Results for 'Will Philosophy'

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  1. Experimental Philosophy and the Compatibility of Free Will and Determinism: A Survey.Florian Cova & Yasuko Kitano - 2014 - Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 22:17-37.
    The debate over whether free will and determinism are compatible is controversial, and produces wide scholarly discussion. This paper argues that recent studies in experimental philosophy suggest that people are in fact “natural compatibilists”. To support this claim, it surveys the experimental literature bearing directly or indirectly upon this issue, before pointing to three possible limitations of this claim. However, notwithstanding these limitations, the investigation concludes that the existing empirical evidence seems to support the view that most people (...)
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  2. Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy.A. Harris James - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar (...)
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  3. On the Will in Nature: A Discussion of the Corroborations From the Empirical Sciences That the Author's Philosophy has Received Since its First Appearance.Arthur Schopenhauer - 1992 - Distributed in the U.S.A. And Canada by St. Martin's Press.
     
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  4. Theories of the Will in the History of Philosophy.Archibald Alexander - 1899 - Philosophical Review 8 (1):60-63.
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  5. Hegel's Philosophy of Mind and Will.Patrick T. Murray - 1991
     
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  6. Philosophy and the Folk: On Some Implications of Experimental Work For Philosophical Debates on Free Will.Manuel Vargas - 2006 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 6 (1):239-254.
    I discuss experimental work by Nichols, and Nichols and Knobe, with respect to the philosophical problems of free will and moral responsibility. I mention some methodological concerns about the work, but focus principally on the philosophical implications of the work. The experimental results seem to show that in particular, concrete cases we are more willing to attribute responsibility than in cases described abstractly or in general terms. I argue that their results suggest a deep problem for traditional accounts of (...)
     
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  7.  30
    Surrounding Free Will: Philosophy, Psychology, Neuroscience.Alfred R. Mele (ed.) - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    This cutting-edge volume showcases work supported by a four-year, 4.4 million dollar project on free will and science. In fourteen new articles and an introduction, contributors explore the subject of free will from the perspectives of neuroscience; social, cognitive, and developmental psychology; and philosophy.
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  8.  13
    Divine Will and the Mechanical Philosophy: Gassendi and Descartes on Contingency and Necessity in the Created World.Margaret J. Osler - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about the influence of varying theological conceptions of contingency and necessity on two versions of the mechanical philosophy in the seventeenth century. Pierre Gassendi and René Descartes both believed that all natural phenomena could be explained in terms of matter and motion alone. They disagreed about the details of their mechanical accounts of the world, in particular about their theories of matter and their approaches to scientific method. This book traces their differences back to theological presuppositions (...)
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  9. Surrounding Free Will: Philosophy, Psychology, Neuroscience.Alfred R. Mele (ed.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This volume showcases cutting-edge scholarship from The Big Questions in Free Will project, funded by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation and directed by Alfred R. Mele. It explores the subject of free will from the perspectives of neuroscience; social, cognitive, and developmental psychology; and philosophy. The volume consists of fourteen new articles and an introduction from top-ranked contributors, all of whom bring fresh perspectives to the question of free will. They investigate questions such as: (...)
     
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  10.  82
    On Free Will and on the Nature of Philosophy.Hanoch Ben-Yami - 2015 - Iyyun 64:89-96.
  11.  82
    Free Will and Experimental Philosophy: An Intervetion.Tamler Sommers - manuscript
  12. The Problem of Free-Will in Recent Philosophy.Arthur Berndtson - 1942 - Chicago: Ill..
     
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  13. Determinism and Free Will in Stoic Philosophy.Susanne Bobzien - 1993
  14.  39
    The Idea of Will and Organic Evolution in Bergson's Philosophy of Life.Wahida Khandker - 2013 - Continental Philosophy Review 46 (1):57-74.
    The idea of the élan vital is crucial for an understanding of Bergson’s metaphysical method, underpinning the way in which philosophy stands with other forms of creative activity as an endeavour of “self-overcoming,” the self or subject no longer being at the centre of thought, but understood rather as a product of the process of thinking. In placing a special emphasis on Bergson’s 1907 work, Creative Evolution, the present essay is both an acknowledgement and challenge to the shift from (...)
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  15.  22
    What Will XXth Century Philosophy Carry Over Into the XXIst.Zbigniew Wendland - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 11:137-142.
    The paper centers on philosophy's major trends and trials at the turn of the XXt h and XXIs t century, its leading idea is based on several basic assumptions which can be summarized as follows: 1) the title is a query after XXt h-century philosophy's main achievements and their usefulness in the XXIs t ; 2) speaking about philosophy's achievements, the author particularly means its critical role in condemning and de-mystifying evil, dispelling illusion and myth, and disclosing (...)
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  16.  32
    Schopenhauer's Philosophy of Will and Sankara's Advaita Vedanta.Arati Barua - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:23-29.
    It is a well established fact that Arthur Schopenhauer was the first major Western thinker who was so much influenced by the Upanishads that he wrote, "In the whole world there is no study so beneficial and so elevating as that of the Upanishads. It has been the solace of my life, it will be the solace of my death”. This view of Schopenhauer about the Upanishads not only shows his familiarity with the Eastern thought but also it reflects (...)
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  17. Experimental Philosophy on Free Will: An Error Theory for Incompatibilist Intuitions.Eddy Nahmias & Dylan Murray - 2010 - In Jesus Aguilar, Andrei Buckareff & Keith Frankish (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Action. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 189--215.
    We discuss recent work in experimental philosophy on free will and moral responsibility and then present a new study. Our results suggest an error theory for incompatibilist intuitions. Most laypersons who take determinism to preclude free will and moral responsibility apparently do so because they mistakenly interpret determinism to involve fatalism or “bypassing” of agents’ relevant mental states. People who do not misunderstand determinism in this way tend to see it as compatible with free will and (...)
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  18. Experimental Philosophy and Free Will.Tamler Sommers - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (2):199-212.
    This paper develops a sympathetic critique of recent experimental work on free will and moral responsibility. Section 1 offers a brief defense of the relevance of experimental philosophy to the free will debate. Section 2 reviews a series of articles in the experimental literature that probe intuitions about the "compatibility question"—whether we can be free and morally responsible if determinism is true. Section 3 argues that these studies have produced valuable insights on the factors that influence our (...)
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  19.  46
    Applied Political Philosophy at the Rubicon: Will Kymlica's Multicultural Citizenship.A. Favell - 1998 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (2):255-278.
    Will Kymlicka's Multicultural Citizenship represents an extraordinary attempt to put applied political philosophy to work in the empirical context of contemporary political debates about immigration and ethnic minorities in western society. This paper explores the methodological and interpretative difficulties of combining normative and empirical goals, in a critical discussion of the examples Kymlicka makes of multicultural issues in France, Britain and the US. It goes on to argue that these weaknesses lie in the Rawlsian influence in Kymlicka's work, (...)
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  20. Kant and Feder on the Will, Happiness, and the Aim of Moral Philosophy.Stefano Bacin - forthcoming - In Corey W. Dyck & Falk Wunderlich (eds.), Kant and His German Contemporaries. Cambridge University Press.
    The contrast between Kant’s moral philosophy and Feder’s is not less crucial than the controversy caused by the Göttingen review of the first Critique. One of main targets of Kant’s moral philosophy was Feder’s view, which can be regarded as Kant's main competitor in the contemporary debate. I thus argue that the background provided by the conflict with Feder helps see how Kant shifted the ethical debate in new directions. I present an assessment of the philosophical substance of (...)
     
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  21.  7
    The Will to Create: Goethe's Philosophy of Nature.Astrida Orle Tantillo - 2002 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
    Better known as a poet and dramatist, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was also a learned philosopher and natural scientist. Astrida Orle Tantillo offers the first comprehensive analysis of his natural philosophy, which she contends is rooted in creativity. Tantillo analyzes Goethe’s main scientific texts, including his work on physics, botany, comparative anatomy, and metereology. She critically examines his attempts to challenge the basic tenets of Newtonian and Cartesian science and to found a new natural philosophy. In individual chapters (...)
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  22. Descartes's Ballet: His Doctrine of the Will and His Political Philosophy.Richard A. Watson - 2007 - St. Augustine's Press.
    Transcript and English translation of La naissance de la paix -- Analysis of La naissance de la paix -- Did Descartes write La naissance de la paix? -- Descartes's doctrine of the will -- The power of the will -- Controlling bodily desires -- Willing the good -- The sources of willing -- Did Descartes read Corneille? -- Descartes's political philosophy -- Evidence and methods of construction -- The sovereign state -- Descartes's life and politics -- Discours (...)
     
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  23. The Invention of the Will: A Critical and Comparative-Historical Study in the Philosophy of Action and Ethics.Yang Xiao - 1999 - Dissertation, New School for Social Research
    This dissertation deals with the following three questions which will likely be classified as questions in different areas of specialization, the philosophy of action, comparative-historical studies, and ethics respectively: What is the essence of voluntary action? Do classical Chinese philosophers have the concept of voluntary action? What role does the concept of the will play in ethics? ;In this dissertation I argue for two related theses. As an answer to question 1, my first thesis is that the (...)
     
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  24. Will Philosophy Bury Its Undertakers?J. de Lucca - 1979 - Diogenes 27 (108):1-16.
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  25. Experimental Philosophy and the Problem of Free Will.Shaun Nichols - 2011 - Science 331 (6023):1401-1403.
    Many philosophical problems are rooted in everyday thought, and experimental philosophy uses social scientific techniques to study the psychological underpinnings of such problems. In the case of free will, research suggests that people in a diverse range of cultures reject determinism, but people give conflicting responses on whether determinism would undermine moral responsibility. When presented with abstract questions, people tend to maintain that determinism would undermine responsibility, but when presented with concrete cases of wrongdoing, people tend to say (...)
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  26.  16
    In the Future Philosophy Will Be Neither Continental nor Analytic but Synthetic: Toward a Promiscuous Miscegenation of (All) Philosophical Traditions and Styles.Iain Thomson - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):191-205.
    In this paper, I suggest that the important philosophy of the future will increasingly be found neither in the “continental” nor in the “analytic” traditions but, instead, in the transcending sublation of (all) traditions I call “synthetic philosophy.” I mean “synthetic” both in a sense that encourages the bold combinatorial mélange of existing styles, traditions, and issues, and also in the Hegelian sense of sublating dichotomous oppositions, appropriating the distinctive insights of both sides while eliminating their errors (...)
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  27.  23
    Hegel, Nietzsche, and Philosophy: Thinking Freedom by Will Dudley Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002, Pp. 326 + XVII. £45. [REVIEW]Thom Brooks - 2004 - Philosophy 79 (1):149-153.
    This is a book review of Will Dudley, "Hegel, Nietzsche, and Philosophy".
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  28.  1
    Interpretational Paradox, Implicit Normativity, and Human Nature: Revisiting Weakness of Will From a Perspective of Comparative Philosophy.Yujian Zheng - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (2):145-163.
    This essay critiques or engages a wide range of existing works on the ancient and well-contested issue of weakness of will, from a new perspective of comparative philosophy combined with a focus on a largely neglected Davidsonian paradox of irrationality. It aims at revealing the interplay between the descriptive and the normative in the very notion of critical interpretation, as well as a special relation between holding-true and making-true which helps to explain the non-accidentalness of the descriptive coat (...)
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  29. DURANT, WILL.-Philosophy and the Social Problem. [REVIEW]F. C. S. Schiller - 1919 - Mind 28:481.
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  30.  55
    The Philosophy of Free Will: Essential Readings From the Contemporary Debates.Paul Russell & Oisin Deery (eds.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    This collection provides a selection of the most essential contributions to the contemporary free will debate. Among the issues discussed and debated are skepticism and naturalism, alternate possibilities, the consequence argument, libertarian metaphysics, illusionism and revisionism, optimism and pessimism, neuroscience and free will, and experimental philosophy.
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  31.  9
    Will This Potato Grow?”: Ultimate Analysis and Conventional Existence in the Madhyamika Philosophy of Tsong Kha Pa Lo Sang Drak Pa’s Lam Rim Chen Mo.Guy Newland - 2001 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 12:61-72.
    In this paper, I discuss the problem of how empty persons can make distinctions between right and wrong within the two-truths doctrine of the Buddhist tradition. To do so, I rely on the teachings of the fifteenth- century founder of Tibetan Buddhism, Tsong kha pa Lo sang drak pa. I summarize Tsong kha pa’s exposition of the Buddhist tradition on this question, and then show how he held that profound emptiness, the ultimate truth found under scrupulous analysis of how things (...)
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  32.  14
    Nietzsche's Philosophy of Culture: A Paradox in the Will to Power.Frederick Olafson - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):557-572.
    I examine Nietzsche's concept of a nihilism of strength\nand the relationship in which it stands to the kind of\nvital self-assertion that he admired in archaic\naristocracies. What is new in Nietzsche's nihilism of\nstrength is a self-awareness that was lacking in the past\nand that would enable a fully autonomous human being to\nrecognize the "being" he imposes on "becoming" as the\nexpression of his own will to power. I show that this idea\nleads to serious incoherencies in Nietzsche's account of\nthis new kind of strength (...)
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  33.  1
    The Free Will Which Wills the Free Will": On Marriage as a Paradigm of Freedom in Hegel's "Philosophy of Right.D. C. Schindler - 2012 - The Owl of Minerva 44 (1/2):93-117.
    This paper aims to present Hegel’s conception of freedom—as “being at home with oneself in an other”—in simple and straightforward terms. Drawing primarily on the “Introduction” to the Philosophy of Right, in which Hegel outlines the nature of the will, and then the first part of the discussion of Sittlichkeit, in which the will finds its most concrete realization, the paper presents marriage as the paradigm of Hegel’s notion of freedom. Hegel’s abstract formulation, “the free will (...)
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  34. The Will at the Crossroads a Reconstruction of Kant's Moral Philosophy.J. Gray Cox - 1984
    This work systematically explicates and defends four key claims in Kant's moral philosophy: The human will is some form of practical reason. The supreme criterion for determining the morality of our choices is provided by an a priori moral law. We find this law to be a source of felt value; it commands unqualified respect. We must suppose the human will is free. ;Traditionally, Kant has been read as holding that these claims imply that the responsible moral (...)
     
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  35. General Will in Political Philosophy.Grygienc Janusz - 2013 - Imprint Academic.
    This book deals with the role and place of the general will in modern and contemporary political thought. This project is carried out at the crossroads of the history of ideas and political philosophy. It extensively develops historical and philosophical themes, showing modifications to the idea of the general will in the writings of thinkers who sometimes represent very distant epochs. The author tracks down the birth and the development of the idea of the general will (...)
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  36.  48
    Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy.R. Dasti Matthew & F. Bryant Edwin (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Led by Buddhists and the yoga traditions of Hinduism and Jainism, Indian thinkers have long engaged in a rigorous analysis and reconceptualization of our common notion of self. Less understood is the way in which such theories of self intersect with issues involving agency and free will; yet such intersections are profoundly important, as all major schools of Indian thought recognize that moral goodness and religious fulfillment depend on the proper understanding of personal agency. Moreover, their individual conceptions of (...)
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  37.  35
    Experimental Philosophy of Actual and Counterfactual Free Will Intuitions.Adam Feltz - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:113-130.
    Five experiments suggested that everyday free will and moral responsibility judgments about some hypothetical thought examples differed from free will and moral responsibility judgments about the actual world. Experiment 1 (N = 106) showed that free will intuitions about the actual world measured by the FAD-Plus poorly predicted free will intuitions about a hypothetical person performing a determined action (r = .13). Experiments 2–5 replicated this result and found the relations between actual free will judgments (...)
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  38.  15
    Secularism is the Will of God; an Essay in the Social Philosophy of Democracy and Religion. [REVIEW]Philip H. Phenix - 1955 - Journal of Philosophy 52 (19):523-526.
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  39.  32
    Obligation, Justice, and the Will in Hume's Moral Philosophy.Margaret Watkins Tate - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (1):93-122.
    Some scholars have recently found commonalities between Hume's motivational psychology and Kantian understandings of reason and obligation. Although this trend corrects certain misreadings of Hume, it goes too far in other respects. This essay argues that we can understand Hume's explanation of the artificial virtue of justice in a way that avoids such mistakes. I begin by considering Stephen Darwall's argument that features of Hume's account of justice reveal an inadequacy in the empirical naturalist tradition and underlying commitments to the (...)
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  40.  18
    Nietzche\'s Philosophy of the Will to Power a Kind of Elan Vital and Creative Expression.Hope K. Fitz - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (5-6):43-54.
    In this paper I argue that, for Nietzsche, the will to power is a kind of élan vital, i.e., vital impulse, force or drive. In living creatures, it is a drive to express their natures. In human beings, it is complex and must be developed in stages. The initial stages include becoming independent and striving for freedom of spirit and expression. Of the few that achieve the last stage, some will become the Übermensch or superior persons who (...) achieve great creative acts and in so doing enhance the capabilities of all humans. Nietzsche spoke as if he were one of the free spirits, but implicit in his writings is the idea that he is an exemplar of the Übermensch. (shrink)
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  41.  4
    Divine Will and the Mechanical Philosophy.Richard A. Watson - 1996 - International Studies in Philosophy 28 (4):137-138.
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  42.  9
    The Status of Nietzsche's Theory of the Will to Power in the Light of Conremporary Philosophy of Science.Stephen P. Schwartz - 1993 - International Studies in Philosophy 25 (2):85-92.
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  43. Paul Ricoeur's Philosophy of the Will: The Contribution of Ricoeur's Philosophical Project to Contemporary Theological Reconstruction.Pamela Anderson - 1989 - Dissertation, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. ;The reconstruction of Paul Ricoeur's philosophical project presented in this thesis endeavours to bring together his various ideas concerning human willing in order to assess the contribution they are able to make to contemporary Christian theology. This critical assessment identifies the field of concepts and issues that comprise Ricoeur's Kantian account of willing; it also challenges his reliance on a paradoxical account of the human subject as being both (...)
     
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  44. Free Will: Critical Concepts in Philosophy.John Martin Fischer (ed.) - 2005 - Routledge.
    Over the last three decades there has been a tremendous amount of philosophical work in the Anglo-American tradition on the cluster of topics pertaining to Free Will. Of course, this work has in many instances built on and extended the historical treatments of this great area of philosophical interest. The issues range from fairly abstract philosophical questions about the logic of arguments about human freedom (and its relationship to prior predictability of our choices and actions, or God's foreknowledge, or (...)
     
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  45. Nietzsche’s Philosophy of the Will to Power as a Kind of Elan Vital and Creative Expression.Hope K. Fitz - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (5):43-53.
    In this paper I argue that, for Nietzsche, the will to power is a kind of élan vital, i.e., vital impulse, force or drive. In living creatures, it is a drive to express their natures. In human beings, it is complex and must be developed in stages. The initial stages include becoming independent and striving for freedom of spirit and expression. Of the few that achieve the last stage, some will become the Übermensch or superior persons who (...) achieve great creative acts and in so doing enhance the capabilities of all humans. Nietzsche spoke as if he were one of the free spirits, but implicit in his writings is the idea that he is an exemplar of the Übermensch. (shrink)
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  46. The Will to Doubt. An Essay in Philosophy for the General Thinker. [REVIEW]Joseph A. Leighton - 1908 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 5 (24):665-666.
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  47.  5
    Pessimism of the Intellect, Optimism of the Will: The Political Philosophy of Kai Nielsen.David Rondel & Alex Sager (eds.) - 2012 - University of Calgary Press.
    Kai Nielsen is one of Canada’s most distinguished political philosophers. In a career spanning over 40 years, he has published more than 400 papers in political philosophy, ethics, meta-philosophy, and philosophy of religion. He has engaged much of the best work in Anglophone political philosophy, shedding light on many of the central debates and controversies of our time but throughout has remained a unique voice on the political left. _ Pessimism of the Intellect _presents a thoughtful (...)
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  48.  33
    The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy.William James - 1897 - Harvard University Press.
    This is the sixth volume to be published in The Works of William James, an authoritative edition sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies.
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  49. The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. Human Immortality; Two Supposed Objections to the Doctrine.William James - 1956 - Dover Publications.
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  50. The Will to Believe: And Other Essays in Popular Philosophy.William James - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    For this 1897 publication, the American philosopher William James brought together ten essays, some of which were originally talks given to Ivy League societies. Accessible to a broader audience, these non-technical essays illustrate the author's pragmatic approach to belief and morality, arguing for faith and action in spite of uncertainty. James thought his audiences suffered 'paralysis of their native capacity for faith' while awaiting scientific grounds for belief. His response consisted in an attitude of 'radical empiricism', which deals practically rather (...)
     
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