M. Dancy, Vernon J. Bourke, A. A. Long, James F. Harris, Thomas Oberdan, Paul S. MacDonald, Véronique M. Fóti, F. Rosen, James Dye, Pete A. Y. Gunter, Lisa J. Downing, W. J. Mander, Peter Simons, Maurice Friedman, Robert C. Solomon, Nigel Love, Mary Pickering, Andrew Reck, Simon J. Evnine, Iakovos Vasiliou, John C. Coker, Georges Dicker, James Gouinlock, Paul J. Welty, Gianluigi Oliveri, Jack Zupko, Tom Rockmore, Wayne M. Martin, Ladelle McWhorter, Hans-Johann Glock, Georgia Warnke, John Haldane, Joseph S. Ullian, Steven Rieber, David Ingram, Nick Fotion, George Rainbolt, Thomas Sheehan, Gerald J. Massey, Barbara D. Massey, David E. Cooper, David Gauthier, James M. Humber, J. N. Mohanty, Michael H. Dearmey, Oswald O. Schrag, Ralf Meerbote, George J. Stack, John P. Burgess, Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Nicholas Jolley, Adriaan T. Peperzak, E. J. Lowe, William D. Richardson, Stephen Mulhall & C. - 2017 - In Robert L. Arrington (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophers. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 109–557.
    Peter Abelard (1079–1142 ce) was the most wide‐ranging philosopher of the twelfth century. He quickly established himself as a leading teacher of logic in and near Paris shortly after 1100. After his affair with Heloise, and his subsequent castration, Abelard became a monk, but he returned to teaching in the Paris schools until 1140, when his work was condemned by a Church Council at Sens. His logical writings were based around discussion of the “Old Logic”: Porphyry's Isagoge, aristotle'S Categories and (...)
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  11.  15
    Bubbles and Skulls: the Phenomenology of Self‐Consciousness in Dutch Still‐Life Painting.Wayne M. Martin - 2006 - In Hubert L. Dreyfus & Mark A. Wrathall (eds.), A Companion to Phenomenology and Existentialism. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 559–584.
    This chapter contains sections titled: A Very Brief Primer on Dutch Still‐Life Painting Bubbles and Skulls: Pieter Claesz and the Transformation of a Visual Theme The Temporality of Self‐Consciousness in a Late Painting of David Bailly A Concluding Word about Two Portraits.
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  12. German Idealism: The Struggle Against Subjectivism 1781–1801.Wayne M. Martin - 2004 - Mind 113 (449):150-154.
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  13. Conscience and consciousness: Rousseau's critique of the stoic theory of Oikeosis.Wayne M. Martin - 2006
    I set out to trace the history of a distinctive conception of self-consciousness -- from its first formulation in the 3rd century BC, through its reception among Roman philosophers around the 1st century AD, and finally to its fate in Enlightenment thought of the 18th century. I use this history to clarify and defend an idea that figured centrally in the history of philosophy, but which has recently come under sustained attack: the idea that human beings are in some very (...)
     
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  14. Bubbles and skulls: The phenomenological structure of self-consciousness in dutch still-life painting.Wayne M. Martin - 2005 - In M. Wrathal & Hubert L. Dreyfus (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Phenomenology and Existentialism. Blackwell.
    In this paper I investigate the representation of self-consciousness in the still life tradition in the Netherlands around the time of Descartes’ residence there. I treat the paintings of this tradition as both a phenomenological resource and as a phenomenological undertaking in their own right. I begin with an introductory overview of the still life tradition, with particular attention to semiotic structures characteristic of the vanitas still life. I then focus my analysis on the representation of self-consciousness in this tradition, (...)
     
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  15.  13
    Claesz in the window.Wayne M. Martin - 2001 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 44 (4):481 – 499.
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  16.  49
    Fichte's Logical Legacy: Thetic Judgment from the Wissenschaftslehre to Brentano.Wayne M. Martin - 2010 - In .
  17. Fichte's Transcendental Philosophy: The Original Duplicity of Intelligence and Will.Wayne M. Martin - 2000 - Mind 109 (435):668-676.
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  18.  32
    Language and German Idealism: Fichte's Linguistic Philosophy.Wayne M. Martin - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):634-635.
  19. Special Issue New Work in Kant Studies.Wayne M. Martin - 2003 - Taylor & Francis.
     
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  20. The Foundations of German Idealism: Fichte's "Wissenschaftslehre" and the Referentiality of Consciousness.Wayne M. Martin - 1993 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    Since Kant, theorists of human consciousness have often made the claim that man's cognitive or theoretical forms of consciousness are rooted in practical forms of consciousness or in one or another form of practice . Although the ancestry of this view can be traced to Rousseau and Kant, it is among the post-Kantian idealists that it first comes to full expression. I examine the emergence of this theme in the first formulations of post-Kantian idealism: the Jena texts of Johann Gottlieb (...)
     
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  21.  38
    The Judgment Stroke and the Truth-Predicate.Wayne M. Martin - 2003 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 3:27-52.
  22.  42
    The Judgment Stroke and the Truth-Predicate.Wayne M. Martin - 2003 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 3:27-52.
  23.  72
    Transcendental philosophy and atheism.Wayne M. Martin - 2007 - European Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):109–130.
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  24.  22
    Transcendental Philosophy and Atheism.Wayne M. Martin - 2008 - European Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):109-130.
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  25.  11
    Zu den Zielen von Fichtes Jenaer Wissenschaftslehre.Wayne M. Martin - 1996 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 44 (3):409-428.
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  26.  10
    Fichte's Transcendental Philosophy. The Original Duplicity of Intelligence and Will.Wayne M. Martin - 2000 - Philosophy 75 (292):309-312.
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  27.  41
    Fichtes anti-dogmatism.Wayne M. Martin - 1992 - Ratio 5 (2):129-146.
  28.  50
    Brandom, Tales of the Mighty Dead: Historical Essays in the Metaphysics of Intentionality. [REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (3):395-398.
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  29.  11
    Fichte's "Wissenschaftslehre" of 1794: A Commentary on Part I (review). [REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (4):693-695.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:BOOK REVIEWS 693 between the world of our sense perception and the world of objects "in and for themselves," had suggested that the failure to appreciate this distinction was a "Grundvorurteil" common to all controversies, and, finally, had argued for the need to distinguish between the self revealed in "inner sense" and the self as it is in itself, unknowable to us. In his extremely valuable article, "Funzioni logiche (...)
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  30.  29
    Ameriks, Karl, ed. The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism. [REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):373-374.
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  31.  55
    Book review. Husserl and Heidegger on human experience Pierre Keller. [REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 2001 - Mind 110 (438):491-495.
  32.  53
    Fichte’s Transcendental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 2001 - The Owl of Minerva 32 (2):201-205.
  33.  14
    Fichte’s Transcendental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 2001 - The Owl of Minerva 32 (2):201-205.
    In a well-known passage from the Analytic of the second Critique, Kant makes reference to what he calls “an unavoidable need of human reason”—the need to find “the unity of the entire pure faculty of reason.” The remark is made in passing, and Kant himself deals only obliquely with the question as to how this need might be met. Indeed, two centuries later we may be inclined to say that Kant’s legacy was less to unite theoretical and practical reason than (...)
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  34.  25
    Review of David Woodruff Smith, Husserl[REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (9).
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  35.  26
    Review of Frederick Neuhouser, 'Rousseau's Theodicy of Self-Love: Evil, Rationality, and the Drive for Recognition'. [REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (8).
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  36.  8
    The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism. [REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):373-373.
    The Cambridge series of companions already includes a volume on Kant, another on Hegel, and yet a third promised on Fichte. So it may come as a surprise to find this further volume devoted to German idealism as a whole. The decision to add to the bookshelf of companions obviously makes financial sense for Cambridge, but in this case it is also amply justified by the interesting and provocative set of essays gathered together here by Karl Ameriks. The broader scope (...)
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  37.  37
    The Self and Its Body in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. [REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (4):850-851.
    Russon proposes an intriguing project: a phenomenology of embodiment that uses Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit as its text and structure—a Phänomenologie des Körpers from Hegel's Phänomenologie des Geistes. What we are given is not commentary or secondary literature on Hegel's text; rather, Russon is making philosophical use of Hegel's dialectical narrative and conceptual framework in an independent theoretical enterprise. Nonetheless, this remains a recognizably Hegelian undertaking. Accordingly, we should not be surprised to find that Russon's phenomenology of the body is (...)
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  38.  24
    The Self and Its Body in Hegel's Phenomenology of SpiritJohn Russon Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997, xiv + 199 pp., $60.00. [REVIEW]Wayne M. Martin - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (4):850-852.
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