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Wendy Lipworth [27]Wendy L. Lipworth [1]
  1.  3
    Debates About Conflict of Interest in Medicine: Deconstructing a Divided Discourse.Serena Purdy, Miles Little, Christopher Mayes & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):135-149.
    The pharmaceutical industry plays an increasingly dominant role in healthcare, raising concerns about “conflicts of interest” on the part of the medical professionals who interact with the industry. However, there is considerable disagreement over the extent to which COI is a problem and how it should be managed. Participants in debates about COI have become entrenched in their views, which is both unproductive and deeply confusing for the majority of medical professionals trying to work in an increasingly commercialized environment. We (...)
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  2.  1
    Declarations, Accusations and Judgement: Examining Conflict of Interest Discourses as Performative Speech-Acts.Christopher Mayes, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (3):455-462.
  3.  14
    Ethics and Epistemology in Big Data Research.Wendy Lipworth, Paul H. Mason, Ian Kerridge & John P. A. Ioannidis - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Biomedical innovation and translation are increasingly emphasizing research using “big data.” The hope is that big data methods will both speed up research and make its results more applicable to “real-world” patients and health services. While big data research has been embraced by scientists, politicians, industry, and the public, numerous ethical, organizational, and technical/methodological concerns have also been raised. With respect to technical and methodological concerns, there is a view that these will be resolved through sophisticated information technologies, predictive algorithms, (...)
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  4.  3
    Meaning and Value in Medical School Curricula.Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Miles Little, Jill Gordon & Pippa Markham - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1027-1035.
    Rationale, aims and objectives: Bioethics and professionalism are standard subjects in medical training programmes, and these curricula reflect particular representations of meaning and practice. It is important that these curricula cohere with the actual concerns of practicing clinicians so that students are prepared for real-world practice. We aimed to identify ethical and professional concerns that do not appear to be adequately addressed in standard curricula by comparing ethics curricula with themes that emerged from a qualitative study of medical practitioners. Method: (...)
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  5.  1
    Evidence, Regulation and ‘Rational’ Prescribing: The Case of Gabapentin for Neuropathic Pain.Narcyz Ghinea, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (1):28-33.
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  6.  3
    Values‐Based Medicine and Modest Foundationalism.Miles Little, Wendy Lipworth, Jill Gordon, Pippa Markham & Ian Kerridge - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1020-1026.
  7.  4
    Health Journalists' Perceptions of Their Professional Roles and Responsibilities for Ensuring the Veracity of Reports of Health Research.Rowena Forsyth, Bronwen Morrell, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Simon Chapman - 2012 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (2):130 - 141.
    Health industries attempt to influence the public through the news media and through their relationships with expert academics and opinion leaders. This study reports journalists' perceptions of their professional roles and responsibilities regarding the relationships between industry and academia and research results. Journalists believe that responsibility for the scientific validity of their reports rests with academics and systems of peer review. However, this approach fails to account for the extent of industry-academy interactions and the flaws of peer review. Health journalists' (...)
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  8.  1
    The Political and Ethical Challenge of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis.Ross Upshur, Ian Kerridge, Wendy Lipworth, Christopher Mayes & Chris Degeling - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (1):107-113.
    This article critically examines current responses to multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and argues that bioethics needs to be willing to engage in a more radical critique of the problem than is currently offered. In particular, we need to focus not simply on market-driven models of innovation and anti-microbial solutions to emergent and re-emergent infections such as TB. The global community also needs to address poverty and the structural factors that entrench inequalities—thus moving beyond the orthodox medical/public health frame of reference.
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  9.  21
    The Epistemology and Ethics of Journal Reviewing: A Second Look. [REVIEW]Paul A. Komesaroff, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (1):3-6.
  10.  14
    Should Biomedical Publishing Be “Opened Up”? Toward a Values-Based Peer-Review Process.Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Stacy Carter & Miles Little - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (3):267-280.
    Peer review of manuscripts for biomedical journals has become a subject of intense ethical debate. One of the most contentious issues is whether or not peer review should be anonymous. This study aimed to generate a rich, empirically-grounded understanding of the values held by journal editors and peer reviewers with a view to informing journal policy. Qualitative methods were used to carry out an inductive analysis of biomedical reviewers’ and editors’ values. Data was derived from in-depth, open-ended interviews with journal (...)
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  11.  5
    Evidence‐Based Medicine and Epistemological Imperialism: Narrowing the Divide Between Evidence and Illness.Helen Crowther, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):868-872.
    Evidence-based medicine has been rapidly and widely adopted because it claims to provide a method for determining the safety and efficacy of medical therapies and public health interventions more generally. However, as others have noted, EBM may be riven through with cultural bias, both in the generation of evidence and in its translation. We suggest that technological and scientific advances in medicine accentuate and entrench these cultural biases, to the extent that they may invalidate the evidence we have about disease (...)
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  12.  1
    Ethics & Evidence in Medical Debates: The Case of Recombinant Activated Factor VII.Narcyz Ghinea, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Miles Little & Richard O. Day - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (2):38-45.
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  13.  49
    The “EBM Movement”: Where Did It Come From, Where is It Going, and Why Does It Matter?Ian Kerridge, Stacy M. Carter & Wendy Lipworth - 2008 - Social Epistemology 22 (4):425-431.
    Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) has now been part of the dominant medical paradigm for 15 years, and has been frequently debated and progressively modified. One question about EBM that has not yet been considered systematically, and is now particularly timely, is the question of the novelty, or otherwise, of the principles and practices of EBM. We argue that answering this question, and the related question of whether EBM-type principles and practices are unique to medicine, sheds new light on EBM and has (...)
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  14.  10
    Doctors on Status and Respect: A Qualitative Study. [REVIEW]Wendy Lipworth, Miles Little, Pippa Markham, Jill Gordon & Ian Kerridge - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):205-217.
    While doctors generally enjoy considerable status, some believe that this is increasingly threatened by consumerism, managerialism, and competition from other health professions. Research into doctors’ perceptions of the changes occurring in medicine has provided some insights into how they perceive and respond to these changes but has generally failed to distinguish clearly between concerns about “status,” related to the entitlements associated with one’s position in a social hierarchy, and concerns about “respect,” related to being held in high regard for one’s (...)
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  15.  9
    How Pharmaceutical Industry Employees Manage Competing Commitments in the Face of Public Criticism.Wendy Lipworth, Kathleen Montgomery & Miles Little - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):355-367.
    The pharmaceutical industry has been criticised for pervasive misconduct. These concerns have generally resulted in increasing regulation. While such regulation is no doubt necessary, it tends to assume that everyone working for pharmaceutical companies is equally motivated by commerce, without much understanding of the specific views and experiences of those who work in different parts of the industry. In order to gain a more nuanced picture of the work that goes on in the “medical affairs” departments of pharmaceutical companies, we (...)
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  16. Overcoming Entrenched Disagreements: The Case of Misoprostol for Post‐Partum Haemorrhage.Narcyz Ghinea, Wendy Lipworth, Miles Little, Ian Kerridge & Richard Day - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (1):48-54.
    The debate about whether misoprostol should be distributed to low resource communities to prevent post-partum haemorrhage, recognised as a major cause of maternal mortality, is deeply polarised. This is in spite of stakeholders having access to the same evidence about the risks and benefits of misoprostol. To understand the disagreement, we conducted a qualitative analysis of the values underpinning debates surrounding community distribution of misoprostol. We found that different moral priorities, epistemic values, and attitudes towards uncertainty were the main factors (...)
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  17.  27
    Shifting Power Relations and the Ethics of Journal Peer Review.Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2011 - Social Epistemology 25 (1):97-121.
    Peer review of manuscripts has recently become a subject of academic research and ethical debate. Critics of the review process argue that it is a means by which powerful members of the scientific community maintain their power, and achieve their personal and communal aspirations, often at others' expense. This qualitative study aimed to generate a rich, empirically?grounded understanding of the process of manuscript review, with a view to informing strategies to improve the review process. Open?ended interviews were carried out with (...)
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  18.  17
    Generating a Taxonomy of Regulatory Responses to Emerging Issues in Biomedicine.Wendy Lipworth - 2005 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (3):130-141.
    In the biomedical field, calls for the generation of new regulations or for the amendment of existing regulations often follow the emergence of apparently new research practices (such as embryonic stem cell research), clinical practices (such as facial transplantation) and entities (such as Avian Influenza/’Bird Flu’). Calls for regulatory responses also arise as a result of controversies which bring to light longstanding practices, such as the call for increased regulation of human tissue collections that followed the discovery of unauthorised post-mortem (...)
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  19.  8
    Impediments to “T2” Research: Are Ethics Really to Blame?Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):39-40.
  20.  16
    On the Fragility of Medical Virtue in a Neoliberal Context: The Case of Commercial Conflicts of Interest in Reproductive Medicine.Christopher Mayes, Brette Blakely, Ian Kerridge, Paul Komesaroff, Ian Olver & Wendy Lipworth - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (1):97-111.
    Social, political, and economic environments play an active role in nurturing professional virtue. Yet, these environments can also lead to the erosion of virtue. As such, professional virtue is fragile and vulnerable to environmental shifts. While physicians are often considered to be among the most virtuous of professional groups, concern has also always existed about the impact of commercial arrangements on physicians’ willingness and capacity to enact their professional virtues. This article examines the ways in which commercial arrangements have been (...)
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  21.  14
    Deriving and Critiquing an Empirically Based Framework for Pharmaceutical Ethics.Wendy Lipworth & Miles Little - 2014 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 5 (1):23-32.
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  22.  3
    More Than One Way to Be Global: Globalization of Research and the Contest of Ideas.Paul H. Mason, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (10):48-49.
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  23.  4
    Power and Control in Interactions Between Journalists and Health-Related Industries: The View From Industry.Bronwen Morrell, Wendy L. Lipworth, Rowena Forsyth, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):233-244.
    The mass media is a major source of health information for the public, and as such the quality and independence of health news reporting is an important concern. Concerns have been expressed that journalists reporting on health are increasingly dependent on their sources—including representatives of industries responsible for manufacturing health-related products—for story ideas and content. Many critics perceive an imbalance of power between journalists and industry sources, with industry being in a position of relative power, however the empirical evidence to (...)
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  24.  2
    Consent to Biobank Research: Facing Up to the Challenge of Globalization.Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (9):58-59.
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  25.  5
    Ethics as an Act of Listening.Wendy Lipworth, Bronwen Morrell & Ian Kerridge - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):80-81.
  26. Access to High Cost Cancer Medicines Through the Lens of an Australian Senate Inquiry—Defining the “Goods” at Stake.Narcyz Ghinea, Miles Little & Wendy Lipworth - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Cancer is a major burden on populations and health systems internationally. The development of innovative cancer medicines is seen as a significant part of the solution. These new cancer medicines are, however, expensive, leading to limited or delayed access and disagreements among stakeholders about which medicines to fund. There is no obvious resolution to these disagreements, with stakeholders holding firmly to divergent positions. Access to cancer medicines was recently explored in Australia in a Senate Inquiry into the Availability of New, (...)
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  27. Challenges to the Validity of Using Medicine Labels to Categorize Clinical Behavior: An Empirical and Normative Critique of “Off-Label” Prescribing.Narcyz Ghinea, Ian Kerridge, Miles Little & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (3):574-581.
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  28. Towards a Bioethics of Innovation.Wendy Lipworth & Renata Axler - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (7):445-449.
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