Results for 'Will Broadhead'

999 found
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  1.  39
    Right to Be Punished?Adriana Placani & Stearns Broadhead - 2020 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 16 (1):53-74.
    It appears at least intuitively appropriate to claim that we owe it to victims to punish those who have wronged them. It also seems plausible to state that we owe it to society to punish those who have violated its norms. However, do we also owe punishment to perpetrators themselves? In other words, do those who commit crimes have a moral right to be punished? This work examines the sustainability of the right to be punished from the standpoint of the (...)
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  2.  6
    A Blueprint for the Good Teacher? The HMI/des Model of Good Primary Practice.Pat Broadhead - 1987 - British Journal of Educational Studies 35 (1):57-71.
  3.  18
    Aeschylus, Persae 321.H. D. Broadhead - 1947 - The Classical Review 61 (02):49-.
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  4.  16
    Aeschylus, Persae 320–2.H. D. Broadhead - 1946 - The Classical Review 60 (01):4-5.
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  5.  18
    Child Care and Preschool Development: Institutional Perspectives ‐ By Kirsten Scheiwe and Harry Willekens.Pat Broadhead - 2009 - British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (4):435-436.
  6.  13
    Cicero, De Oratore, I. 225.H. D. Broadhead - 1925 - The Classical Review 39 (5-6):117-.
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  7.  4
    Factors of Gross Motor Performance in Special Education.Geoffrey D. Broadhead - 1975 - Journal of Biosocial Science 7 (1):57-65.
  8.  65
    Harald Hagendahl: La prose métrique d'arnobe. Contributions à la connaissance de la prose littéraire de ľEmpire. Pp. xi + 265. (Göteborgs Högskolas Årsskrift XLII, 1936: 1.) Göteborg: Wettergren och Kerber, 1936. Paper, Kr. 10. [REVIEW]H. D. Broadhead - 1938 - The Classical Review 52 (04):148-.
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  9.  37
    Latin Prose Rhythm État Actuel des Etudes Sur le Rythme de la Prose Latine. By Fr. Novotny, Professor at the University of Brno, Czecho-Slovakia. Pp. Vii + 95. (Eus Supplementa, Vol. 5.) Published at Lwów (and Paris, Bd. Raspail 95), 1929. Paper, 10 Fr. [REVIEW]H. D. Broadhead - 1929 - The Classical Review 43 (06):226-227.
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  10.  28
    P. C. Knook: De overgang van metrisch tot rythmisch proza bij Cyprianus en Hieronymus. Pp. 90. Purmerend: Muusses, 1932. Paper. [REVIEW]H. D. Broadhead - 1936 - The Classical Review 50 (04):151-.
  11. Review: Censeurs et publicains. Economie et fiscalite dans la Rome antique. [REVIEW]W. Broadhead - 2002 - The Classical Review 52 (1):122-123.
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  12.  4
    Social Class Factors in Special Education.Geoffrey D. Broadhead - 1972 - Journal of Biosocial Science 4 (3):315-324.
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  13.  35
    'Two Cultures,' One Frontier.Lee-Anne Broadhead & Sean Howard - 2011 - Techne 15 (1):23-35.
    This paper approaches the ‘Drexler-Smalley’ debate on nanotechnology from a neglected angle – the common denominator of ‘the frontier’ as a metaphor for scientific exploration. For Bensaude-Vincent, the debate exemplifies the clash of ‘two cultures’ – the ‘artificialist’ and biomimetic’ schools. For us, the portrayal of nanosphere as ‘new frontier’ stymies the prospect of genuine inter-cultural debate on the direction of molecular engineering. Drawing on Brandon, the‘dominium’ impulse of European imperialism is contrasted to the ‘communitas’ tradition of Native America. Proposing (...)
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  14.  15
    Plautus, Menaechmi III. Iii. 2.H. D. Broadhead - 1930 - The Classical Review 44 (1):12-12.
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  15.  21
    A Vision for Universal Pre‐School Education ‐ by Edward Zigler, Walter S. Gilliam and Stephanie M. Jones.Pat Broadhead - 2007 - British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (2):227-229.
  16. Working with Children and Young People: Ethical Debates and Practices Across Disciplines and Continents.Anne Campbell, Pat Broadhead & Avril Brock (eds.) - 2010 - Peter Lang.
     
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  17.  7
    Tragica: Elucidations of Passages in Greek Tragedy. [REVIEW]P. T. Stevens & H. D. Broadhead - 1971 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 91:146-147.
  18.  33
    Subjective Correlates and Consequences of Belief in Free Will.A. Will Crescioni, Roy F. Baumeister, Sarah E. Ainsworth, Michael Ent & Nathaniel M. Lambert - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (1):41-63.
    Four studies measured or manipulated beliefs in free will to illuminate how such beliefs are linked to other aspects of personality. Study 1 showed that stronger belief in free will was correlated with more gratitude, greater life satisfaction, lower levels of perceived life stress, a greater sense of self-efficacy, greater perceived meaning in life, higher commitment in relationships, and more willingness to forgive relationship partners. Study 2 showed that the belief in free will was a stronger predictor (...)
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  19.  7
    Index locorum.E. A. Barber, J. Barns, H. D. Broadhead, A. M. Dale, D. Daube, K. J. Dover, J. A. Faris, P. Fraser, A. Hudson-Williams & F. Jacoby - unknown - Diogenes 8 (284-6):30.
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  20.  8
    The Persae.A. D. Fitton Brown, Aeschylus & H. D. Broadhead - 1964 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 84:164-165.
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  21.  49
    Some Class-Books 1 W. W. Ewbank: First Year Latin. Pp. Xviii + 234. London: Longmans, 1936. Cloth, 2s. Gd. 2 Dora Pym: Salve Per Saecula. Pp. 109. London: Harrap, 1936. Cloth, 2S. 3 M. Kean: Penultima Latina. Pp. Viii + 108. London: Blackie, 1936. Cloth, Is. 3d. 4 C. M. Fiddian: A First Latin Course. Pp. Xii + 180. London: Martin Hopkinson, 1936. Cloth, 3s. 5 L. W. P. Lewis and L. M. Styler: A Book of Latin Translation. Pp. Viii + 239. London: Heinemann, 1937. Cloth, 3s. 6 H. D. Broadhead: Exules Siberiani. Pp. 47. Auckland and London: Whitcombe and Tombs, 1932. Paper. [REVIEW]J. T. Christie - 1937 - The Classical Review 51 (02):82-83.
  22.  28
    Latin Prose Rhythm Latin Prose Rhythm. By H. D. Broadhead. Pp. 137. Cambridge : Deighton, Bell and Co., 1922. 15s.Albert C. Clark - 1923 - The Classical Review 37 (7-8):178-181.
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  23.  39
    A Limited Kind of Freedom: Hegel's Logical Analysis of the Finitude of the Will.Will Dudley - 2000 - The Owl of Minerva 31 (2):173-198.
  24. Free Will and Luck.Alfred R. Mele - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Mele's ultimate purpose in this book is to help readers think more clearly about free will. He identifies and makes vivid the most important conceptual obstacles to justified belief in the existence of free will and meets them head on. Mele clarifies the central issues in the philosophical debate about free will and moral responsibility, criticizes various influential contemporary theories about free will, and develops two overlapping conceptions of free will--one for readers who are convinced (...)
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  25. Free Will, Determinism, and the Possibility of Doing Otherwise.Christian List - 2014 - Noûs 48 (1):156-178.
    I argue that free will and determinism are compatible, even when we take free will to require the ability to do otherwise and even when we interpret that ability modally, as the possibility of doing otherwise, and not just conditionally or dispositionally. My argument draws on a distinction between physical and agential possibility. Although in a deterministic world only one future sequence of events is physically possible for each state of the world, the more coarsely defined state of (...)
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  26. Free Will.Timothy O'Connor & Christopher Evan Franklin - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    “Free Will” is a philosophical term of art for a particular sort of capacity of rational agents to choose a course of action from among various alternatives. Which sort is the free will sort is what all the fuss is about. (And what a fuss it has been: philosophers have debated this question for over two millenia, and just about every major philosopher has had something to say about it.) Most philosophers suppose that the concept of free (...) is very closely connected to the concept of moral responsibility. Acting with free will, on such views, is just to satisfy the metaphysical requirement on being responsible for one's action. (Clearly, there will also be epistemic conditions on responsibility as well, such as being aware—or failing that, being culpably unaware—of relevant alternatives to one's action and of the alternatives' moral significance.) But the significance of free will is not exhausted by its connection to moral responsibility. Free will also appears to be a condition on desert for one's accomplishments (why sustained effort and creative work are praiseworthy); on the autonomy and dignity of persons; and on the value we accord to love and friendship. (See Kane 1996, 81ff. and Clarke 2003, Ch.1.). (shrink)
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  27. Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life.Derk Pereboom - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Derk Pereboom articulates and defends an original, forward-looking conception of moral responsibility. He argues that although we may not possess the kind of free will that is normally considered necessary for moral responsibility, this does not jeopardize our sense of ourselves as agents, or a robust sense of achievement and meaning in life.
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  28. Free Will and Determinism.On Free Will, Bio-Cultural Evolution Hans Fink, Niels Henrik Gregersen & Problem Torben Bo Jansen - 1991 - Zygon 26 (3):447.
  29. Free Will Skepticism and Criminal Behavior: A Public Health-Quarantine Model.Gregg D. Caruso - 2016 - Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (1):25-48.
    One of the most frequently voiced criticisms of free will skepticism is that it is unable to adequately deal with criminal behavior and that the responses it would permit as justified are insufficient for acceptable social policy. This concern is fueled by two factors. The first is that one of the most prominent justifications for punishing criminals, retributivism, is incompatible with free will skepticism. The second concern is that alternative justifications that are not ruled out by the skeptical (...)
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  30. Free Will Remains a Mystery.Peter van Inwagen - 2000 - Philosophical Perspectives 14:1-20.
    This paper has two parts. In the first part, I concede an error in an argument I have given for the incompatibility of free will and determinism. I go on to show how to modify my argument so as to avoid this error, and conclude that the thesis that free will and determinism are compatible continues to be—to say the least—implausible. But if free will is incompatible with determinism, we are faced with a mystery, for free (...) undeniably exists, and it also seems to be incompatible with indeterminism. In the second part of this paper, I will defend the conclusion that the concept of agent causation is of no use to the philosopher who wants to maintain that free will and indeterminism are compatible. I conclude that free will remains a mystery---that is, that free will undeniably exists and that there is a strong and unanswered prima facie case for its impossibility. (shrink)
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  31.  79
    Free Will.Sam Harris - 2012 - Free Press.
    A BELIEF IN FREE WILL touches nearly everything that human beings value. It is difficult to think about law, politics, religion, public policy, intimate relationships, morality—as well as feelings of remorse or personal achievement—without first imagining that every person is the true source of his or her thoughts and actions. And yet the facts tell us that free will is an illusion. In this enlightening book, Sam Harris argues that this truth about the human mind does not undermine (...)
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  32. Free Will as an Open Scientific Problem.Mark Balaguer - 2010 - MIT Press, Bradford.
    In this largely antimetaphysical treatment of free will and determinism, Mark Balaguer argues that the philosophical problem of free will boils down to an open scientific question about the causal histories of certain kinds of neural events. In the course of his argument, Balaguer provides a naturalistic defense of the libertarian view of free will. The metaphysical component of the problem of free will, Balaguer argues, essentially boils down to the question of whether humans possess libertarian (...)
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  33.  68
    Free Will and Epistemology: A Defence of the Transcendental Argument for Freedom.Robert Lockie - 2018 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This is a work concerned with justification and freedom and the relationship between these. Its summational aim is to defend a transcendental argument for free will – that we could not be epistemically justified in undermining a strong notion of free will, as a strong notion of free will would be required for any such process of undermining to be itself epistemically justified. The book advances two transcendental arguments – for a deontically internalist conception of epistemic justification (...)
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  34. Free Will and Illusion.Saul Smilansky - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    Saul Smilansky presents an original new approach to the problem of free will, which lies at the heart of morality and self-understanding. He maintains that the key to the problem is the role played by illusion. Smilansky boldly claims that we could not live adequately with a complete awareness of the truth about human freedom and that illusion lies at the center of the human condition.
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  35. Free Will and Consciousness: A Determinist Account of the Illusion of Free Will.Gregg Caruso - 2012 - Lexington Books.
    This book argues two main things: The first is that there is no such thing as free will—at least not in the sense most ordinary folk take to be central or fundamental; the second is that the strong and pervasive belief in free will can be accounted for through a careful analysis of our phenomenology and a proper theoretical understanding of consciousness.
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  36. Free Will as Involving Determination and Inconceivable Without It.R. E. Hobart - 1934 - Mind 43 (169):1-27.
    The thesis of this article is that there has never been any ground for the controversy between the doctrine of free will and determinism, that it is based upon a misapprehension, that the two assertions are entirely consistent, that one of them strictly implies the other, that they have been opposed only because of our natural want of the analytical imagination. In so saying I do not tamper with the meaning of either phrase. That would be unpardonable. I mean (...)
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  37. Contemporary Political Philosophy: An Introduction.Will Kymlicka (ed.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    This new edition of Will Kymlicka's best selling critical introduction to contemporary political theory has been fully revised to include many of the most significant developments in Anglo-American political philosophy in the last eleven years, particularly the new debates over issues of democratic citizenship and cultural pluralism. The book now includes two new chapters on citizenship theory and multiculturalism, in addition to updated chapters on utilitarianism, liberal egalitarianism, libertarianism, socialism, communitarianism, and feminism. The many thinkers discussed include G. A. (...)
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  38. Free Will, Self‐Creation, and the Paradox of Moral Luck.Kristin M. Mickelson - 2019 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 43 (1):224-256.
    How is the problem of free will related to the problem of moral luck? In this essay, I answer that question and outline a new solution to the paradox of moral luck, the source-paradox solution. This solution both explains why the paradox arises and why moral luck does not exist. To make my case, I highlight a few key connections between the paradox of moral luck and two related problems, namely the problem of free will and determinism and (...)
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  39. Free Will.Gary Watson (ed.) - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    The new edition of this highly successful text will once again provide the ideal introduction to free will. This volume brings together some of the most influential contributions to the topic of free will during the past 50 years, as well as some notable recent work.
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  40.  87
    Free Will and Values.Robert Kane - 1985 - State University of New York Press.
    _A philosophical analysis of free will and the relativity of values._.
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  41. Free Will and Luck: Reply to Critics.Alfred R. Mele - 2007 - Philosophical Explorations 10 (2):153 – 155.
    Mele's ultimate purpose in this book is to help readers think more clearly about free will. He identifies and makes vivid the most important conceptual obstacles to justified belief in the existence of free will and meets them head on. Mele clarifies the central issues in the philosophical debate about free will and moral responsibility, criticizes various influential contemporary theories about free will, and develops two overlapping conceptions of free will--one for readers who are convinced (...)
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  42.  44
    The Will: A Dual Aspect Theory.Brian O'Shaughnessy - 1980 - Cambridge University Press.
    The phenomenon of action in which the mind moves the body has puzzled philosophers over the centuries. In this new edition of a classic work of analytical philosophy, Brian O'Shaughnessy investigates bodily action and attempts to resolve some of the main problems. His expanded and updated discussion examines the scope of the will and the conditions in which it makes contact with the body, and investigates the epistemology of the body. He sheds light upon the strangely intimate relation of (...)
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  43. Free Will: A Philosophical Study.Laura W. Ekstrom - 1999 - Westview.
    In this comprehensive new study of human free agency, Laura Waddell Ekstrom critically surveys contemporary philosophical literature and provides a novel account of the conditions for free action. Ekstrom argues that incompatibilism concerning free will and causal determinism is true and thus the right account of the nature of free action must be indeterminist in nature. She examines a variety of libertarian approaches, ultimately defending an account relying on indeterministic causation among events and appealing to agent causation only in (...)
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  44. Free Will and Consciousness: Experimental Studies.Joshua Shepherd - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):915-927.
    What are the folk-conceptual connections between free will and consciousness? In this paper I present results which indicate that consciousness plays central roles in folk conceptions of free will. When conscious states cause behavior, people tend to judge that the agent acted freely. And when unconscious states cause behavior, people tend to judge that the agent did not act freely. Further, these studies contribute to recent experimental work on folk philosophical affiliation, which analyzes folk responses to determine whether (...)
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  45. Free Will: A Very Short Introduction.Thomas Pink - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Every day we seem to make and act upon all kinds of free choices: some trivial, others so consequential that they change the course of one's life, or even the course of history. But are these choices really free, or are we compelled to act the way we do by factors beyond our control? Is the feeling that we could have made different decisions just an illusion? And if our choices are not free, is it legitimate to hold people morally (...)
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  46. Living Without Free Will.Derk Pereboom - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Most people assume that, even though some degenerative or criminal behavior may be caused by influences beyond our control, ordinary human actions are not similarly generated, but rather are freely chosen, and we can be praiseworthy or blameworthy for them. A less popular and more radical claim is that factors beyond our control produce all of the actions we perform. It is this hard determinist stance that Derk Pereboom articulates in Living Without Free Will. Pereboom argues that our best (...)
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  47. Free Will Skepticism and Its Implications: An Argument for Optimism.Gregg Caruso - 2019 - In Elizabeth Shaw (ed.), Free Will Skepticism in Law and Society. New York: pp. 43-72.
  48. Free Will and Mental Quausation.Sara Bernstein & Jessica Wilson - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (2):310-331.
    Free will, if such there be, involves free choosing: the ability to mentally choose an outcome, where the outcome is 'free' in being, in some substantive sense, up to the agent of the choice. As such, it is clear that the questions of how to understand free will and mental causation are connected, for events of seemingly free choosing are mental events that appear to be efficacious vis-a-vis other mental events as well as physical events. Nonetheless, the free (...)
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  49. Liberalism, Community, and Culture.Will Kymlicka - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    in a very different sense, to refer to the cultural community, or cultural structure, itself On this view, the cultural community continues to exist even when its members arc free to modify the character of the culture, should they find its traditional ...
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  50.  4
    The Book Report: Will Schwalbe.Will Schwalbe - 2017 - The Chesterton Review 43 (1/2):308-310.
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