Results for 'Web Science Social Machines'

999 found
Order:
  1.  15
    Social Machines: A Philosophical Engineering.Spyridon Palermos - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (5):953-978.
    In Weaving the Web, Berners-Lee defines Social Machines as biotechnologically hybrid Web-processes on the basis of which, “high-level activities, which have occurred just within one human’s brain, will occur among even larger more interconnected groups of people acting as if the shared a larger intuitive brain”. The analysis and design of Social Machines has already started attracting considerable attention both within the industry and academia. Web science, however, is still missing a clear definition of what (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  22
    Where the Smart Things Are: Social Machines and the Internet of Things.Paul Smart, Aastha Madaan & Wendy Hall - 2019 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):551-575.
    The emergence of large-scale social media systems, such as Wikipedia, Facebook, and Twitter, has given rise to a new multi-disciplinary effort based around the concept of social machines. For the most part, this research effort has limited its attention to the study of Web-based systems. It has also, perhaps unsurprisingly, tended to highlight the social scientific relevance of such systems. The present paper seeks to expand the scope of the social machine research effort to encompass (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Minds Online: The Interface Between Web Science, Cognitive Science, and the Philosophy of Mind.Paul Smart, Robert William Clowes & Richard Heersmink - 2017 - Foundations and Trends in Web Science 6 (1-2):1-234.
    Alongside existing research into the social, political and economic impacts of the Web, there is a need to study the Web from a cognitive and epistemic perspective. This is particularly so as new and emerging technologies alter the nature of our interactive engagements with the Web, transforming the extent to which our thoughts and actions are shaped by the online environment. Situated and ecological approaches to cognition are relevant to understanding the cognitive significance of the Web because of the (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. A Brain in a Vat Cannot Break Out: Why the Singularity Must Be Extended, Embedded and Embodied.Francis Heylighen & Center Leo Apostel Ecco - 2012 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (1-2):126-142.
    The present paper criticizes Chalmers's discussion of the Singularity, viewed as the emergence of a superhuman intelligence via the self-amplifying development of artificial intelligence. The situated and embodied view of cognition rejects the notion that intelligence could arise in a closed 'brain-in-a-vat' system, because intelligence is rooted in a high-bandwidth, sensory-motor interaction with the outside world. Instead, it is proposed that superhuman intelligence can emerge only in a distributed fashion, in the form of a self-organizing network of humans, computers, and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  1
    “Hypothetical Machines”: The Science Fiction Dreams of Cold War Social Science.Rebecca Lemov - 2010 - Isis 101 (2):401-411.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  92
    Simulation as Formal and Generative Social Science: The Very Idea.Nuno David, Jaime Sichman & Helder Coelho - 2007 - In Carlos Gershenson, Diederik Aerts & Bruce Edmonds (eds.), Worldviews, Science, and Us: Philosophy and Complexity. World Scientific. pp. 266--275.
    The formal and empirical-generative perspectives of computation are demonstrated to be inadequate to secure the goals of simulation in the social sciences. Simulation does not resemble formal demonstrations or generative mechanisms that deductively explain how certain models are sufficient to generate emergent macrostructures of interest. The description of scientific practice implies additional epistemic conceptions of scientific knowledge. Three kinds of knowledge that account for a comprehensive description of the discipline were identified: formal, empirical and intentional knowledge. The use of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  5
    You’Ve Been Tagged! : Employers and Web-Based Social Networking.William P. Smith - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:35-42.
    Social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook have become among the most popular sites on the Internet. The extent of self-disclosure on these sites makes them an attractive source of information for employers. This paper reviews the advantages and criticisms of SNS use during the recruiting and selection process, the existing research on SNS and consider legal and normative implications of this trend.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  78
    What an Entangled Web We Weave: An Information-Centric Approach to Time-Evolving Socio-Technical Systems.Markus Luczak-Roesch, Kieron O’Hara, Jesse David Dinneen & Ramine Tinati - 2018 - Minds and Machines 28 (4):709-733.
    A new layer of complexity, constituted of networks of information token recurrence, has been identified in socio-technical systems such as the Wikipedia online community and the Zooniverse citizen science platform. The identification of this complexity reveals that our current understanding of the actual structure of those systems, and consequently the structure of the entire World Wide Web, is incomplete, which raises novel questions for data science research but also from the perspective of social epistemology. Here we establish (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  59
    Social Media and the Production of Knowledge: A Return to Little Science?Leah A. Lievrouw - 2010 - Social Epistemology 24 (3):219-237.
    In the classic study Little science, big science (New York: Columbia University Press, 1963), Derek Price traces the historical shift from what he calls little science?exemplified by early?modern ?invisible colleges? of scientific amateurs and enthusiasts engaged in small?scale, informal interactions and personal correspondence?to 20th?century big science, dominated by professional scientists and wealthy institutions, where scientific information (primarily in print form and its analogues) was mass?produced, marketed and circulated on a global scale. This article considers whether the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  50
    Web‐Based Experiments for the Study of Collective Social Dynamics in Cultural Markets.Matthew J. Salganik & Duncan J. Watts - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (3):439-468.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  6
    Citation of Retracted Articles in Engineering: A Study of the Web of Science Database.Priscila Rubbo, Luiz Alberto Pilatti & Claudia Tania Picinin - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (8):661-679.
    The objective of this study is to compare the quantity of citations that retracted and nonretracted articles received in engineering based on articles indexed in the Web of Science database and published between 1945 and 2015. For data analysis, the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences was used along with the Kolmogorov–Smirnov, Mann–Whitney, Tukey–Kramer tests and descriptive statistics. The data set included 238 retracted and 236 nonretracted articles, with the retracted articles cited 2,348 times and nonretracted articles cited (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  36
    Co-Production on the Web: Social Software as a Means of Collaborative Value Creation in Web-Based Infrastructures.Tassilo Pellegrini - 2007 - International Review of Information Ethics 7 (9):1-6.
    The concept of co-production was originally introduced by political science to explain citizen participation in the provision of public goods. The concept was quickly adopted in business research targeting the question how users could be voluntarily integrated into industrial production settings to improve the development of goods and services on an honorary basis. With the emergence of the Social Software and web-based colla-borative infrastructures the concept of co-production gains importance as a theoretical framework for the collaborative production of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  19
    Science, Social Theory and Public Knowledge.Alan Irwin - 2003 - Open University Press.
    How might social theory, public understanding of science and science policy best inform one another? What have been the key features of science-society relations in the modern world? How are we to re-think science-society relations in the context of globalization, hybridity and changing patterns of governance? This topical and unique book draws together the three key perspectives on science-society relations: public understanding of science, scientific and public governance, and social theory. The book (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  14. States of Knowledge: The Co-Production of Science and Social Order.Sheila Jasanoff (ed.) - 2004 - Routledge.
    In the past twenty years, the field of science and technology studies (S&TS) has made considerable progress toward illuminating the relationship between scientific knowledge and political power. These insights have not yet been synthesized or presented in a form that systematically highlights the connections between S&TS and other social sciences. This timely collection of essays by some of the leading scholars in the field attempts to fill that gap. The book develops the theme of "co-production", showing how scientific (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  15.  24
    Toward Some Circuitry of Ethical Robots or an Observational Science of the Genesis of Social Evaluation in the Mind-Like Behavior of Artifacts.W. S. McCulloch - 1956 - Acta Biotheoretica 11 (3-4):147-156.
    Modern knowledge of servo systems and computing machines makes it possible to specify a circuit that can and will induce the rules and winning moves in a game like chess when they are given only ostensibly, that is, by playing against opponents who quit when illegal or losing moves are made. Such circuits enjoy a value social in the sense that it is shared by the players.La connaissance moderne des servomécanismes et des machines à calculer permet de (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Net Work: Ethics and Values in Web Design.Helen Kennedy - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- List of Figures and Tables -- Acknowledgements -- PART I: FRAMING WEB DESIGN -- A Book About Web Design -- A Framework for Thinking About Web Design -- A Brief History of Web Design -- PART II: ETHICS AND VALUES IN WEB DESIGN -- Web Standards and the Self-Regulation of Web Designers -- The Fragile Ethics of Web Accessibility -- Going the Extra Mile? Web Accessibility for People with Intellectual Disabilities -- Does User Activity Threaten (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  72
    Scientific Practice and Ordinary Action: Ethnomethodology and Social Studies of Science.Michael Lynch - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophers, historians, and sociologists of science have grown interested in the daily practices of scientists. Recent studies have drawn linkages between scientific innovations and more ordinary procedures, craft skills, and sources of sponsorship. These studies dispute the idea that science is the application of a unified method or the outgrowth of a progressive history of ideas. This book critically reviews arguments and empirical studies in two areas of sociology that have played a significant role in the 'sociological turn' (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   83 citations  
  18. The Role of Imagination in Social Scientific Discovery: Why Machine Discoverers Will Need Imagination Algorithms.Michael Stuart - 2019 - In Mark Addis, Fernand Gobet & Peter Sozou (eds.), Scientific Discovery in the Social Sciences. Springer Verlag.
    When philosophers discuss the possibility of machines making scientific discoveries, they typically focus on discoveries in physics, biology, chemistry and mathematics. Observing the rapid increase of computer-use in science, however, it becomes natural to ask whether there are any scientific domains out of reach for machine discovery. For example, could machines also make discoveries in qualitative social science? Is there something about humans that makes us uniquely suited to studying humans? Is there something about (...) that would bar them from such activity? A close look at the methodology of interpretive social science reveals several abilities necessary to make a social scientific discovery, and one capacity necessary to possess any of them is imagination. For machines to make discoveries in social science, therefore, they must possess imagination algorithms. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Freedom in an Age of Science and Machines.D. R. Scott - 1937 - Journal of Social Philosophy and Jurisprudence 2 (4):317.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Popper, Rationality and the Possibility of Social Science.Danny Frederick - 2013 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 28 (1):61-75.
    Social science employs teleological explanations which depend upon the rationality principle, according to which people exhibit instrumental rationality. Popper points out that people also exhibit critical rationality, the tendency to stand back from, and to question or criticise, their views. I explain how our critical rationality impugns the explanatory value of the rationality principle and thereby threatens the very possibility of social science. I discuss the relationship between instrumental and critical rationality and show how we can (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. The Social Origins of Modern Science.Edgar Zilsel - 2000 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    The most outstanding feature of this book is that here, for the first time, is made available in a single volume all the important historical essays Edgar Zilsel (1891-1944) published during WWII on the emergence of modern science. This edition also contains one previously unpublished essay and an extended version of an essay published earlier. In these essays, Zilsel developed the now famous thesis, named after him, that science came into being when, in the late Middle Ages, the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22.  23
    Editors' Overview Perspectives on Teaching Social Responsibility to Students in Science and Engineering.Henk Zandvoort, Tom Børsen, Michael Deneke & Stephanie J. Bird - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1413-1438.
    Global society is facing formidable current and future problems that threaten the prospects for justice and peace, sustainability, and the well-being of humanity both now and in the future. Many of these problems are related to science and technology and to how they function in the world. If the social responsibility of scientists and engineers implies a duty to safeguard or promote a peaceful, just and sustainable world society, then science and engineering education should empower students to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  23.  30
    Modeling the Social Organization of Science.Carlo Martini & Manuela Fernández Pinto - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 7 (2):221-238.
    At least since Kuhn’s Structure, philosophers have studied the influence of social factors in science’s pursuit of truth and knowledge. More recently, formal models and computer simulations have allowed philosophers of science and social epistemologists to dig deeper into the detailed dynamics of scientific research and experimentation, and to develop very seemingly realistic models of the social organization of science. These models purport to be predictive of the optimal allocations of factors, such as diversity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  24. Michael Polanyi and His Generation: Origins of the Social Construction of Science.Mary Jo Nye - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    Scientific culture in Europe and the refugee generation -- Germany and Weimar Berlin as the City of Science -- Origins of a social perspective: doing physical chemistry in Weimar Berlin -- Chemical dynamics and social dynamics in Berlin and Manchester -- Liberalism and the economic foundations of the "Republic of Science" -- Scientific freedom and the social functions of science -- Political foundations of the philosophies of science of Popper, Kuhn, and Polanyi -- (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  25.  83
    The Scientific Dimensions of Social Knowledge and Their Distant Echoes in 20th-Century American Philosophy of Science.Philip Mirowski - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):283-326.
    The widespread impression that recent philosophy of science has pioneered exploration of the “social dimensions of scientific knowledge” is shown to be in error, partly due to a lack of appreciation of historical precedent, and partly due to a misunderstanding of how the social sciences and philosophy have been intertwined over the last century. This paper argues that the referents of “democracy” are an important key in the American context, and that orthodoxies in the philosophy of (...) tend to be molded by the actual regimes of science organization within which they are embedded. These theses are illustrated by consideration of three representative philosophers of science: John Dewey, Hans Reichenbach, and Philip Kitcher.Author Keywords: Social dimensions of science; Logical positivism; Democracy; Context of discovery/justification; Goals of science. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  26. Science in Society: An Introduction to Social Studies of Science.Massimiano Bucchi - 2004 - Routledge.
    The world around us has been shaped by science and man's relationship to it, and in recent years sociologists have been increasingly preoccupied with the latter. In Science in Society , Massimiano Bucchi provides a brief and approachable introduction to this sociological issue. Without assuming any scientific background, Bucchi provides clear summaries of all the major theoretical positions within the sociology of science, using many fascinating examples to illustrate them. Theories covered include Thomas Kuhn's theory of scientific (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  27.  29
    Making Sense of Science: Understanding the Social Study of Science.Steven Yearley - 2005 - Sage Publications.
    `Fluid, readable and accessible ... I found the overall quality of the book to be excellent. It provides an overview of major (and preceding) developments in the field of science studies. It examines landmark works, authors, concepts and approaches ... I will certainly use this book as one of the course texts' Eileen Crist, Associate Professor, Science & Technology in Society, Virginia Tech Science is at the heart of contemporary society and is therefore central to the (...) sciences. Yet science studies has often encountered resistance from social scientists. This book attempts to remedy this by giving the most extensive, thorough and best argued account of the field and explaining to social scientists why science matters to them. This is a landmark book that demystifies science studies and successfully bridges the divide between social theory and the sociology of science. Illustrated with relevant, illuminating examples, it provides the ideal guide to science studies and social theory. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  28.  28
    Crowdsourced Science: Sociotechnical Epistemology in the E-Research Paradigm.David Watson & Luciano Floridi - 2018 - Synthese 195 (2):741-764.
    Recent years have seen a surge in online collaboration between experts and amateurs on scientific research. In this article, we analyse the epistemological implications of these crowdsourced projects, with a focus on Zooniverse, the world’s largest citizen science web portal. We use quantitative methods to evaluate the platform’s success in producing large volumes of observation statements and high impact scientific discoveries relative to more conventional means of data processing. Through empirical evidence, Bayesian reasoning, and conceptual analysis, we show how (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. A Challenge to Social Constructivism About Science.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2013 - Ethos: Dialogues in Philosophy and Social Sciences 6 (2):150-156.
    This paper presents a challenge to the coherence of social constructivism about science. It introduces an objection according to which social constructivism appeals to the authority of science regarding the nature of reality and so cannot coherently deny that authority. The challenge is how to avoid this incoherence.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  12
    The Rehabilitation of Common Sense: Social Representations, Science and Cognitive Polyphasia.Sandra Jovchelovitch - 2008 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (4):431-448.
    In Psychoanalysis, its image and its public Moscovici introduced the theory of social representations and took further the project of rehabilitating common sense. In this paper I examine this project through a consideration of the problem of cognitive polyphasia, and the continuity and discontinuity between different systems of knowing. Focusing on the relations between science and common sense. I ask why, despite considerable evidence to the contrary, the scientific imagination tends to deny its relation to common sense and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  31.  50
    Ethics and Social Science: Which Kind of Co-Operation? [REVIEW]Dieter Birnbacher - 1999 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (4):319-336.
    The relation between ethics and social science is often conceived as complementary, both disciplines cooperating in the solution of concrete moral problems. Against this, the paper argues that not only applied ethics but even certain parts of general ethics have to incorporate sociological and psychological data and theories from the start. Applied ethics depends on social science in order to asses the impact of its own principles on the concrete realities which these principles are to regulate (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  32. Truth and Social Science: From Hegel to Deconstruction.Ross Abbinnett - 1998 - Sage Publications.
    The noble aim of sociologists to "tell the truth" has sometimes involved ignoble assumptions about human beings. In this major discussion of truth in the social science, Ross Abbinnett traces the debate on truth from the "objectifying powers" of Kant through more than 200 years of critique and reformulation to the unraveling of truth by Lyotard, Foucault, and Derrida. Truth and Social Science gives students an exciting and accessible guide to the main sociological treatments of truth (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  41
    Social Web and Identity: A Likely Encounter. [REVIEW]Thierry Nabeth - 2009 - Identity in the Information Society 2 (1):1-5.
    The Web 2.0, with online social technologies such as social networking services, blogs, wikis, or microbloging, has brought the vision of the Internet as a social landscape in which people are engaged in a multitude of social activities. This editorial of the special issue ‘Social Web and Identity’ discusses the importance of identity in the context of the Social Web, introducing the different papers of this special issue and the different aspects associated to these (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  22
    Editorial: Moral Luck, Social Networking Sites, and Trust on the Web. [REVIEW]Maria C. Bottis, Frances S. Grodzinsky & Herman T. Tavani - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (4):297-298.
  35.  17
    Social Studies of Science and Science Teaching.Gábor Kutrovátz & Gábor Áron Zemplén - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 1119-1141.
    If any nature of science perspective is to be incorporated in science-related curricula, it is hard to imagine a satisfactory didactic toolkit that neglects the social studies of science, the academic field of study of the institutional structures and networks of science. Knowledge production takes place in a world populated by actors, instruments, and ideas, and various epistemic cultures are responsible for providing the concepts, abstractions, and techniques that slowly trickle down the information pathways to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. The Social Organisation of Science as a Question for Philosophy of Science.Jaana Eigi - 2016 - Dissertation, University of Tartu
    Philosophy of science is showing an increasing interest in the social aspects and the social organisation of science—the ways social values and social interactions and structures play a role in the creation of knowledge and the ways this role should be taken into account in the organisation of science and science policy. My thesis explores a number of issues related to this theme. I argue that a prominent approach to the social (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  23
    Historical and Epistemological Reflections on the Culture of Machines Around the Renaissance: How Science and Technique Work?Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti - 2014 - Acta Baltica Historiae Et Philosophiae Scientiarum 2 (2):20-42.
    This paper is divided into two parts, this being the first one. The second is entitled ‘Historical and Epistemological Reflections on the Culture of Machines around Renaissance: Machines, Machineries and Perpetual Motion’ and will be published in Acta Baltica Historiae et Philosophiae Scientiarum in 2015. Based on our recent studies, we provide here a historical and epistemological feature on the role played by machines and machineries. Ours is an epistemological thesis based on a series of historical examples (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  67
    Science and Social Science: An Introduction.Malcolm Williams - 2000 - Routledge.
    Is social science really a science at all, and if so in what sense? This is the first real question that any course on the philosophy of the social sciences must tackle. In this brief introduction, Malcolm Williams gives the students the grounding that will enable them to discuss the issues involved with confidence.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  39.  21
    Business Ethics: A Synthesis of Normative Philosophy and Empirical Social Science.Carroll Underwood Stephens - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (2):145-155.
    A synthesis of the two theoretical bases of business ethics-normative philosophy and descriptive social science-is called for. Examples from the literature are used to demonstrate that to ignore the descriptive aspects of moral behavior is to risk unreal philosophy, and that to ignore the normative aspects is to risk amoral social science. Business ethics is portrayed as a single unified field, in which fact-value distinctions are inappropriate.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  40.  41
    Social Constructivism and Methodology of Science.Gabriel Târziu - 2017 - Synthesis Philosophica 32 (2):449-466.
    Scientific practice is a type of social practice, and every enterprise of knowledge in general exhibits important social dimensions. But should the fact that scientific practice is born out of and tied to the collaborative efforts of the members of a social group be taken to affect the products of these practices as well? In this paper, I will try in to give an affirmative answer to this question. My strategy will be to argue that the aim (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. “Ethics Wars”: Reflections on the Antagonism Between Bioethicists and Social Science Observers of Biomedicine1. [REVIEW]Klaus Hoeyer - 2006 - Human Studies 29 (2):203 - 227.
    Social scientists often lament the fact that philosophically trained ethicists pay limited attention to the insights they generate. This paper presents an overview of tendencies in sociological and anthropological studies of morality, ethics and bioethics, and suggests that a lack in philosophical interest might be related to a tendency among social scientists to employ either a deficit model (social science perspectives accommodate the sense of context that philosophical ethics lacks), a replacement model (social scientists have (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  42. National Science Foundation Patronage of Social Science, 1970s and 1980s: Congressional Scrutiny, Advocacy Network, and the Prestige of Economics. [REVIEW]Tiago Mata & Tom Scheiding - 2012 - Minerva 50 (4):423-449.
    Research in the social sciences received generous patronage in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Research was widely perceived as providing solutions to emerging social problems. That generosity came under increased contest in the late 1970s. Although these trends held true for all of the social sciences, this essay explores the various ways by which economists in particular reacted to and resisted the patronage cuts that were proposed in the first budgets of the Reagan administration. Economists’ response (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  40
    Naturalism and Social Science: A Post-Empiricist Philosophy of Social Science.David Thomas - 1979 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 1979 text addresses the ways in which the dominant theories in large areas of Western social science have been subject to strong criticisms, particularly ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  44.  39
    Alfred Schutz’s Postulates of Social Science: Clarification and Ammendments.Jonathan Tuckett - 2014 - Human Studies 37 (4):469-488.
    It is the contention of this paper that the majority of scholars deal with a simplified notion of Schutz’s understanding of social science. Specifically they tend to view Schutz’s understanding of social science as containing only three postulates: logical consistency, subjective interpretation, and adequacy. However, such considerations tend to focus primarily upon “Common-Sense and Scientific Interpretation of Human Action” and only engage with Schutz’s other essays in a tertiary manner. This paper argues that only by giving (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  14
    Nanoethics and Policy Education: A Case Study of Social Science Coursework and Student Engagement with Emerging Technologies.Jessica Smith Rolston, Skylar Huzyk Zilliox, Corinne Packard, Carl Mitcham & Brian Zaharatos - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):217-225.
    The article analyzes the integration of a module on nanotechnology, ethics, and policy into a required second-year social science course at a technological university. It investigates not simply the effectiveness of student learning about the technical aspects of nanotechnology but about how issues explored in an interdisciplinary social science course might influence student opinions about the potential of nanotechnology to benefit the developing world. The authors find a correlation between student opinions about the risks and benefits (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Book Review-Contemporary Philosophy of Social Science[REVIEW]Mahesh Ananth - 2001 - Philosophia 28 (1-4):539-555.
    Book Review of Brian Fay's Contemporary Philosophy of Social Science.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  32
    Social Constructivism in Science and Technology Studies.Michael Lynch - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (1):101-112.
    Berger and Luckmann’s concept of “social construction” has been widely adopted in many fields of the humanities and social sciences in the half-century since they wrote The Social Construction of Reality. One field in which constructivism was especially provocative was in Science and Technology Studies, where it was expanded beyond the social domain to encompass the practices and contents of contemporary natural science. This essay discusses the relationship between social construction in STS and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  29
    Philosophy and Science in the Social Theory of the Frankfurt School.Halina Walentowicz & Maciej Bańkowski - 2009 - Dialogue and Universalism 19 (3-5):209-225.
    The present essay focuses on the Frankfurt School’s views on relations between philosophy and science. The author specifically concentrates on Horkheimer, the School’s leader, and Habermas, its most prominent contemporary representative. In her reconstruction of the Frankfurt School’s approach to the dependencies between philosophy and science the author—similarly to the Frankfurt theoreticians—abstains from treating it abstractly, instead placing it in its social and historiosophical context. The essay’s leading thesis is that the Frankfurt School sees philosophical self-reflection as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  8
    Tidescapes: Notes on a Shi -Inflected Social Science.John Law & Wen-Yuan Lin - 2018 - Journal of World Philosophies 3 (1):1-16.
    What might it be to write a post-colonial social science? And how might the intellectual legacy of Chinese classical philosophy—for instance Sun Tzu and Lao Tzu—contribute to such a project? Reversing the more usual social science practice in which EuroAmerican concepts are applied in other global locations, this paper instead considers how a “Chinese” term, _shi_ might be used to explore the UK’s 2001 foot-and-mouth epidemic. Drawing on anthropological insights into mis/translation between different worlds and their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  44
    Popper's Views on Natural and Social Science. Simkin (ed.) - 1993 - Brill.
    Explains Popper's views on natural and social science, ranging in Part I from metaphysical considerations to his interpretation of the formalism of quantum mechanics, and in Part II from the errors of historicism and holism to the roles of theoretical models, institutions, traditions and history.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 999