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Wes Morriston [40]Wesley Morriston [17]
  1. God and the Ontological Foundation of Morality.Wes Morriston - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (1):15 - 34.
    In recent years, William Lane Craig has vigorously championed a moral argument for God's existence. The backbone of Craig's argument is the claim that only God can provide a ' sound foundation in reality' for morality. The present article has three principal aims. The first is to interpret and clarify the account of the ontological foundation of morality proposed by Craig. The second is to press home an important objection to that account. The third is to expose the weakness of (...)
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  2. Omnipotence and Necessary Moral Perfection: Are They Compatible?Wes Morriston - 2001 - Religious Studies 37 (2):143-160.
    This paper elaborates and defends an argument for saying that if God is necessarily good (morally perfect in all possible worlds), then He does not have the maximum conceivable amount of power and so is not all-powerful. It considers and rejects several of the best-known attempts to show that necessary moral perfection is consistent with the requirements of omnipotence, and concludes by suggesting that a less than all-powerful person might still be the greatest possible being. Great is your power, and (...)
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  3.  7
    Prolegomena to a Philosophy of Religion.Wes Morriston - 2005 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (2):113-117.
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  4. Beginningless Past, Endless Future, and the Actual Infinite.Wes Morriston - 2010 - Faith and Philosophy 27 (4):439-450.
    One of the principal lines of argument deployed by the friends of the kalām cosmological argument against the possibility of a beginningless series of events is a quite general argument against the possibility of an actual infinite. The principal thesis of the present paper is that if this argument worked as advertised, parallel considerations would force us to conclude, not merely that a series of discrete, successive events must have a first member, but also that such a series must have (...)
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  5. What If God Commanded Something Terrible? A Worry for Divine-Command Meta-Ethics: Wes Morriston.Wes Morriston - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (3):249-267.
    If God commanded something that was obviously evil, would we have a moral obligation to do it? I critically examine three radically different approaches divine-command theorists may take to the problem posed by this question: (1) reject the possibility of such a command by appealing to God's essential goodness; (2) avoid the implication that we should obey such a command by modifying the divine-command theory; and (3) accept the implication that we should obey such a command by appealing to divine (...)
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  6. A Critique of the Kalam Cosmological Argument.Wes Morriston - unknown
     
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  7.  5
    Endless and Infinite.Alex Malpass & Wes Morriston - 2020 - Philosophical Quarterly 70 (281):830-849.
    It is often said that time must have a beginning because otherwise the series of past events would have the paradoxical features of an actual infinite. In the present paper, we show that, even given a dynamic theory of time, the cardinality of an endless series of events, each of which will occur, is the same as that of a beginningless series of events, each of which has occurred. Both are denumerably infinite. So if an endless series of events is (...)
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  8.  83
    Omnipotence and the Power to Choose: A Reply to Wielenberg.Wes Morriston - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (3):358-367.
  9.  85
    Beginningless Past and Endless Future: Reply to Craig.Wes Morriston - 2012 - Faith and Philosophy 29 (4):444-450.
    In a recent paper, I claimed that if a familiar line of argument against the possibility of a beginningless series of events worked as advertised, it would work just as well against the possibility of an endless series of pre-determined events. The present paper is my response to objections by William Lane Craig. It argues that neither Craig’s claim that an endless series of events is a merely potential infinite nor his claim that future events don’t exist is successful in (...)
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  10.  86
    Craig on the Actual Infinite.Wes Morriston - 2002 - Religious Studies 38 (2):147-166.
    In a series of much discussed articles and books, William Lane Craig defends the view that the past could not consist in a beginningless series of events. In the present paper, I cast a critical eye on just one part of Craig's case for the finitude of the past – viz. his philosophical argument against the possibility of actually infinite sets of objects in the ‘real world’. I shall try to show that this argument is unsuccessful. I shall also take (...)
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  11. Is God “Significantly Free?”.Wesley Morriston - 1985 - Faith and Philosophy 2 (3):257-264.
    In an impressive series of books and articles, Alvin Plantinga has developed challenging new versions of two much discussed pieces of philosophical theology: the free will defense and the ontological argument.' His treatment of both subjects has provoked a tremendous amount of critical comment. What has not been generally noticed', however, is that when taken together, Plantinga's views on these two subjects lead to a very serious problem in philosophical theology. The premises of his version of the ontological argument, when (...)
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  12.  43
    The Evidential Argument From Goodness.Wes Morriston - 2004 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):87-101.
    severe and prolonged pain, in heartbreak and destruction, in disloyalty and betrayal, in the suffering of the innocent, in unjust punishment. He has, in short, an intense dislike for anything that you or I might approve of or enjoy. If he had his druthers we'd all be utterly miserable and come to a bad end. Now I' ve certainly never met a demonist, and I suppose we can agree that demonism would be an extraordinarily implausible view. Still, it is worth (...)
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  13.  97
    Creation Ex Nihilo and the Big Bang.Wes Morriston - 2002 - Philo 5 (1):23-33.
    William Lane Craig claims that the doctrine of creation ex nihilo is strongly supported by the Big Bang theory of the origin of the universe. In the present paper, I critically examine Craig’s arguments for this claim. I conclude that they are unsuccessful, and that the Big Bang theory provides no support for the doctrine of creation ex nihilo. Even if it is granted that the universe had a “first cause,” there is no reason to think that this cause created (...)
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  14.  37
    Must Metaphysical Time Have a Beginning?Wes Morriston - 2003 - Faith and Philosophy 20 (3):288-306.
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  15. The Moral Obligations of Reasonable Non-Believers: A Special Problem for Divine Command Metaethics.Wes Morriston - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (1):1 - 10.
    People who do not believe that there is a God constitute an obvious problem for divine command metaethics. They have moral obligations, and are often enough aware of having them. Yet it is not easy to think of such persons as “hearing” divine commands. This makes it hard to see how a divine command theory can offer a completely general account of the nature of moral obligation. The present paper takes a close look at this issue as it emerges in (...)
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  16.  26
    Must There Be a Standard of Moral Goodness Apart From God?Wes Morriston - 2001 - Philosophia Christi 2 (1):127-138.
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  17. What is so Good About Moral Freedom?Wes Morriston - 2000 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):344-358.
    Many Christian philosophers believe that it is a great good that human beings are free to choose between good and evil – so good, indeed, that God is justified in putting up with a great many evil choices for the sake of it. But many of the same Christian philosophers also believe that God is essentially good – good in every possible world. Unlike his sinful human creatures, God cannot choose between good and evil. In that sense, he is not (...)
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  18. Are Omnipotence and Necessary Moral Perfection Compatible? Reply to Mawson.Wes Morriston - 2003 - Religious Studies 39 (4):441-449.
    In response to an earlier paper of mine, T. J. Mawson has argued that omnipotence is logically incompatible with wrong-doing, ‘whilst accepting that there is “a genuine, active power knowingly to choose evil” and thus leaving room for a free-will defence to the problem of evil’. Here, I attempt to show that Mawson is mistaken on both counts – that his argument for the incompatibility of omnipotence and wrong-doing is defective, and that the free-will defence cannot be sustained on the (...)
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  19.  75
    Must the Beginning of the Universe Have a Personal Cause?Wes Morriston - 2000 - Faith and Philosophy 17 (2):149-169.
    The aim of this paper is to take a close look at some little discussed aspects of the kalam cosmological argument, with a view to deciding whether there is any reason to believe the causal principle on which it rests (“Whatever begins to exist must have a cause”), and also with a view to determining what conclusions can be drawn about the nature of the First Cause of the universe (supposing thatthere is one). I am particularly concerned with the problems (...)
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  20.  34
    ‘Terrible’ Divine Commands Revisited: A Response to Davis and Franks.Wes Morriston - 2016 - Religious Studies 52 (3):361-373.
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  21.  19
    Is Faith in the Ultimate Rationally Required? Taking Issue with Some Arguments in The Will to Imagine.Wes Morriston - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (2):209-220.
    According to J. L. Schellenberg, sceptical faith in the Ultimate is not merely permitted, but is rationally required. It is, all things considered, the response that we should make. In this article, I assess just three of Schellenberg's arguments for this bold conclusion. I explain why I find each of them unpersuasive.
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  22.  43
    Power, Liability, and the Free-Will Defence: Reply to Mawson.Wes Morriston - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (1):71-80.
    Tim Mawson argues that the ability to choose what one knows to be morally wrong is a power for some persons in some circumstances, but that it would be a mere liability for God. The lynchpin of Mawson 's argument is his claim that a power is an ability that it is good to have. In this rejoinder, I challenge this claim of Mawson 's, arguing that choosing a course of action is always an exercise of power, whether or not (...)
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  23.  49
    Must the Past Have a Beginning?Wes Morriston - 1999 - Philo 2 (1):5-19.
    In defense of his claim that the universe must have been created, William Lane Craig gives two distinct philosophical arguments against the possibility of an infinite past. The first appeals to various paradoxes allegedly generated by the idea of an actual infinite. The second appeals to a dynamic theory of the nature of time, and tries to show on that basis that an infinite series of events could not have been “formed by successive addition.” The present paper is concerned with (...)
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  24.  17
    Did God Command Genocide? A Challenge to the Biblical Inerrantist.Wesley Morriston - 2009 - Philosophia Christi 11 (1):7-26.
    Thoughtful Christians who hold the Old Testament in high regard must at some point come to terms with those passages in which God is said to command what appear to be moral atrocities. In the present paper, I argue that the genocide passages in the Old Testament provide us with a strong prima facie reason to reject biblical inerrancy—that in the absence of better reasons for thinking that the Bible is inerrant, a Christian should conclude that God did not in (...)
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  25.  29
    Is God Free? Reply to Wierenga.Wes Morriston - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (1):93-98.
  26.  30
    Explanatory Priority and the Counterfactuals of Freedom.Wes Morriston - 2001 - Faith and Philosophy 18 (1):21-35.
    On a Molinist account of creation and providence, not only is there is a complete set of truths about what every possible person would freely do in any possible set of circumstances, but these conditional truths are part of the very explanation of our existence. Robert Adams has recently argued that the explanatory priority of these conditionals undermines libertarian freedom. In the present essay, I take at close look at Adams’ argument and at the Molinist response of Thomas Flint. After (...)
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  27.  96
    Ethical Criticism of the Bible: The Case of Divinely Mandated Genocide.Wes Morriston - 2012 - Sophia 51 (1):117-135.
    Taking as a test case biblical texts in which the God of Israel commands the destruction other nations, the present paper defends the legitimacy and the necessity of ethical criticism of the Bible. It takes issue with the suggestions of several contemporary Christian philosophers who have recently defended the view that (in Israel’s early history) God had good and morally sufficient reasons for commanding genocide.
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  28.  29
    What is so Good About Moral Freedom&Quest.Wes Morriston - 2000 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):344-358.
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  29.  18
    Must the Beginning of the Universe Have a Personal Cause?: A Critical Examination of the Kalam Cosmological Argument.Wes Morriston - 2000 - Faith and Philosophy 17 (2):149-169.
    The aim of this paper is to take a close look at some little discussed aspects of the kalam cosmological argument, with a view to deciding whether there is any reason to believe the causal principle on which it rests, and also with a view to determining what conclusions can be drawn about the nature of the First Cause of the universe. I am particularly concerned with the problems that arise when it is assumed that that the First Cause is (...)
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  30.  44
    Causes and Beginnings in the Kalam Argument: Reply to Craig.Wes Morriston - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (2):233-244.
  31.  60
    Creation Out of Nothing: A Biblical, Philosophical, and Scientific Exploration. [REVIEW]Wes Morriston - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (3):352-357.
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  32.  41
    Omnipotence and the Anselmian God.Wes Morriston - 2001 - Philo 4 (1):7-20.
    Can God be both omnipotent and essentially good? Working with the Anselmian conception of God as the greatest possible being, a number of philosophers have tried to show that omnipotence should be understood in such a way that these properties are compatible. In the present paper, I argue that we can, without inconsistency or other obvious absurdity, conceive of a being more powerful than the Anselmian God. I conclude that contemporary Anselmian philosophers have conflated two logically distinct questions: (1) How (...)
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  33.  87
    Is Goodness Without God Good Enough? A Debate on Faith, Secularism, and Ethics: Robert K. Garcia, Nathan L. King . Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Inc., Lanham, MD, 2008, Viii and 220 Pp, $24.95.Wes Morriston - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (1):85-89.
    Is goodness without god good enough? A debate on faith, secularism, and ethics Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11153-010-9243-8 Authors Wes Morriston, University of Colorado, Boulder Department of Philosophy Boulder CO 80309-0232 USA Journal International Journal for Philosophy of Religion Online ISSN 1572-8684 Print ISSN 0020-7047.
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  34.  17
    Is Plantinga’s God Omnipotent?Wesley Morriston - 1984 - Sophia 23 (3):45-57.
  35.  28
    Must an ‘Origins Agnostic’ Be Skeptical About Everything?Wes Morriston - 2008 - Philo 11 (2):165-176.
    Plantinga claims to give a person who is agnostic about the ultimate source of his cognitive faculties an undefeatable defeater for all his beliefs. This argument of Plantinga’s bears a family resemblance to his much better known argument for saying that naturalism is self-defeating, but it has a much more ambitious conclusion. In the present paper, I try to show both that Plantinga’s argument for this conclusion fails, and that even if an “origins agnostic” were to succumb to it, a (...)
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  36.  36
    Experience and Causality in the Philosophy of Merleau-Ponty.Wesley Morriston - 1979 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 39 (4):561-574.
  37.  72
    God's Answer to Job.Wesley Morriston - 1996 - Religious Studies 32 (3):339 - 356.
    At the dramatic climax of the book of Job, God answers Job from a whirlwind; but it is notoriously difficult to see how this answer addresses the problem posed by Job's suffering. In this paper, I am especially concerned with the following questions. What underlying problem is the poet wrestling with? How is God's answer to Job supposed to be relevant to this problem? And why is Job satisfied by it? I critically consider what seem to me to be two (...)
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  38.  22
    Brute Contingency and the Principle of Sufficient Reason.Wesley Morriston - 1977 - Philosophy Research Archives 3:845-861.
    This essay deals with a Leibnizian version of the argument from the contingent existence of the world to the necessary existence of God, especially with the statements of the argument presented by Father Copleston in his famous B.B.C. debate with Bertrand Russell and, more recently, by Richard Taylor, in his Metaphysics. The essay is divided into two parts. In the first part, I am chiefly concerned with showing how the principle of sufficient reason, together with the claim that something contingent (...)
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  39.  21
    Does Plantinga’s God Have Freedom Canceling Control Over His Creatures?: A Response to Richard Gale.Wes Morriston - 2003 - Philo 6 (1):67-77.
    According to Alvin Plantinga and his followers, there is a complete set of truths about what any possible person would freely do in anypossible situation. Richard Gale offers two arguments for saying that this doctrine entails that God exercises “freedom-canceling” control over his creatures. Gale’s first argument claims that Plantinga’s God controls our behavior by determining our psychological makeup. The second claims that God causes all of our behavior. The present paper critically examines and rejects both of these arguments. The (...)
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  40.  8
    Intentionality and Phenomenological Method-Critique of Husserls Transcendental Idealism.Wesley Morriston - 1976 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 7 (1):33-43.
  41. Faith and Philosophy.Wes Morriston - unknown
    A person has the first-order volition she has because of the second-order volition she has. A deeply divided person lacks a single, integrated second-order..
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  42.  45
    J. L. Schellenberg, the Wisdom to Doubt: A Justification of Religious Skepticism. [REVIEW]Wes Morriston - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (3):179-183.
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  43.  27
    Pike and Hoffman on Divine Foreknowledge and Human Freedom.Wesley Morriston - 1982 - Philosophy Research Archives 8:521-529.
    In an article published several years ago, Nelson Pike recast his well known argument for the incompatibility of divine omniscience and human freedom in terms of a “possible worlds” analysis of human power. In this version, the argument is based on the assumption that past circumstances in the actual world “help to determine present powers.” If I am able to do something at the present time, Pike claims, there must be a possible world with a past just like the past (...)
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  44.  24
    "Two Perspectives" Compatibilism.Wesley Morriston - 1979 - Journal of Critical Analysis 7 (4):119-123.
  45.  32
    J. L. Schellenberg, Prolegomena to a Philosophy of Religion.Wes Morriston - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (2):113-117.
  46.  28
    Gladness, Regret, God, and Evil a Reply to Hasker.Wesley Morriston - 1982 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):401-407.
  47.  21
    Heidegger on the World.Wesley Morriston - 1972 - Man and World 5 (4):452-467.
  48.  17
    J. L. Schellenberg: The Will to Imagine: A Justification of Skeptical Religion: Cornell University Press, Ithaca and London, 2007, Xv and 267 Pages, $45.00. [REVIEW]Wes Morriston - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (2):107-111.
  49.  17
    Gladness, Regret, God, and Evil.Wesley Morriston - 1982 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):401-407.
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  50. Education.Wes Morriston - unknown
    Selected by graduating philosophy majors for a $1000 departmental teaching award, 2005 Boulder Faculty Assembly Teaching Excellence Award, University of Colorado, 2001 resident’s eaching cholar, niversity of olorado, 1992-94 Boulder Faculty Assembly Teaching Excellence Award, University of Colorado, 1981..
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