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  1.  18
    A New Look at Habits and the Habit-Goal Interface.Wendy Wood & David T. Neal - 2007 - Psychological Review 114 (4):843-863.
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  2.  13
    Automaticity in Situ and in Te Lab: The Nature of Habit in Daily Life.David T. Neal & Wendy Wood - 2009 - In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press. pp. 442--457.
  3.  71
    Universal Sex Differences Across Patriarchal Cultures [Not Equal] Evolved Psychological Dispositions.Alice H. Eagly & Wendy Wood - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):281-283.
    Schmitt's findings provide little evidence that sex differences in sociosexuality are explained by evolved dispositions. These sex differences are better explained by an evolutionary account that treats the psychological attributes of women and men as emergent, given the biological attributes of the sexes, especially female reproductive capacity, and the economic and social structural aspects of societies.
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  4.  34
    Linking Addictions to Everyday Habits and Plans.David T. Neal & Wendy Wood - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):455-456.
    Redish et al. trace vulnerabilities in habit and planning systems almost exclusively to pharmacological effects of addictive substances on underlying brain systems. As we discuss, however, these systems also can be disrupted by purely psychological factors inherent in normal decision-making and everyday behavior. A truly unified model must integrate the contribution of both sets of factors in driving addiction.
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  5.  70
    The Origins of Aggression Sex Differences: Evolved Dispositions Versus Social Roles.Alice H. Eagly & Wendy Wood - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):223-224.
    The ultimate causes of sex differences in human aggressive behavior can lie mainly in evolved, inherited mechanisms that differ by sex or mainly in the differing placement of women and men in the social structure. The present commentary contrasts Campbell's evolutionary interpretation of aggression sex differences with a social structural interpretation that encompasses a wider range of phenomena.
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  6.  18
    Sexual Selection Does Not Provide an Adequate Theory of Sex Differences in Aggression.Alice H. Eagly & Wendy Wood - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):276-277.
    Our social role/biosocial theory provides a more adequate account of aggression sex differences than does Archer's sexual selection theory. In our theory, these sex differences arise flexibly from sociocultural and ecological forces in interaction with humans' biology, as defined by female and male physical attributes and reproductive activities. Our comments elaborate our theory's explanations for the varied phenomena that Archer presents.
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