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Wendy Wheeler
London Metropolitan University
  1.  56
    How Can the Study of the Humanities Inform the Study of Biosemiotics?Donald Favareau, Kalevi Kull, Gerald Ostdiek, Timo Maran, Louise Westling, Paul Cobley, Frederik Stjernfelt, Myrdene Anderson, Morten Tønnessen & Wendy Wheeler - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (1):9-31.
    This essay – a collection of contributions from 10 scholars working in the field of biosemiotics and the humanities – considers nature in culture. It frames this by asking the question ‘Why does biosemiotics need the humanities?’. Each author writes from the background of their own disciplinary perspective in order to throw light upon their interdisciplinary engagement with biosemiotics. We start with Donald Favareau, whose originary disciplinary home is ethnomethodology and linguistics, and then move on to Paul Cobley’s contribution on (...)
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  2.  22
    ‘Do Not Block the Path of Inquiry!’: Peircean Abduction, the Tacit Dimension, and Biosemiotic Creativity in Nature and Culture.Wendy Wheeler - 2008 - American Journal of Semiotics 24 (1/3):171-187.
    Drawing on biosemiotic theory and the Peircean idea of ‘abduction’, I shall propose the idea of a layered structure of bio / semiotic evolution, in which humanknowledge is systemic and recursive — and thus emergent both from what is forgotten and from earlier evolutionary strata. I will argue that abductions are those processes by which we move creatively between often unacknowledged types of knowledge which are rooted in our natural and cultural evolutionary past and the more familiar types of knowledge (...)
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  3. The Whole Creature: Complexity.Wendy Wheeler - forthcoming - Biosemiotics, and The.
     
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  4.  11
    A Connoisseur of Magical Coincidences: Chance, Creativity and Poiesis From a Biosemiotic Perspective.Wendy Wheeler - 2014 - Biosemiotics 7 (3):389-404.
    Semiotics, in the guise of the limited Saussurean semiology, has been widely used in the humanities and in cultural studies for the past 20 to 30 years at least. With the advent, nearly 20 years ago, of the environmental humanities, including the new field of humanities animal studies, the weaknesses of this mode of analysis became increasingly clear. This essay forms part of a larger attempt to develop a Peirce-informed biosemiotic theory capable of affording conceptual tools for the broad-based study (...)
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  5.  16
    Delectable Creatures and the Fundamental Reality of Metaphor: Biosemiotics and Animal Mind. [REVIEW]Wendy Wheeler - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (3):277-287.
    This article argues that organisms, defined by a semi-permeable membrane or skin separating organism from environment, are (must be) semiotically alert responders to environments (both Innenwelt and Umwelt). As organisms and environments complexify over time, so, necessarily, does semiotic responsiveness, or ‘semiotic freedom’. In complex environments, semiotic responsiveness necessitates increasing plasticity of discernment, or discrimination. Such judgements, in other words, involve interpretations. The latter, in effect, consist of translations of a range of sign relations which, like metaphor, are based on (...)
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  6.  28
    The Wrecked Vessel: The Effects of Gnosticism, Nominalism and the Protestant Reformation in the Semiotic Scaffolding of Modern Scientific Consciousness.Wendy Wheeler - 2015 - Biosemiotics 8 (2):305-324.
    This essay discusses the semiotic scaffolding of modern science, the roots of which lie in the Protestant Reformation and the latter’s repudiation of the “semiotics of nature” upon which medieval theology depended. Taking the fourteenth-century battles between realism and nominalism as the semiotic scaffolding of the Reformation which was subsequently built on nominalist principles, and the Reformation as what made possible the development of early modern science, this essay argues that nominalism, Protestantism, and early modern science were all infected by (...)
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  7.  3
    The Carrying: Material Frames and Immaterial Meanings.Wendy Wheeler - 2014 - Sign Systems Studies 42 (2/3):399-411.
    Jakob von Uexküll Lecture; University of Tartu, 30 April 2014.
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