Results for 'Whigs'

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  1.  28
    Whigs and Stories: Herbert Butterfield and the Historiography of Science.Nicholas Jardine - 2003 - History of Science 41 (1):125--40.
  2.  6
    Whigs and Stories: Herbert Butterfield and the Historiography of Science.Nick Jardine - 2003 - History of Science 41 (2):125-140.
  3.  40
    Whigs and Liberals.Joseph Hamburger - 1989 - Utilitas 1 (2):300.
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  4.  5
    " Scientific Whigs"?: Scottish Historians on the French Revolution.Anna Plassart - 2013 - Journal of the History of Ideas 74 (1):93-114.
  5.  8
    Philosophic Whigs: Medicine, Science, and Citizenship in Edinburgh, 1789-1848. L. S. Jacyna.Lisa Rosner - 1995 - Isis 86 (4):653-654.
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  6.  41
    Towards a Critical Philosophy of Science: Continental Beginnings and Bugbears, Whigs, and Waterbears.Babette Babich - 2010 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (4):343-391.
    Continental philosophy of science has developed alongside mainstream analytic philosophy of science. But where continental approaches are inclusive, analytic philosophies of science are not?excluding not merely Nietzsche?s philosophy of science but Gödel?s philosophy of physics. As a radicalization of Kant, Nietzsche?s critical philosophy of science puts science in question and Nietzsche?s critique of the methodological foundations of classical philology bears on science, particularly evolution as well as style (in art and science). In addition to the critical (in Mach, Nietzsche, Heidegger (...)
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  7. Locke, Levelers and Liberty-Property and Democracy in the Thought of the 1st Whigs.David McNally - 1989 - History of Political Thought 10 (1):17-40.
  8.  2
    Calvin and the Whigs: A Study in Historical Political Theology, Written by Ruben Alvarado.Simon P. Kennedy - 2018 - Philosophia Reformata 83 (1):141-142.
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  9.  14
    The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh 1737–1747.Roger L. Emerson - 1979 - British Journal for the History of Science 12 (2):154-191.
    Several essays, articles, and papers have appeared during the last fifteen years which have shed light on the place and function of science in the intellectual life of eighteenth-century Scotland. Some have concentrated on ideological factors such as the increasing concerns with polite culture, improvement, and the reaction of the Scottish élite to the Act of Union. Others have noted the roles of Jacobites and Whigs in the production of a culture which was unique to Scotland. The generalist educational (...)
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  10.  55
    The Feminist Revelation.Christina Sommers - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (1):141.
    In the Proceedings of the American Philosophical Association for the fall of 1988, we find the view that “the power of philosophy lies in its radicalness.” The author, Tom Foster Digby, tells us that in our own day “the radical potency of philosophy is particularly well-illustrated by contemporary feminist philosophy” in ways that “could eventually reorder human life.” The claim that philosophy is essentially radical has deep historical roots. Aristotle and Plato each created a distinctive style of social philosophy. Following (...)
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  11. „The A. B. C. of Politicks“: Entstehungskontext und Rezeption von Lockes Zwei Abhandlungen über die Regierung.Michaela Rehm - 2012 - In Michaela Rehm & Bernd Ludwig (eds.), John Locke: „Zwei Abhandlungen über die Regierung“. Akademie Verlag. pp. 1-16.
    The paper is devoted to demonstrating the systematic value of the “Two Treatises of Government”. Even though their genesis is rooted in the political circumstances of Locke’s life-time, the “Treatises” are not simply a pamphlet designed to support the Whig cause, as Locke’s political ideas are derived from his theoretical philosophy and from his concept of natural law.
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  12.  19
    The Scottish Enlightenment and the End of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh.Roger L. Emerson - 1988 - British Journal for the History of Science 21 (1):33-66.
    The story of the end of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh in 1783, is linked with that of the founding of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland and the Royal Society of Edinburgh , both of which were given Royal Charters sealed on 6 May 1783. It is a story which has been admirably told by Steven Shapin. He persuasively argued that the P.S.E. was a casualty of bitter quarrels rooted in local Edinburgh politics, in personal animosities and in disputes (...)
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  13.  46
    In Search of the Chemical Revolution: Interpretive Strategies in the History of Chemistry.John G. McEvoy - 2000 - Foundations of Chemistry 2 (1):47-73.
    In recent years the Chemical Revolution has become a renewed focus of interest among historians of science. This interest isshaped by interpretive strategies associated with the emergence anddevelopment of the discipline of the history of science. The disciplineoccupies a contested intellectual terrain formed in part by thedevelopment and cultural entanglements of science itself. Threestages in this development are analyzed in this paper. Theinterpretive strategies that characterized each stage are elucidatedand traced to the disciplinary interests that gave rise to them. Whilepositivists (...)
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  14. The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke; Volume Iii: Party, Parliament, and the American War 1774-1780.Edmund Burke - 1996 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This volume of The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke continues the story of Edmund Burke, the Rockingham party in British politics, and the American crisis. By 1774 Burke was already recognized as a master of parliamentary debate and an accomplished writer. By 1780, however, his reputation was to have risen substantially. Probably the most important single reason was his Speech on Conciliation with America, which was presented to the House of Commons in March 1775, published, and circulated to a (...)
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  15.  10
    Hume Crítico de Locke: Contrato Social E Whiggism.Eveline Hauck - 2017 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 58 (136):87-100.
    RESUMO A crítica de Hume ao contrato social admite um alcance para além do debate com o contratualismo de Locke: nosso autor tem em vista, sobretudo, desconstruir os princípios filosóficos que são a base da prática política dos Whigs. Uma vez que o contrato original organiza esses princípios, Hume se dedicará a analisá-lo em termos filosóficos e históricos, na tentativa de modernizar o pensamento político de sua época. ABSTRACT Hume's criticism of the social contract allows a range beyond the (...)
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  16. Edmund Burke in America: The Contested Career of the Father of Modern Conservatism.Drew Maciag - 2013 - Cornell University Press.
    Introduction : a search for icons -- Burke in brief : a "philosophical" primer -- Old seeds, new soil : the land of Paine -- John and J.Q. Adams : federalist persuasions -- Democratic America : the ethos of liberalism -- American Whigs : a conservative response -- The Gilded Age : eclectic interpretations -- Theodore Roosevelt : blazing forward, looking backward -- Woodrow Wilson : confronting American maturity -- Modern times : conjunctions and consensus -- Natural law : (...)
     
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  17.  5
    Hume as an Ami de la Liberté: The Reception of His “Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth”.Ryu Susato - 2016 - Modern Intellectual History 13 (3):569-596.
    Despite the recent boom in research on the reception and influence of Hume's writings, most scholars have overlooked the fact that his enigmatic essay “Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth,” published in thePolitical Discoursesin 1752, not only attracted the attention of some French intellectuals before and after the Revolution, but was also taken seriously by a significant number of radicals—such as Paine, Price, Godwin, Wollstonecraft—and other reform-minded Whigs—such as James Mackintosh. Although the influence of Hume's plan onThe Federalist, No 10, (...)
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  18.  3
    Ridicule, Censorship, and the Regulation of Public Speech: The Case of Shaftesbury.Ross Carroll - 2018 - Modern Intellectual History 15 (2):353-380.
    The Third Earl of Shaftesbury has been celebrated for his commitment to free public discourse regulated only by standards of politeness, a commitment exemplified by his defence of the freedom to ridicule. This article complicates this picture by tracing Shaftesbury's response to the early eighteenth-century crisis of public speech precipitated by the demise of pre-publication censorship and growing uncertainty about intellectual property in the print trade. Shaftesbury, the article shows, was a determined opponent of pre-publication censorship through licensing, but he (...)
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  19.  2
    Constructing ‘Englishness’ and Promoting ‘Politeness’ Through a ‘Francophobic’ Bestseller: Télémaque in England.Aris Della Fontana - 2020 - History of European Ideas 46 (6):766-792.
    ABSTRACT This article draws attention to the reception that François Fénelon's Télémaque received in England in the first half of the eighteenth century. It overturns the historiographical assumption that the Jacobites were the leading disseminators of this continental bestseller on the other side of the Channel. Even though in the English intellectual context Télémaque's framework was unorthodox, many staunch supporters of the Glorious Revolution were fascinated by the book's portrayal of a virtuous king who respects laws, rights and liberties, and (...)
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  20.  7
    Augustan Politics and English Historiography: The Debate on the English Past, 1730-35.Isaac Kramnick - 1967 - History and Theory 6 (1):33.
    Bolingbroke, a Tory, adopted Whig history and stressed the ancient constitution and the age-old heritage of Commons and freedom in England in order to show that people were less free under Walpole than they had been in ancient times. Walpole, a Whig, made Brady and Tory history respectable to counter this partisan use of history. Walpole said that Commons developed as a result of feudal obligation; freedom began with the Glorious Revolution and was based on Locke's natural rights as supported (...)
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  21.  17
    John Locke on Inference and Fallacy, A Re-Appraisal.Mark Garrett Longaker - 2014 - Informal Logic 34 (4):364-392.
    John Locke, long associated with the “standard” approach to fallacies and the “logical” approach to valid inference, had both logical and dialectical reasons for favoring certain proofs and denigrating others. While the logical approach to argumentation stands forth in Locke’s philosophical writings, a dialectical approach can be found in his contributions to public controversies regarding religion and toleration. Understanding Locke’s dialectical approach to argumentation not only makes his work more relevant to the contemporary discipline of informal logic, but this understanding (...)
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  22.  6
    Thomas Carlyle's Calvinist Dialogue with the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press.Joanna Malecka - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):15-32.
    ABSTRACTThis article signals at a dearth of critical engagement with Thomas Carlyle's Presbyterian heritage resulting from the received whiggish narrative of his Calvinism as unenlightened, anachronistic, and backward-looking. It proceeds to challenge this view by examining closely Carlyle's creative use of key Calvinist concepts in his cosmopolitan and enlightened dialogue with the contemporary periodical press over British and European cultures. Carlyle is shown to be an adept purveyor both of the Edinburgh Magazine's enlightened idiom and of Blackwood's morally conservative and (...)
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  23.  15
    Political Economy to the Fore: Burke, Malthus and the Whig Response to Popular Radicalism in the Age of the French Revolution.D. McNally - 2000 - History of Political Thought 21 (3):427-448.
    In the face of new forms of popular radicalism in the 1790s, British Whigs turned increasingly hostile to the French Revolution and doctrines of radical social improvement. Yet, rather than turn to Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France to frame their anti-radical arguments, Whiggism took up the claims of Thomas Malthus' Essay on the Principle of Population. By eschewing the voluntarist idiom of Burke's Reflections in favour of a Newtonian rhetoric which resonated with the discursive traditions of radicalism (...)
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  24.  7
    ‘Barons’ Wars, Under Other Names’: Feudalism, Royalism and the American Founding.Eric Nelson - 2017 - History of European Ideas 43 (2):198-214.
    SUMMARYThe Machiavellian Moment was largely responsible for establishing what remains the dominant understanding of American Revolutionary ideology. Patriots, on this account, were radical whigs; their great preoccupation was a terror of crown power and executive corruption. This essay proposes to test the whig reading of patriot political thought in a manner suggested by Professor Pocock's pioneering first book, The Ancient Constitution and the Feudal Law. The whig tradition, as he taught us, located in the remote Saxon past an ‘ancient (...)
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  25.  6
    Unrepentant "Old" Whig.James M. Rebanks - 2000 - Journal des Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 10 (4).
    En post-scriptum de la Constitution de la Liberté, Friedrich Hayek situa le coeur de ses convictions où il perçut qu’était leur place dans l’histoire des idées. Il était, il insistait, “simplement un vieux Whig impénitent”, en insistant sur le “vieux”. Le Whiggisme, il venait de le soutenir, était le nom du seul et unique courant de pensée qui s’opposa sérieusement à tout pouvoir arbitraire. En mettant en avant le fait que le “vrai libéralisme” n’avait pas de nom reconnaissable afin de (...)
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