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Wendy Lipworth [58]Wendy L. Lipworth [1]
  1. An Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research.Vicki Xafis, G. Owen Schaefer, Markus K. Labude, Iain Brassington, Angela Ballantyne, Hannah Yeefen Lim, Wendy Lipworth, Tamra Lysaght, Cameron Stewart, Shirley Sun, Graeme T. Laurie & E. Shyong Tai - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (3):227-254.
    Ethical decision-making frameworks assist in identifying the issues at stake in a particular setting and thinking through, in a methodical manner, the ethical issues that require consideration as well as the values that need to be considered and promoted. Decisions made about the use, sharing, and re-use of big data are complex and laden with values. This paper sets out an Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research developed by a working group convened by the Science, Health and (...)
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  2.  4
    Real-World Data to Generate Evidence About Healthcare Interventions: The Application of an Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research.Wendy Lipworth - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (3):289-298.
    It is increasingly recognised that evidence generated using “real-world data” is crucial for assessing the safety and effectiveness of health-related interventions. This, however, raises a number of issues, including those related to the quality of RWD, and of the scientific methods used to generate evidence from it, and the potential for those gathering and using RWD be driven by commercial, political, professional or personal self-interest. This article is an application of the framework presented in this issue of ABR. Please refer (...)
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  3.  14
    Clarifying the Relationship Between Serious Ethical Violations and Conflicts of Interest.Ian Kerridge, Narcyz Ghinea & Wendy Lipworth - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (1):48-50.
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  4.  70
    Ethics and Epistemology in Big Data Research.Wendy Lipworth, Paul H. Mason, Ian Kerridge & John P. A. Ioannidis - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):489-500.
    Biomedical innovation and translation are increasingly emphasizing research using “big data.” The hope is that big data methods will both speed up research and make its results more applicable to “real-world” patients and health services. While big data research has been embraced by scientists, politicians, industry, and the public, numerous ethical, organizational, and technical/methodological concerns have also been raised. With respect to technical and methodological concerns, there is a view that these will be resolved through sophisticated information technologies, predictive algorithms, (...)
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  5.  10
    Against the Use and Publication of Contemporary Unethical Research: The Case of Chinese Transplant Research.Wendy C. Higgins, Wendy A. Rogers, Angela Ballantyne & Wendy Lipworth - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (10):678-684.
    Recent calls for retraction of a large body of Chinese transplant research and of Dr Jiankui He’s gene editing research has led to renewed interest in the question of publication, retraction and use of unethical biomedical research. In Part 1 of this paper, we briefly review the now well-established consequentialist and deontological arguments for and against the use of unethical research. We argue that, while there are potentially compelling justifications for use under some circumstances, these justifications fail when unethical practices (...)
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  6.  7
    Dangers of Neglecting Non-Financial Conflicts of Interest in Health and Medicine.Miriam Wiersma, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (5):319-322.
    Non-financial interests, and the conflicts of interest that may result from them, are frequently overlooked in biomedicine. This is partly due to the complex and varied nature of these interests, and the limited evidence available regarding their prevalence and impact on biomedical research and clinical practice. We suggest that there are no meaningful conceptual distinctions, and few practical differences, between financial and non-financial conflicts of interest, and accordingly, that both require careful consideration. Further, a better understanding of the complexities of (...)
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  7.  76
    Ethics and Epistemology of Big Data.Ian Kerridge, Paul Mason & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):485-488.
    In this Symposium on the Ethics and Epistemology of Big Data, we present four perspectives on the ways in which the rapid growth in size of research databanks—i.e. their shift into the realm of “big data”—has changed their moral, socio-political, and epistemic status. While there is clearly something different about “big data” databanks, we encourage readers to place the arguments presented in this Symposium in the context of longstanding debates about the ethics, politics, and epistemology of biobank, database, genetic, and (...)
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  8.  32
    Values‐Based Medicine and Modest Foundationalism.Miles Little, Wendy Lipworth, Jill Gordon, Pippa Markham & Ian Kerridge - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1020-1026.
  9.  19
    Debates About Conflict of Interest in Medicine: Deconstructing a Divided Discourse.Serena Purdy, Miles Little, Christopher Mayes & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):135-149.
    The pharmaceutical industry plays an increasingly dominant role in healthcare, raising concerns about “conflicts of interest” on the part of the medical professionals who interact with the industry. However, there is considerable disagreement over the extent to which COI is a problem and how it should be managed. Participants in debates about COI have become entrenched in their views, which is both unproductive and deeply confusing for the majority of medical professionals trying to work in an increasingly commercialized environment. We (...)
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  10.  37
    The Political and Ethical Challenge of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis.Ross Upshur, Ian Kerridge, Wendy Lipworth, Christopher Mayes & Chris Degeling - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (1):107-113.
    This article critically examines current responses to multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and argues that bioethics needs to be willing to engage in a more radical critique of the problem than is currently offered. In particular, we need to focus not simply on market-driven models of innovation and anti-microbial solutions to emergent and re-emergent infections such as TB. The global community also needs to address poverty and the structural factors that entrench inequalities—thus moving beyond the orthodox medical/public health frame of reference.
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  11.  13
    Scientism, Conflicts of Interest, and the Marginalization of Ethics in Medical Education.Christopher Mayes, Jane Williams, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):939-944.
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  12.  11
    Status, Respect, and Stigma: A Qualitative Study of Non-financial Interests in Medicine.Miriam Wiersma, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (2):203-216.
    Conflicts of interest in health and medicine have been the source of considerable public and professional debate. Much of this debate has focused on financial, rather than non-financial COI, which is a significant lacuna because non-financial COI can be just as influential as financial COI. In an effort to explore the nature and effects of non-financial, as well as financial COI, we conducted semi-structured interviews with eleven Australian medical professionals regarding their experiences of, and attitudes towards, COI. We found that (...)
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  13.  10
    Ethics and Epistemology of Big Data.Ian Kerridge, Paul Mason & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):485-488.
    In this Symposium on the Ethics and Epistemology of Big Data, we present four perspectives on the ways in which the rapid growth in size of research databanks—i.e. their shift into the realm of “big data”—has changed their moral, socio-political, and epistemic status. While there is clearly something different about “big data” databanks, we encourage readers to place the arguments presented in this Symposium in the context of longstanding debates about the ethics, politics, and epistemology of biobank, database, genetic, and (...)
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  14.  20
    Overcoming Entrenched Disagreements: The Case of Misoprostol for Post‐Partum Haemorrhage.Narcyz Ghinea, Wendy Lipworth, Miles Little, Ian Kerridge & Richard Day - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (1):48-54.
    The debate about whether misoprostol should be distributed to low resource communities to prevent post-partum haemorrhage, recognised as a major cause of maternal mortality, is deeply polarised. This is in spite of stakeholders having access to the same evidence about the risks and benefits of misoprostol. To understand the disagreement, we conducted a qualitative analysis of the values underpinning debates surrounding community distribution of misoprostol. We found that different moral priorities, epistemic values, and attitudes towards uncertainty were the main factors (...)
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  15.  5
    Symposium Lead Essay—Conflict of Interest: Opening Up New Territories.Miriam Wiersma, Wendy Lipworth, Paul Komesaroff & Ian Kerridge - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (2):169-172.
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  16.  36
    On the Fragility of Medical Virtue in a Neoliberal Context: The Case of Commercial Conflicts of Interest in Reproductive Medicine.Christopher Mayes, Brette Blakely, Ian Kerridge, Paul Komesaroff, Ian Olver & Wendy Lipworth - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (1):97-111.
    Social, political, and economic environments play an active role in nurturing professional virtue. Yet, these environments can also lead to the erosion of virtue. As such, professional virtue is fragile and vulnerable to environmental shifts. While physicians are often considered to be among the most virtuous of professional groups, concern has also always existed about the impact of commercial arrangements on physicians’ willingness and capacity to enact their professional virtues. This article examines the ways in which commercial arrangements have been (...)
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  17.  4
    Beyond Flourishing: Intersecting Uses and Interests in the Neurotechnology Marketplace.Cynthia Forlini, Wendy Lipworth, Adrian Carter & Ian Kerridge - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (4):178-180.
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  18.  22
    Declarations, Accusations and Judgement: Examining Conflict of Interest Discourses as Performative Speech-Acts.Christopher Mayes, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (3):455-462.
    Concerns over conflicts of interest in academic research and medical practice continue to provoke a great deal of discussion. What is most obvious in this discourse is that when COIs are declared, or perceived to exist in others, there is a focus on both the descriptive question of whether there is a COI and, subsequently, the normative question of whether it is good, bad or neutral. We contend, however, that in addition to the descriptive and normative, COI declarations and accusations (...)
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  19.  22
    Towards a Bioethics of Innovation.Wendy Lipworth & Renata Axler - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (7):445-449.
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  20.  20
    More Than One Way to Be Global: Globalization of Research and the Contest of Ideas.Paul H. Mason, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (10):48-49.
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  21.  16
    Meaning and Value in Medical School Curricula.Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Miles Little, Jill Gordon & Pippa Markham - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1027-1035.
    Rationale, aims and objectives: Bioethics and professionalism are standard subjects in medical training programmes, and these curricula reflect particular representations of meaning and practice. It is important that these curricula cohere with the actual concerns of practicing clinicians so that students are prepared for real-world practice. We aimed to identify ethical and professional concerns that do not appear to be adequately addressed in standard curricula by comparing ethics curricula with themes that emerged from a qualitative study of medical practitioners. Method: (...)
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  22.  4
    Does Consumer Engagement in Health Technology Assessment Enhance or Undermine Equity?Narcyz Ghinea, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (1):87-94.
    Consumer engagement in decisions about the funding of medicines is often framed as a good in and of itself and as an activity that should be universally encouraged. A common justification for calls for consumer engagement is that it enhances equity. In this paper we systematically critique this assumption. We show that consumer engagement may undermine equity as well as enhance it and show that a simple relationship cannot be assumed but must be justified and demonstrated. In concluding, we present (...)
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  23.  3
    Formulating an Ethics of Pharmaceutical Disinvestment.Jessica Pace, Tracey-Lea Laba, Marie-Paul Nisingizwe & Wendy Lipworth - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (1):75-86.
    There is growing interest among pharmaceutical policymakers in how to “disinvest” from subsidized medicines. This is due to both the rapidly rising costs of healthcare and the increasing use of accelerated and conditional reimbursement pathways which mean that medicines are being subsidized on the basis of less robust evidence of safety and efficacy. It is crucial that disinvestment decisions are morally sound and socially legitimate, but there is currently no framework to facilitate this. We therefore reviewed the bioethics literature in (...)
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  24.  3
    Lead Essay: Money, Equity and Access to Medicines.Narcyz Ghinea, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (1):25-27.
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  25.  29
    Deriving and Critiquing an Empirically Based Framework for Pharmaceutical Ethics.Wendy Lipworth & Miles Little - 2014 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 5 (1):23-32.
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  26.  28
    Evidence‐Based Medicine and Epistemological Imperialism: Narrowing the Divide Between Evidence and Illness.Helen Crowther, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):868-872.
    Evidence-based medicine has been rapidly and widely adopted because it claims to provide a method for determining the safety and efficacy of medical therapies and public health interventions more generally. However, as others have noted, EBM may be riven through with cultural bias, both in the generation of evidence and in its translation. We suggest that technological and scientific advances in medicine accentuate and entrench these cultural biases, to the extent that they may invalidate the evidence we have about disease (...)
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  27.  21
    Medicine, the Media and Political Interests.Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Bronwen Morrell, Catriona Bonfiglioli & Rowena Forsyth - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (12):768-770.
    The news media is frequently criticised for failing to support the goals of government health campaigns. But is this necessarily the purpose of the media? We suggest that while the media has an important role in disseminating health messages, it is a mistake to assume that the media should serve the interests of government as it has its own professional ethics, norms, values, structures and roles that extend well beyond the interests of the health sector, and certainly beyond those of (...)
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  28.  7
    The Need for Beneficence and Prudence in Clinical Innovation with Autologous Stem Cells.Wendy Lipworth, Cameron Stewart & Ian Kerridge - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 61 (1):90-105.
    In recent years, there has been a rapid growth in the use of autologous stem cell-based interventions to treat a wide range of medical conditions, including those for which there is limited evidence of safety and efficacy. One justification for this growth in the use of unproven interventions is that clinicians should be free to innovate, as long as consumers are adequately informed about risks and benefits. In this essay, we systematically refute the strong claim that consumer and clinician autonomy (...)
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  29.  21
    Widening the Debate About Conflict of Interest: Addressing Relationships Between Journalists and the Pharmaceutical Industry.Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Melissa Sweet, Christopher Jordens, Catriona Bonfiglioli & Rowena Forsyth - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):492-495.
    The phone-hacking scandal that led to the closure of the News of the World newspaper in Britain has prompted international debate about media practices and regulation. It is timely to broaden the discussion about journalistic ethics and conduct to include consideration of the impact of media practices upon the population's health. Many commercial organisations cultivate relationships with journalists and news organisations with the aim of influencing the content of health-related news and information communicated through the media. Given the significant influence (...)
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  30.  27
    Access to High Cost Cancer Medicines Through the Lens of an Australian Senate Inquiry—Defining the “Goods” at Stake.Narcyz Ghinea, Miles Little & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):401-410.
    Cancer is a major burden on populations and health systems internationally. The development of innovative cancer medicines is seen as a significant part of the solution. These new cancer medicines are, however, expensive, leading to limited or delayed access and disagreements among stakeholders about which medicines to fund. There is no obvious resolution to these disagreements, with stakeholders holding firmly to divergent positions. Access to cancer medicines was recently explored in Australia in a Senate Inquiry into the Availability of New, (...)
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  31.  11
    Evidence, Regulation and ‘Rational’ Prescribing: The Case of Gabapentin for Neuropathic Pain.Narcyz Ghinea, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (1):28-33.
  32.  21
    Health Professionals “Make Their Choice”: Pharmaceutical Industry Leaders’ Understandings of Conflict of Interest.Quinn Grundy, Lisa Tierney, Christopher Mayes & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):541-553.
    Conflicts of interest, stemming from relationships between health professionals and the pharmaceutical industry, remain a highly divisive and inflammatory issue in healthcare. Given that most jurisdictions rely on industry to self-regulate with respect to its interactions with health professionals, it is surprising that little research has explored industry leaders’ understandings of conflicts of interest. Drawing from in-depth interviews with ten pharmaceutical industry leaders based in Australia, we explore the normalized and structural management of conflicts of interest within pharmaceutical companies. We (...)
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  33.  9
    Consent to Biobank Research: Facing Up to the Challenge of Globalization.Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (9):58-59.
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  34.  69
    The “EBM Movement”: Where Did It Come From, Where is It Going, and Why Does It Matter?Ian Kerridge, Stacy M. Carter & Wendy Lipworth - 2008 - Social Epistemology 22 (4):425-431.
    Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) has now been part of the dominant medical paradigm for 15 years, and has been frequently debated and progressively modified. One question about EBM that has not yet been considered systematically, and is now particularly timely, is the question of the novelty, or otherwise, of the principles and practices of EBM. We argue that answering this question, and the related question of whether EBM-type principles and practices are unique to medicine, sheds new light on EBM and has (...)
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  35.  13
    Ethics & Evidence in Medical Debates: The Case of Recombinant Activated Factor VII.Narcyz Ghinea, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Miles Little & Richard O. Day - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (2):38-45.
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  36.  13
    Globalisation and the Ethics of Transnational Biobank Networks.Lisa Dive, Paul Mason, Edwina Light, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Asian Bioethics Review 9 (4):301-310.
    Biobanks are increasingly being linked together into global networks in order to maximise their capacity to identify causes of and treatments for disease. While there is great optimism about the potential of these biobank networks to contribute to personalised and data-driven medicine, there are also ethical concerns about, among other things, risks to personal privacy and exploitation of vulnerable populations. Concepts drawn from theories of globalisation can assist with the characterisation of the ethical implications of biobank networking across borders, which (...)
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  37.  21
    Doctors on Status and Respect: A Qualitative Study. [REVIEW]Wendy Lipworth, Miles Little, Pippa Markham, Jill Gordon & Ian Kerridge - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):205-217.
    While doctors generally enjoy considerable status, some believe that this is increasingly threatened by consumerism, managerialism, and competition from other health professions. Research into doctors’ perceptions of the changes occurring in medicine has provided some insights into how they perceive and respond to these changes but has generally failed to distinguish clearly between concerns about “status,” related to the entitlements associated with one’s position in a social hierarchy, and concerns about “respect,” related to being held in high regard for one’s (...)
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  38.  10
    The Deadly Business of an Unregulated Global Stem Cell Industry.Tamra Lysaght, Wendy Lipworth, Tereza Hendl, Ian Kerridge, Tsung-Ling Lee, Megan Munsie, Catherine Waldby & Cameron Stewart - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (11):744-746.
    In 2016, the Office of the State Coroner of New South Wales released its report into the death of an Australian woman, Sheila Drysdale, who had died from complications of an autologous stem cell procedure at a Sydney clinic. In this report, we argue that Mrs Drysdale's death was avoidable, and it was the result of a pernicious global problem of an industry exploiting regulatory systems to sell unproven and unjustified interventions with stem cells.
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  39.  4
    The Medical Innovation Bill: Still More Harm Than Good.Bernadette Richards, Gerard Porter, Wendy Lipworth & Tamra Lysaght - 2015 - Clinical Ethics 10 (1-2):1-4.
    The Medical Innovation Bill continues its journey through Parliament. On 23 January 2015, it was debated for the final time in the House of Lords and with one final amendment, the House moved to support the Bill, which then moved to the House of Commons on 26 January. It will be debated again on 27 February 2015. The Bill’s purpose is to encourage responsible innovation in medical treatment. Although this goal is laudable, it is argued that the Bill is unnecessary (...)
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  40.  36
    The Epistemology and Ethics of Journal Reviewing: A Second Look. [REVIEW]Paul A. Komesaroff, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (1):3-6.
  41.  24
    Health Journalists' Perceptions of Their Professional Roles and Responsibilities for Ensuring the Veracity of Reports of Health Research.Rowena Forsyth, Bronwen Morrell, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Simon Chapman - 2012 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (2):130 - 141.
    Health industries attempt to influence the public through the news media and through their relationships with expert academics and opinion leaders. This study reports journalists' perceptions of their professional roles and responsibilities regarding the relationships between industry and academia and research results. Journalists believe that responsibility for the scientific validity of their reports rests with academics and systems of peer review. However, this approach fails to account for the extent of industry-academy interactions and the flaws of peer review. Health journalists' (...)
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  42.  29
    Should Biomedical Publishing Be “Opened Up”? Toward a Values-Based Peer-Review Process.Wendy Lipworth, Ian H. Kerridge, Stacy M. Carter & Miles Little - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (3):267-280.
    Peer review of manuscripts for biomedical journals has become a subject of intense ethical debate. One of the most contentious issues is whether or not peer review should be anonymous. This study aimed to generate a rich, empirically-grounded understanding of the values held by journal editors and peer reviewers with a view to informing journal policy. Qualitative methods were used to carry out an inductive analysis of biomedical reviewers’ and editors’ values. Data was derived from in-depth, open-ended interviews with journal (...)
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  43.  33
    Generating a Taxonomy of Regulatory Responses to Emerging Issues in Biomedicine.Wendy Lipworth - 2005 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (3):130-141.
    In the biomedical field, calls for the generation of new regulations or for the amendment of existing regulations often follow the emergence of apparently new research practices (such as embryonic stem cell research), clinical practices (such as facial transplantation) and entities (such as Avian Influenza/’Bird Flu’). Calls for regulatory responses also arise as a result of controversies which bring to light longstanding practices, such as the call for increased regulation of human tissue collections that followed the discovery of unauthorised post-mortem (...)
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  44.  21
    How Pharmaceutical Industry Employees Manage Competing Commitments in the Face of Public Criticism.Wendy Lipworth, Kathleen Montgomery & Miles Little - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):355-367.
    The pharmaceutical industry has been criticised for pervasive misconduct. These concerns have generally resulted in increasing regulation. While such regulation is no doubt necessary, it tends to assume that everyone working for pharmaceutical companies is equally motivated by commerce, without much understanding of the specific views and experiences of those who work in different parts of the industry. In order to gain a more nuanced picture of the work that goes on in the “medical affairs” departments of pharmaceutical companies, we (...)
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  45.  64
    Shifting Power Relations and the Ethics of Journal Peer Review.Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2011 - Social Epistemology 25 (1):97-121.
    Peer review of manuscripts has recently become a subject of academic research and ethical debate. Critics of the review process argue that it is a means by which powerful members of the scientific community maintain their power, and achieve their personal and communal aspirations, often at others' expense. This qualitative study aimed to generate a rich, empirically?grounded understanding of the process of manuscript review, with a view to informing strategies to improve the review process. Open?ended interviews were carried out with (...)
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  46.  19
    Impediments to “T2” Research: Are Ethics Really to Blame?Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):39-40.
  47.  2
    Are My Religious Beliefs Anyone’s Business? A Framework for Declarations in Health and Biomedicine.Narcyz Ghinea, Miriam Wiersma, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106087.
    Conflicts of interests are typically divided into those that are financial and those that are not. While there is general agreement that financial COIs have a significant impact on decisions and need to be declared and managed, the status of non-financial COIs continues to be disputed. In a recent BMJ feature article it was proposed that religious beliefs should be routinely declared as an interest. The article generated over 41 responses from the medical community and health researchers, which put forward (...)
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  48.  11
    Challenges to the Validity of Using Medicine Labels to Categorize Clinical Behavior: An Empirical and Normative Critique of “Off-Label” Prescribing.Narcyz Ghinea, Ian Kerridge, Miles Little & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (3):574-581.
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  49.  7
    “Some Sort of Fantasy Land”: A Qualitative Investigation of Appropriate Prescribing in Cancer Care.Narcyz Ghinea, Miriam Wiersma, Ian Kerridge, Ian Olver, Sallie Pearson, Richard Day, Winston Liauw & Wendy Lipworth - 2020 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 26 (3):747-754.
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  50.  16
    Disruption, Diversity, and Global Biobanking.Edwina Light, Miriam Wiersma, Lisa Dive, Ian Kerridge, Christine Critchley & Wendy Lipworth - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):45-47.
    Volume 19, Issue 5, May 2019, Page 45-47.
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