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Wesley C. Salmon [125]Wesley Salmon [25]Wesley C. Salmon Y. Merrilee Salmon [1]
  1. Scientific Explanation and the Causal Structure of the World.Wesley Salmon - 1984 - Princeton University Press.
    The philosophical theory of scientific explanation proposed here involves a radically new treatment of causality that accords with the pervasively statistical character of contemporary science. Wesley C. Salmon describes three fundamental conceptions of scientific explanation--the epistemic, modal, and ontic. He argues that the prevailing view is untenable and that the modal conception is scientifically out-dated. Significantly revising aspects of his earlier work, he defends a causal/mechanical theory that is a version of the ontic conception. Professor Salmon's theory furnishes a robust (...)
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  2. Causality and Explanation.Wesley C. Salmon - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    Wesley Salmon is renowned for his seminal contributions to the philosophy of science. He has powerfully and permanently shaped discussion of such issues as lawlike and probabilistic explanation and the interrelation of explanatory notions to causal notions. This unique volume brings together twenty-six of his essays on subjects related to causality and explanation, written over the period 1971-1995. Six of the essays have never been published before and many others have only appeared in obscure venues. The volume includes a section (...)
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  3.  84
    Scientific Explanation.Philip Kitcher & Wesley Salmon (eds.) - 1989 - Univ of Minnesota Pr.
    Studdert-Kennedy, Gerald, Evidence and Explanation in Social Science. ... Kauffman, Stuart, "Articulation of Parts Explanation in Biology and the Rational ...
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  4. 4 Decades of Scientific Explanation.Wesley C. Salmon - 1989 - Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science 13:3-219.
  5.  13
    Scientific Explanation and the Causal Structure of the World.Ronald N. Giere & Wesley C. Salmon - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (3):444.
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  6. Statistical Explanation & Statistical Relevance.Wesley Salmon - 1971 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
    Through his S–R model of statistical relevance, Wesley Salmon offers a solution to the scientific explanation of objectively improbable events.
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  7.  94
    The Foundations of Scientific Inference.Wesley C. Salmon - 1966 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
    This is an authoritative and up-to-date treatment of the subject, and yet it is relatively brief and nontechnical.
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  8. Causality and Explanation: A Reply to Two Critiques.Wesley C. Salmon - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (3):461-477.
    This paper discusses several distinct process theories of causality offered in recent years by Phil Dowe and me. It addresses problems concerning the explication of causal process, causal interaction, and causal transmission, whether given in terms of transmission of marks, transmission of invariant or conserved quantities, or mere possession of conserved quantities. Renouncing the mark-transmission and invariant quantity criteria, I accept a conserved quantity theory similar to Dowe's--differing basically with respect to causal transmission. This paper also responds to several fundamental (...)
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  9. Causality Without Counterfactuals.Wesley C. Salmon - 1994 - Philosophy of Science 61 (2):297-312.
    This paper presents a drastically revised version of the theory of causality, based on analyses of causal processes and causal interactions, advocated in Salmon (1984). Relying heavily on modified versions of proposals by P. Dowe, this article answers penetrating objections by Dowe and P. Kitcher to the earlier theory. It shows how the new theory circumvents a host of difficulties that have been raised in the literature. The result is, I hope, a more satisfactory analysis of physical causality.
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  10. Four Decades of Scientific Explanation.Wesley C. Salmon & Anne Fagot-Largeault - 1989 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):355.
    As Aristotle stated, scientific explanation is based on deductive argument--yet, Wesley C. Salmon points out, not all deductive arguments are qualified explanations. The validity of the explanation must itself be examined. _Four Decades of Scientific Explanation_ provides a comprehensive account of the developments in scientific explanation that transpired in the last four decades of the twentieth century. It continues to stand as the most comprehensive treatment of the writings on the subject during these years. Building on the historic 1948 essay (...)
     
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  11. Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science.Philip Kitcher & Wesley C. Salmon - 1989 - Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science 13.
  12. Statistical Explanation.Wesley C. Salmon - 1970 - In Robert Colodny (ed.), The Nature and Function of Scientific Theories. University of Pittsburgh Press. pp. 173--231.
     
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  13. Van Fraassen on Explanation.Philip Kitcher & Wesley Salmon - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy 84 (6):315-330.
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  14. Why Ask, "Why?"? An Inquiry Concerning Scientific Explanation.Wesley C. Salmon - 1978 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 51 (6):683 - 705.
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  15.  30
    Probabilistic Causality.Wesley C. Salmon - 1980 - In Michael Tooley (ed.), Pacific Philosophical Quarterly. Oxford Up. pp. 137-153.
  16. Hans Reichenbach's Vindication of Induction.Wesley C. Salmon - 1991 - Erkenntnis 35 (1-3):99 - 122.
    Reichenbach sought to resolve Hume's problem of the justification of induction by means of a pragmatic vindication that relies heavily on the convergence properties of his rule of induction. His attempt to rule out all other asymptotic methods by an appeal to descriptive simplicity was unavailing. We found that important progress in that direction could be made by invoking normalizing conditions (consistency) and methodological simplicity (as a basis for invariance), but that they did not do the whole job. I am (...)
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  17. 3.Wesley C. Salmon - 1984 - In Scientific Explanation and the Causal Structure of the World. Princeton University Press. pp. 78-109.
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  18.  63
    Rationality and Objectivity in Science or Tom Kuhn Meets Tom Bayes.Wesley Salmon - 1990 - In C. Wade Savage (ed.), Scientific Theories. University of Minnesota Press. pp. 14--175.
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  19. Rational Prediction.Wesley C. Salmon - 1981 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 32 (2):115-125.
  20.  86
    Scientific Explanation: Three Basic Conceptions.Wesley C. Salmon - 1984 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:293 - 305.
    By contrasting three general conceptions of scientific explanation, this paper seeks to clarify the explanandum and to exhibit the fundamental philosophical issues involved in the project of explicating scientific explanation. The three conceptions--epistemic, modal, and ontic--have both historical and contemporary importance. In the context of Laplacian determinism, they do not seem importantly distinct, but in the context of irreducibly statistical explanations, the three are seen to diverge sharply. The paper argues for a causal/mechanical version of the ontic conception, and concludes (...)
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  21.  7
    Logic.Wesley C. Salmon - 1963 - Englewood Cliffs, N.J., Prentice-Hall.
  22.  94
    Zeno's Paradoxes.Wesley C. Salmon (ed.) - 1970 - Bobbs-Merrill.
    ABNER SHIMONY of the Paradox A PHILOSOPHICAL PUPPET PLAY Dramatis personae: Zeno , Pupil, Lion Scene: The school of Zeno at Elea. Pup. Master! ...
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  23.  12
    Van Fraassen on Explanation.Philip Kitcher & Wesley Salmon - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy 84 (6):315.
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  24.  21
    Logical Empiricism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives.Paolo Parrini, Merrilee H. Salmon & Wesley C. Salmon (eds.) - 2003 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
    This collection of essays reexamines the origins of logical empiricism and offers fresh insights into its relationship to contemporary philosophy of science.
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  25. Space, Time and Motion.Wesley C. Salmon - 1980 - University of Minnesota Press.
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  26.  32
    The Appraisal of Theories: Kuhn Meets Bayes.Wesley C. Salmon - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:325 - 332.
    This paper claims that adoption of Bayes's theorem as the schema for the appraisal of scientific theories can greatly reduce the distance between Kuhnians and logical empiricists. It is argued that plausibility considerations, which Kuhn considered outside of the logic of science, can be construed as prior probabilities, which play an indispensable role in the logic of science. Problems concerning likelihoods, especially the likelihood on the "catchall," are also considered. Severe difficulties concerning the significance of this probability arise in the (...)
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  27.  62
    Reality and Rationality.C. Salmon Wesley - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume of articles (most published, some new) is a follow-up to the late Wesley C. Salmon's widely read collection Causality And Explanation (OUP 1998). It contains both published and unpublished articles, and focuses on two related areas of inquiry: First, is science a rational enterprise? Secondly, does science yield objective information about our world, even the aspects that we cannot observe directly? Salmon's own take is that objective knowledge of the world is possible, and his work in these articles (...)
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  28.  16
    The Foundations of Scientific Inference.Peter Achinstein & Wesley C. Salmon - 1969 - Philosophical Review 78 (4):531.
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  29. An "at-at" Theory of Causal Influence.Wesley C. Salmon - 1977 - Philosophy of Science 44 (2):215-224.
    The propagation of causal influences through space-time seems to play a fundamental role in scientific explanation. Taking as a point of departure a basic distinction between causal interactions (which are localized in space-time) and causal processes (which may extend through vast regions of space-time), this paper attempts an analysis of the concept of causal propagation on the basis of the ability of causal processes to transmit "marks." The analysis rests upon the "at-at" theory of motion which has figured prominently in (...)
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  30. Indeterminism and Epistemic Relativization.Wesley C. Salmon - 1977 - Philosophy of Science 44 (2):199-202.
    Carl G. Hempel's doctrine of essential epistemic relativization of inductive-statistical explanation seems to entail the unintelligibility of the notion of objective homogeneity of reference classes. This discussion note explores the question of whether, as a consequence, essential epistemic relativization also entails the unintelligibility of the doctrine of indeterminism.
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  31.  5
    Hans Reichenbach: Logical Empiricist.Wesley C. Salmon - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (3):448-453.
  32.  36
    Propensities: A Discussion Review. [REVIEW]Wesley C. Salmon - 1979 - Erkenntnis 14 (2):183 - 216.
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  33.  40
    The Value of Scientific Understanding.Wesley C. Salmon - 1993 - Philosophica 51.
  34.  62
    Scientific Explanation: Causation and Unification.Wesley C. Salmon - 1990 - Critica 22 (66):3 - 23.
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  35.  78
    Should We Attempt to Justify Induction?Wesley C. Salmon - 1957 - Philosophical Studies 8 (3):33 - 48.
  36. Reply to Lehman.Wesley C. Salmon - 1973 - Philosophy of Science 40 (3):397-402.
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  37. The Short Run.Wesley C. Salmon - 1955 - Philosophy of Science 22 (3):214-221.
  38. The Spirit of Logical Empiricism: Carl G. Hempel's Role in Twentieth-Century Philosophy of Science.Wesley C. Salmon - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (3):333-350.
    In this paper, I discuss the key role played by Carl G. Hempel's work on theoretical realism and scientific explanation in effecting a crucial philosophical transition between the beginning and the end of the twentieth century. At the beginning of the century, the dominant view was that science is incapable of furnishing explanations of natural phenomena; at the end, explanation is widely viewed as an important, if not the primary, goal of science. In addition to its intellectual benefits, this transition (...)
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  39. Logic, Language, and the Structure of Scientific Theories.Wesley C. Salmon & Gereon Wolters (eds.) - 1994 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
    This volume honors and examines the founders of the philosophy of logical empiricism. Historical and interpretive essays clarify the scientific philosophies of Carnap, Reichenbach, Hempel, Kant, and others, while exploring the main topics of logical empiricist philosophy of science.
     
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  40. Religion and Science: A New Look at Hume's Dialogues.Wesley C. Salmon - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 33 (2):143 - 176.
    This article deals with the design argument for the existence of God as it is discussed in hume's "dialogues concerning natural religion". Using bayes's theorem in the probability calculus--Which hume almost certainly could not have known as such--It shows how the various arguments advanced by philo and cleanthes fit neatly into a comprehensive logical structure. The conclusion is drawn that, Not only does the empirical evidence fail to support the theistic hypothesis, But also renders the atheistic hypothesis quite highly probable. (...)
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  41.  85
    On Vindicating Induction.Wesley C. Salmon - 1963 - Philosophy of Science 30 (3):252-261.
    This paper deals with the problem of vindicating a particular type of inductive rule, a rule to govern inferences from observed frequencies to limits of relative frequencies. Reichenbach's rule of induction is defended. By application of two conditions, normalizing conditions and a criterion of linguistic invariance, it is argued that alternative rules lead to contradiction. It is then argued that the rule of induction does not lead to contradiction when suitable restrictions are placed upon the predicates admitted. Goodman's grue-bleen paradox (...)
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  42.  74
    Philosopher in a Physics Course.Wesley C. Salmon - 1977 - Teaching Philosophy 2 (2):133-140.
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  43.  61
    Objectively Homogeneous Reference Classes.Wesley C. Salmon - 1977 - Synthese 36 (4):399 - 414.
  44. Unfinished Business: The Problem of Induction.Wesley C. Salmon - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 33 (1):1 - 19.
  45.  49
    The Philosophical Significance of the One-Way Speed of Light.Wesley C. Salmon - 1977 - Noûs 11 (3):253-292.
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  46. Causal Propensities: Statistical Causality Vs. Aleatory Causality.Wesley C. Salmon - 1990 - Topoi 9 (2):95-100.
  47. The Pragmatic Justification of Induction.Wesley Salmon - 1974 - In Richard Swinburne (ed.), The Justification of Induction. New York]Oxford University Press. pp. 85--97.
     
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  48. Conflicting Conceptions of Scientific Explanation.Wesley C. Salmon - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (11):651-654.
  49.  6
    Causation (Oxford Readings in Philosophy).Wesley C. Salmon - 1980 - Oxford Up.
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  50.  78
    The Uniformity of Nature.Wesley C. Salmon - 1953 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 14 (1):39-48.
    The principle of uniformity of nature has sometimes been invoked for the purpose of justifying induction. This principle cannot be established "a priori", And in the absence of a justification of induction, It cannot be established "a posteriori". There is no justification for assuming it as a postulate of science. Use of such a principle is, However, Neither sufficient nor necessary for a justification of induction. In any plausible form, It is too weak for that purpose, And hence, It is (...)
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