Results for 'Wellbeing'

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  1. Emotions and Wellbeing.Christine Tappolet & Mauro Rossi - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):461-474.
    In this paper, we consider the question of whether there exists an essential relation between emotions and wellbeing. We distinguish three ways in which emotions and wellbeing might be essentially related: constitutive, causal, and epistemic. We argue that, while there is some room for holding that emotions are constitutive ingredients of an individual’s wellbeing, all the attempts to characterise the causal and epistemic relations in an essentialist way are vulnerable to some important objections. We conclude that the (...)
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  2. Virtue, Happiness, and Wellbeing.Mauro Rossi & Christine Tappolet - 2016 - The Monist 99 (2):112-127.
    What is the relation between virtue and wellbeing? Our claim is that, under certain conditions, virtue necessarily tends to have a positive impact on an individual’s wellbeing. This is so because of the connection between virtue and psychological happiness, on the one hand, and between psychological happiness and wellbeing, on the other hand. In particular we defend three claims: that virtue is constituted by a disposition to experience fitting emotions, that fitting emotions are constituents of fitting happiness, (...)
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  3.  74
    Beyond Components of Wellbeing: The Effects of Relational and Situated Assemblage.Sarah Atkinson - 2013 - Topoi 32 (2):137-144.
    Despite multiple axes of variation in defining wellbeing, the paper argues for the dominance of a ‘components approach’ in current research and practice. This approach builds on a well-established tradition within the social sciences of attending to categories whether for their identification, their value or their meanings and political resonance. The paper critiques the components approach and explores how to move beyond it towards conceptually integrating the various categories and dimensions through a relational and situated account of wellbeing. (...)
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  4.  35
    Autonomy, Wellbeing, and the Case of the Refusing Patient.Jukka Varelius - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):117-125.
    A moral problem arises when a patient refuses a treatment that would save her life. Should the patient be treated against her will? According to an influential approach to questions of biomedical ethics, certain considerations pertaining to individual autonomy provide a solution to this problem. According to this approach, we should respect the patient’s autonomy and, since she has made an autonomous decision against accepting the treatment, she should not be treated. This article argues against the view that our answer (...)
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  5.  86
    The Anomalous Wellbeing of Disabled People: A Response.Claire Edwards - 2013 - Topoi 32 (2):189-196.
    Disabled people frequently find themselves in situations where their quality of life and wellbeing is being measured or judged by others, whether in decisions about health care provision or assessments for social supports. Recent debates about wellbeing and how it might be assessed (through subjective and/or objective measures) have prompted a renewed focus on disabled people’s wellbeing because of its seemingly ‘anomalous’ nature; that is, whilst to external (objective) observers the wellbeing of disabled people appears poor, (...)
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  6.  25
    Purebred Dogs and Canine Wellbeing.Sofia Jeppsson - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):417-430.
    Breeders of purebred dogs usually have several goals they want to accomplish, of which canine wellbeing is one. The purpose of this article is to investigate what we ought to do given this goal. Breeders typically think that they fulfil their wellbeing-related duties by doing the best they can within their breed of choice. However, it is true of most breeders that they could produce physically and mentally healthier dogs if they switched to a healthier breed. There are (...)
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  7.  86
    Children and Wellbeing.Anthony Skelton - 2018 - In Anca Gheaus, Gideon Calder & Jurgen De Wispelaere (eds.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Childhood and Children. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 90-100.
    Children are routinely treated paternalistically. There are good reasons for this. Children are quite vulnerable. They are ill-equipped to meet their most basic needs, due, in part, to deficiencies in practical and theoretical reasoning and in executing their wishes. Children’s motivations and perceptions are often not congruent with their best interests. Consequently, raising children involves facilitating their best interests synchronically and diachronically. In practice, this requires caregivers to (in some sense) manage a child’s daily life. If apposite, this management will (...)
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  8.  17
    The Wellbeing of Future Generations. Broome - 2016 - In The Oxford Handbook of Wellbeing and Public Policy. Oxford University Press. pp. 901–28.
    This chapter surveys some of the issues that arise in policy making when the wellbeing of future generations must be taken into account. It analyses the discounting of future wellbeing, and considers whether it is permissible. It argues that the effects of policy on the number of future people should not be ignored, and it considers what is an appropriate basis for setting a value on these effects. It considers the implications of the non-identity effect for intergenerational justice (...)
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  9.  34
    Saplings or Caterpillars? Trying to Understand Children's Wellbeing.Patrick Tomlin - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (S1):29-46.
    Is childhood valuable? And is childhood as, less, or more, valuable than adulthood? In this article I first delineate several different questions that we might be asking when we think about the ‘value of childhood’, and I explore some difficulties of doing so. I then focus on the question of whether childhood is good for the person who experiences it. I argue for two key claims. First, if childhood wellbeing is measured by the same standards as adulthood, then children (...)
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  10.  5
    Saplings or Caterpillars? Trying to Understand Children's Wellbeing.Patrick Tomlin - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (S1):29-46.
    Is childhood valuable? And is childhood as, less, or more, valuable than adulthood? In this article I first delineate several different questions that we might be asking when we think about the ‘value of childhood’, and I explore some difficulties of doing so. I then focus on the question of whether childhood is good for the person who experiences it. I argue for two key claims. First, if childhood wellbeing is measured by the same standards as adulthood, then children (...)
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  11.  39
    Epistemology and Wellbeing.Paul O'Grady - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 10 (1):97-116.
    There is a general presumption that epistemology does not have anything to do with wellbeing. In this paper I challenge these assumption, by examining the aftermath of the Gettier examples, the debate between internalism and externalism and the rise of virtue epistemology. In focusing on the epistemic agent as the locus of normativity, virtue epistemology allows one to ask questions about epistemic goods and their relationship to other kinds of good, including the good of the agent. Specifically it is (...)
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  12.  72
    Achievement, Wellbeing, and Value.Gwen Bradford - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (12):795-803.
    Achievement is among the central goods in life, but just what is achievement, and how is it valuable? There is reason to think that it is a constitutive part of wellbeing; yet, it is possible to sacrifice wellbeing for the sake of achievement. How might it have been worthwhile, if not in terms of wellbeing? Perhaps, achievement is an intrinsic good, or perhaps it is valuable in terms of meaning in life. This article considers various ways in (...)
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  13.  21
    Should Students Have to Borrow? Autonomy, Wellbeing and Student Debt.Christopher Martin - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):351-370.
    The orthodox view on higher education financing is that students should bear some of the costs of attending and, where necessary, meet that cost through debt financing. New economic realties, including protracted economic slowdown and increasing austerity of the state with respect to the public funding of goods and services has meant that the same generation who have to borrow the most in order to attend face significantly fewer employment prospects upon graduation. In this context, is the current approach of (...)
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  14.  5
    Wellbeing Research and Policy in the U.K.: Questionable Science Likely to Entrench Inequality.Leigh Price - 2017 - Journal of Critical Realism 16 (5):451-467.
    There are grave issues with how the U.K. government approaches the issue of wellbeing. Specifically, policy interventions that might improve the material conditions of citizens are being down-played, and at times out-rightly dismissed. Instead, an individualist, instrumental message is being promoted, namely, that the best way to improve wellbeing is by improving individual happiness and mental health. I argue that this instrumental message – which in practice blames the victims for their lack of happiness and removes state responsibility (...)
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  15. The Objectivity of Wellbeing.Matt Ferkany - 2012 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (4):472-492.
    Subjective theories of wellbeing place authority concerning what benefits a person with that person herself, or limit wellbeing to psychological states. But how well off we are seems to depend on two different concerns, how well we are doing and how well things are going for us. I argue that two powerful subjective theories fail to adequately account for this and that principled arguments favoring subjectivism are unsound and poorly motivated. In the absence of more compelling evidence that (...)
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  16.  61
    Why 'Nonexistent People' Do Not Have Zero Wellbeing but No Wellbeing at All.Ori J. Herstein - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):136-145.
    Some believe that the harm or benefit of existence is assessed by comparing a person's actual state of wellbeing with the level of wellbeing they would have had had they never existed. This approach relies on ascribing a state or level of wellbeing to ‘nonexistent people’, which seems a peculiar practice: how can we attribute wellbeing to a ‘nonexistent person'? To explain away this oddity, some have argued that because no properties of wellbeing can be (...)
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  17.  20
    Local Desire Satisfaction and Long Term Wellbeing: Revisiting the Gout Sufferer of Kant’s Groundwork.Alice Pinheiro Walla - 2015 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual.
    In this paper, I analyze the least discussed of Kant’s four examples of duty in the first section of his Groundwork to the Metaphysics of Morals: the gout sufferer who is no longer motivated by natural interest in his long-term wellbeing, and is thus in a unique position to secure his own happiness from duty. This example has long been wrongly interpreted as a failure of prudential rationality, as recently illustrated by Allen Wood’s reading of that example. -/- I (...)
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  18.  62
    'Love Law, Love Life': Neoliberalism, Wellbeing and Gender in the Legal Profession—The Case of Law School.Richard Collier - 2014 - Legal Ethics 17 (2):202-230.
    In recent years the issue of wellbeing has moved centre stage across jurisdictions within a wide range of debates relating to economic, cultural and political changes associated with neoliberalism. This is the backdrop against which the legal profession has itself begun to pay increasing attention to the issue of wellbeing in law. This article explores an aspect of this debate that has tended to be neglected thus far, namely the relationship between the neoliberal corporatisation of universities, gender and (...)
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  19. Wellbeing.Mark Vernon - 2008 - Routledge.
    The politics of wellbeing and the new science of happiness have shot up the agenda since Martin Seligman coined the phrase "positive psychology". After all, who does not want to live the good life? So ten years on, why is it that much of this otherwise welcome debate sounds like as much apple-pie - "work less", "earn enough", "keep fit", "find meaning", "enjoy freedoms"? The reason is not, ultimately, cynicism. Rather, it is because a central, tricky question is being (...)
     
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  20.  2
    Wellbeing and Education: Issues of Culture and Authority.John White - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (1):17-28.
    The idea that education should equip people to lead flourishing lives and help others to do so is now becoming salient in policy‐making circles. Philosophy of education can help here by clarifying what flourishing consists in. This essay examines one aspect of this. It rejects the view that wellbeing goods are derivable from human nature, as in the theories of Howard Gardner and Edmond Holmes. It locates them, rather, as cultural products, but not culturally‐relative ones, drawing attention to the (...)
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  21.  7
    From Food Security to Food Wellbeing: Examining Food Security Through the Lens of Food Wellbeing in Nepal’s Rapidly Changing Agrarian Landscape.Gartaula Hom, Patel Kirit, Johnson Derek, Devkota Rachana, Khadka Kamal & Chaudhary Pashupati - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (3):573-589.
    This paper argues that existing food security and food sovereignty approaches are inadequate to fully understand contradictory human development, nutrition, and productivity trends in Nepalese small-scale agriculture. In an attempt to bridge this gap, we developed a new food wellbeing approach that combines insights from food security, food sovereignty, and social wellbeing perspectives. We used the approach to frame 65 semi-structured interviews in a cluster of villages in Kaski district in the mid-hills of Nepal on various aspects of (...)
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  22.  59
    Wellbeing, Schizophrenia and Experience Machines.David Rhys Birks - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (2):81-88.
    In the USA and England and Wales, involuntary treatment for mental illness is subject to the constraint that it must be necessary for the health or safety of the patient, if he poses no danger to others. I will argue against this necessary condition of administering treatment and propose that the category of individuals eligible for involuntary treatment should be extended. I begin by focusing on the common disorder of schizophrenia and proceed to demonstrate that it can be a considerable (...)
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  23.  47
    Self-Determination, Wellbeing, and Threats of Harm.Antony Lamb - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):145–158.
    David Rodin argues that the right of national-defence as conceived in international law cannot be grounded in the end of defending the lives of individuals. Firstly, having this end is not necessary because there is a right of defence against an invasion that threatens no lives. However, in this context we are to understand that 'defending lives' includes defending against certain non-lethal threats. I will argue that threats to national-self determination and self-government are significant non-lethal threats to the wellbeing (...)
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  24.  17
    Commodified Science and Social Wellbeing.Angathevar Baskaran & Rebecca Boden - 2007 - AI and Society 21 (3):267-285.
    This paper explores the increasing trend towards the commodification of public research and development (R&D) and the impact of this on social wellbeing. In many developed countries, the changes introduced by governments to funding mechanisms for universities and public research institutions has led to a fundamental shift in the focus of public R&D. The focus has shifted from creating useful public, codifiable knowledge to creating a knowledge commodity driven by commercial imperatives. Although there may be an economic argument to (...)
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  25.  22
    Subjective Wellbeing in ASEAN: A Cross-Country Study.Tambyah Siok Kuan & Tan Soo Jiuan - 2011 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 12 (3):359-373.
    Our paper reports and discusses issues relating to subjective wellbeing in selected countries in ASEAN (The Association of Southeast Asian Nations), a regional organization that coordinates and promotes the economic, social and cultural interests of member countries in Southeast Asia. Comparisons will be made across the five founding members of ASEAN, namely Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand using data from the 2004, 2006 and 2007 AsiaBarometer Surveys. The indicators of subjective wellbeing used are perceptions of happiness, enjoyment, (...)
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  26.  15
    Duties of Minimal Wellbeing and Their Role in Global Justice.Ambrose Y. K. Lee - unknown
    This thesis is the first step in a research project which aims to develop an accurate and robust theory of global justice. The thesis concerns the content of our duties of global justice, under strict compliance theory. It begins by discussing the basic framework of my theory of global justice, which consists in two aspects: duties of minimal wellbeing, which are universal, and duties of fairness and equality, which are associative and not universal. With that in place, it briefly (...)
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  27.  5
    Subjective wellbeing publications in Chile.Fernando Farías Olavarría, Cristian Orellana Fonseca & Claudia Pérez - 2015 - Cinta de Moebio 54:240-249.
    This article aims to carry out an analysis of the publications about subjective wellbeing that have been developed in Chile. To reach such an objective, all the publications indexed in the main databases were gathered. The analysed variables were: type of research according to its thoroughness, epistemological stance, disciplinary areas of the researchers and characteristics of the journal. The data were analysed through univariate descriptive statistics and analysis of multiple correspondences. The main results indicate that the first publications start (...)
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  28.  4
    Wellbeing, Mindfulness and the Global Commons.Janet McIntyre-Mills - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (7-8):7-8.
    As the world becomes hotter and natural disasters increase, the challenge for survival will become greater. We need to become increasingly resilient. This has implications for how we see ourselves, others and the environment. What is consciousness? If it is more than the firing of an assemblage of neurons in our brain , how does it relate to mindfulness? What is the link between mindfulness, wellbeing and the global commons? Where do we -- indeed should we -- draw the (...)
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  29.  2
    Maori Wellbeing and Being-in-the-World: Challenging Notions for Psychological Research and Practice in New Zealand.Gabriel Rossouw - 2008 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (2):1-11.
    Psychological research and practice in New Zealand has a long history of a positivist inspired epistemology and a pragmatic evidence-based approach to therapeutic treatment. There is a growing realization that a more meaningful interface between research and practice is required to accommodate indigenous Maori knowledge of wellbeing and living. The dominant Western psychological view in New Zealand of world, time, illness and wellbeing results in practices that do not make sense in cultural terms. The medicalisation and classification of (...)
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  30. The "One in the Morning" Knock : Exploring the Connections Between Faith, Participation and Wellbeing.Christopher Baker - 2010 - In John R. Atherton, Elaine L. Graham & Ian Steedman (eds.), The Practices of Happiness: Political Economy, Religion and Wellbeing. Routledge.
     
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  31. Institutions, Organisations and Wellbeing.Tony Berry - 2010 - In John R. Atherton, Elaine L. Graham & Ian Steedman (eds.), The Practices of Happiness: Political Economy, Religion and Wellbeing. Routledge.
     
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  32. Finding Care for the Caregiver? Active Participation in Online Health Forums Attenuates the Negative Effect of Caregiver Strain on Wellbeing.Marieke Fortgens-Sillmann, Enny Das & Martin Tanis - 2011 - Communications 36 (1):51-66.
    This paper focuses on how online health forums may benefit the wellbeing of caregivers. An online questionnaire of caregivers assessed caregiver strain, forum use, and mental and physical wellbeing. Results show a positive relation between caregiver strain and using online health forums to seek emotional support. Furthermore, we find that caregivers with higher levels of caregiver strain report lower mental and physical wellbeing. This relation is however moderated by using online health forums. While the amount of time (...)
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  33. Health and Wellbeing in Childhood.Garvis Susanne & Pendergast Donna (eds.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    The period from birth to twelve years is crucial in a child's development and can significantly impact future educational success, resilience and participation in society. Health and Wellbeing in Childhood, 2nd edition provides readers with a comprehensive foundation in health and wellbeing education across key priority areas, covering physical, social and emotional learning and development. This edition has been thoroughly updated to include the latest research and resources and incorporates expanded material on diversity, mental health and contemplative practice. (...)
     
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  34. Happiness Through Thrift : The Contribution of Business to Human Wellbeing.Peter Heslam - 2010 - In John R. Atherton, Elaine L. Graham & Ian Steedman (eds.), The Practices of Happiness: Political Economy, Religion and Wellbeing. Routledge.
     
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  35. Crime, Wellbeing and Society : Reflections on Social, 'Anti-Social' and 'Restorative' Capital.Christopher Jones - 2010 - In John R. Atherton, Elaine L. Graham & Ian Steedman (eds.), The Practices of Happiness: Political Economy, Religion and Wellbeing. Routledge.
  36. Fair Trade and Human Wellbeing.Michael Northcott - 2010 - In John R. Atherton, Elaine L. Graham & Ian Steedman (eds.), The Practices of Happiness: Political Economy, Religion and Wellbeing. Routledge.
     
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  37. Wellbeing.Mark Vernon - 2008 - Routledge.
    The politics of wellbeing and the new science of happiness have shot up the agenda since Martin Seligman coined the phrase "positive psychology". After all, who does not want to live the good life? So ten years on, why is it that much of this otherwise welcome debate sounds like as much apple-pie - "work less", "earn enough", "keep fit", "find meaning", "enjoy freedoms"? The reason is not, ultimately, cynicism. Rather, it is because a central, tricky question is being (...)
     
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  38.  11
    Ingrid Robeyns, Wellbeing, Freedom and Social Justice: The Capability Approach Re-Examined.Jessica Begon - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):135-139.
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  39.  2
    Enhancing Health and Wellbeing Through Immersion in Nature: A Conceptual Perspective Combining the Stoic and Buddhist Traditions.Fabjański Marcin & Brymer Eric - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  40.  6
    Ethics, Knowledge, and a Procedural Approach to Wellbeing.Søren Harnow Klausen - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
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  41.  5
    Milena Buchs and Max Koch, Postgrowth and Wellbeing: Challenges to Sustainable Welfare.Rachel Manning - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):713-715.
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  42.  5
    Exposing the “Wellbeing Gap” Between American Men and Women: Revelations From the Sociology of Emotion Surveys.R. Patulny - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (2):169-174.
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  43. Wellbeing and Education: Issues of Culture and Authority.John White - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (1):17–28.
    The idea that education should equip people to lead flourishing lives and help others to do so is now becoming salient in policy-making circles. Philosophy of education can help here by clarifying what flourishing consists in. This essay examines one aspect of this. It rejects the view that well-being goods are derivable from human nature, as in the theories of Howard Gardner and Edmond Holmes. It locates them, rather, as cultural products, but not culturally-relative ones, drawing attention to the proliferating (...)
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  44.  5
    Beyond Exposure to Outdoor Nature: Exploration of the Benefits of a Green Building’s Indoor Environment on Wellbeing.Bianca C. Dreyer, Simon Coulombe, Stephanie Whitney, Manuel Riemer & Delphine Labbé - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  45.  52
    Intelligence, Wellbeing and Procreative Beneficence.J. Adam Carter & Emma C. Gordon - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):122-135.
    If Savulescu's (2001, 2009) controversial principle of Procreative Beneficence (PB) is correct, then an important implication is that couples should employ genetic tests for non-disease traits in selecting which child to bring into existence. Both defenders as well as some critics of this normative entailment of PB have typically accepted the comparatively less controversial claim about non-disease traits: that there are non-disease traits such that testing and selecting for them would in fact contribute to bringing about the child who is (...)
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  46.  4
    Robeyns, Ingrid. Wellbeing, Freedom and Social Justice: The Capability Approach Re-Examined. Cambridge: Open Book, 2017. Pp. 268. $41.23 ; $22.87. [REVIEW]Jessica Begon - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):135-139.
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  47.  2
    Positive Psychological Wellbeing Is Required for Online Self-Help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain to Be Effective.Hester R. Trompetter, Ernst T. Bohlmeijer, Sanne M. A. Lamers & Karlein M. G. Schreurs - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  48. Political Wellbeing in Biblical Perspective.W. Moberly - 1990 - Studies in Christian Ethics 3 (1):14-29.
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  49.  4
    The Wellbeing of Italian Peacekeeper Military: Psychological Resources, Quality of Life and Internalizing Symptoms.Yura Loscalzo, Marco Giannini, Alessio Gori & Annamaria Di Fabio - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  50.  2
    Resounding Meaning: A PERMA Wellbeing Profile of Classical Musicians.Sara Ascenso, Rosie Perkins & Aaron Williamon - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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