11 found
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  1.  30
    After the DNR: Surrogates Who Persist in Requesting Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.Ellen M. Robinson, Wendy Cadge, Angelika A. Zollfrank, M. Cornelia Cremens & Andrew M. Courtwright - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (1):10-19.
    Some health care organizations allow physicians to withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation from a patient, despite patient or surrogate requests that it be provided, when they believe it will be more harmful than beneficial. Such cases usually involve patients with terminal diagnoses whose medical teams argue that aggressive treatments are medically inappropriate or likely to be harmful. Although there is state-to-state variability and a considerable judicial gray area about the conditions and mechanisms for refusals to perform CPR, medical teams typically follow a (...)
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  2.  30
    The role of religious beliefs in ethics committee consultations for conflict over life-sustaining treatment.Julia I. Bandini, Andrew Courtwright, Angelika A. Zollfrank, Ellen M. Robinson & Wendy Cadge - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (6):353-358.
    Previous research has suggested that individuals who identify as being more religious request more aggressive medical treatment at end of life. These requests may generate disagreement over life-sustaining treatment (LST). Outside of anecdotal observation, however, the actual role of religion in conflict over LST has been underexplored. Because ethics committees are often consulted to help mediate these conflicts, the ethics consultation experience provides a unique context in which to investigate this question. The purpose of this paper was to examine the (...)
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  3.  20
    Strategies of emotion management: not just on, but off the job.Clare Hammonds & Wendy Cadge - 2014 - Nursing Inquiry 21 (2):162-170.
    Intensive care nurses, like professionals in other intense occupations characterized by high degrees of uncertainty, manage the emotions that result from their work both on and off the job. We focus on the job strategies – calling‐in, sharing their experiences with others and engaging in a range of activities oriented to emotional recovery – that 37 intensive care nurses use to manage their emotions off the job. These strategies show how the social organization and division of labor in intensive care (...)
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  4.  21
    Experiences of moral distress in a COVID‐19 intensive care unit: A qualitative study of nurses and respiratory therapists in the United States.Sophie Trachtenberg, Tara Tehan, Sara Shostak, Colleen Snydeman, Mariah Lewis, Frederic Romain, Wendy Cadge, Mary Elizabeth McAuley, Cristina Matthews, Laura Lux, Robert Kacmarek, Katelyn Grone, Vivian Donahue, Julia Bandini & Ellen Robinson - 2023 - Nursing Inquiry 30 (1):e12500.
    The COVID‐19 pandemic has placed extraordinary stress on frontline healthcare providers as they encounter significant challenges and risks while caring for patients at the bedside. This study used qualitative research methods to explore nurses and respiratory therapists' experiences providing direct care to COVID‐19 patients during the first surge of the pandemic at a large academic medical center in the Northeastern United States. The purpose of this study was to explore their experiences as related to changes in staffing models and to (...)
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  5.  5
    Where are you organizationally situated? Views from here.Becky Barton & Wendy Cadge - 2016 - Critical Research on Religion 4 (3):279-285.
    We reflect personally and historically on some of the institutions that have nurtured and shaped conversations at the intersections of sociology and religious studies, particularly professional associations. Our argument is simple. The ways different scholars understand the relationship between the sociology of religion and religious studies have a lot to do with the institutions that nurtured us and through which we engage in the conversation. We push back on simple black and white distinctions that paint their approaches in oppositions: more (...)
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  6.  19
    Franklin G. Miller works in the De.Nancy Berlinger & Wendy Cadge - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  7.  2
    Gendered Religious Organizations: The Case of Theravada Buddhism in America.Wendy Cadge - 2004 - Gender and Society 18 (6):777-793.
    This article examines how organizational context shapes the way gender is socially constructed in two non-Judeo-Christian religious organizations in the United States, one Theravada Buddhist organization founded by immigrants and one started by converts. People at the two organizations disagree with each other about what Theravada Buddhism teaches about women in teaching and leadership positions but agree that outside of these positions, women and men are equally able to gain access to and practice the tradition. Despite these understandings, women and (...)
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  8.  27
    Lost in Translation: The Chaplain's Role in Health Care.Raymond de Vries, Nancy Berlinger & Wendy Cadge - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (6):23-27.
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  9. Lost in Translation? Sociological Observations and Reflections on the Practice of Hospital Chaplaincy.Raymond De Vries, Nancy Berlinger & Wendy Cadge - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
     
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  10.  17
    Lost in translation: The chaplain's role in health care.Raymond Vries, Nancy Berlinger & Wendy Cadge - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (6):23-27.
    Chaplains often describe their work in health care as “translation” between the world of the patient and the world of hospital medicine. Translators usually work with texts, interpreters with words. However, when chaplains use this metaphor, it describes something other than a discrete task associated with the meaning of words. While medical professionals focus on patients' medical conditions, chaplains seek to read the whole person, asking questions about what people's lives are like outside of the hospital, what they care about (...)
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  11.  6
    Structure, Operation, and Experience of Clinical Ethics Consultation 2007-2013: A Report from the Massachusetts General Hospital Optimum Care Committee. [REVIEW]Andrew M. Courtwright, Eric L. Krakauer, M. Cornelia Cremens, Alexandra Cist, Julia Bandini, Sharon Brackett, Kimberly Erler, Wendy Cadge & Ellen M. Robinson - 2017 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 28 (2):137-152.
    We describe the structure, operation, and experience of the Massachusetts General Hospital ethics committee, formally called the Edwin H. Cassem Optimum Care Committee, from January 2007 through December 2013. Founded in 1974 as one of the nation’s first hospital ethics committees, this committee has primarily focused on the optimum use of life-sustaining treatments. We outline specific sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of consult patients during this period, demographic differences between the adult inpatient population and patients for whom the ethics committee was (...)
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