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Wendell Clausen [22]Wendell Vernon Clausen [3]
  1.  5
    An interpolated verse in Horace.Wendell Clausen - 1962 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 106 (1-2):205-206.
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  2.  13
    Crater Cratera Creterra.Wendell Clausen - 1963 - Classical Quarterly 13 (01):85-.
    The article on crater cratera creterra in T.L.L. iv. 1108–10 is imperfect: several examples are omitted and no clear and coherent account of these forms is given. crater appears first in Ennius' Annales ; and very likely it was Ennius who, finding cratera too ordinary for poetry, transliterated . For several centuries crater remained a poets' word. It may have been introduced into prose by the elder Pliny, who affects poetic vocabulary; in later prose it is found more frequently than (...)
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  3.  2
    Cato, D e agri cult. 14, 5.Wendell Clausen - 1966 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 110 (1-2):306-307.
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  4.  4
    Statius, thebaid, 10, 299.Wendell Clausen - 1967 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 111 (1-2):146-146.
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  5.  21
    Three Notes on Lucretius.Wendell Clausen - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (02):544-.
    To Munro's conjecture, which has been accepted by Diels , S. B. Smith , Bailey , Büchner , Martin , and M. F. Smith , there is a serious, possibly a fatal, objection: the genitive plural of hiems is a grammarians' figment and never occurs in classical Latin ; while Lachmann's conjecture is palaeographically improbable. Read ad gelidas rigidasque pruinas; rigidas was omitted by haplography, a fecund source of corruption, and hiemis then supplied from the context to repair the metre. (...)
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  6.  27
    Two Notes on Juvenal.Wendell Clausen - 1951 - The Classical Review 1 (02):73-74.
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  7.  16
    Sophocles Trachiniae 419.P. T. Eden, A. Rijksbaron, W. M. Clarke, Martin Korenjak, Wendell Clausen, Ingrid A. R. De Smet, Oleg V. Bychkov & Michael Hendry - 1995 - Mnemosyne 48 (4):197-211.
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  8.  2
    The Cambridge History of Classical Literature: Volume 2, Latin Literature, Part 4, the Early Principate.E. J. Kenney & Wendell Vernon Clausen (eds.) - 1983 - Cambridge University Press.
    'Perfection is finality; finality is death'. The poets and prose writers of the first and early second centuries AD were not deterred by the towering stature of their Augustan predecessors from attempting new and often brilliant variations on the now traditional themes and genres. The so-called 'Silver' Age of Latin literature has tended to be characterized in terms of dismissive or question- begging stereotypes - 'decadent', 'rhetorical', 'baroque', 'mannerist' - as a substitute for close critical argument. From the sympathetic but (...)
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  9.  4
    The Cambridge History of Classical Literature: Volume 2, Latin Literature, Part 3, the Age of Augustus.E. J. Kenney & Wendell Vernon Clausen (eds.) - 1983 - Cambridge University Press.
    The sixty years between 43 BC, when Cicero was assassinated, and AD 17, when Ovid died in exile and disgrace, saw an unexampled explosion of literary creativity in Rome. Fresh ground was broken in almost every existing genre, and a new kind of specifically Roman poetry, the personal love-elegy, was born, flourished, and succumbed to its own success. Latin literature now became, in the familiar modern sense of the word, classical: a balanced fusion of what was best and most stimulating (...)
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  10.  2
    The Cambridge History of Classical Literature: Volume 2, Latin Literature, Part 2, the Late Republic.E. J. Kenney & Wendell Vernon Clausen (eds.) - 1983 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume covers a relatively short span of time, rather less than the first three-quarters of the first century BC; but it was an age of profoundly important developments, with enduring consequences for the subsequent history of Latin literature. Original and innovative in widely differing ways as was the work of Lucretius, Sallust and Caesar in particular, the scene is dominated, historically, by two figures: Cicero and Catullus. Cicero was a politician and a man of affairs as well as a (...)
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