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Willem van der Deijl [22]Willem J. A. van der Deijl [1]
  1. The sentience argument for experientialism about welfare.Willem van der Deijl - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 178 (1):187-208.
    Can a person’s degree of wellbeing be affected by things that do not enter her experience? Experientialists deny that it can, extra-experientialists affirm it. The debate between these two positions has focused on an argument against experientialism—the experience machine objection—but few arguments exist for it. I present an argument for experientialism. It builds on the claim that theories of wellbeing should not only state what constitutes wellbeing, but also which entities are welfare subjects. Moreover, the claims it makes about these (...)
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  2.  40
    Two Concepts of Meaningful Work.Willem van der Deijl - 2022 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):202-217.
    The concept of meaningful work is used to evaluate the quality of work. Typical cases of meaningless work that have been used to clarify this concept are assembly line work, and work involving other types of mindless tasks, but also David Graeber's ‘bullshit jobs’. I argue that there are at least two fundamental reasons to care about meaningful work: reasons from the wellbeing of the worker and reasons pertaining to meaningfulness of the worker's life. I first argue that a concept (...)
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  3.  67
    Can Subjectivism Account for Degrees of Wellbeing?Willem van der Deijl & Huub Brouwer - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (3):767-788.
    Wellbeing describes how good life is for the person living it. Wellbeing comes in degrees. Subjective theories of wellbeing maintain that for objects or states of affairs to benefit us, we need to have a positive attitude towards these objects or states of affairs: the Resonance Constraint. In this article, we investigate to what extent subjectivism can plausibly account for degrees of wellbeing. There is a vast literature on whether preference-satisfaction theory – one particular subjective theory – can account for (...)
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  4.  26
    Two Concepts of Meaningful Work.Willem van der Deijl - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):202-217.
    The concept of meaningful work is used to evaluate the quality of work. Typical cases of meaningless work that have been used to clarify this concept are assembly line work, and work involving other types of mindless tasks, but also David Graeber's ‘bullshit jobs’. I argue that there are at least two fundamental reasons to care about meaningful work: reasons from the wellbeing of the worker and reasons pertaining to meaningfulness of the worker's life. I first argue that a concept (...)
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  5.  60
    Are Measures of Well-Being Philosophically Adequate?Willem van der Deijl - 2017 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 47 (3):209-234.
    The concept of well-being is increasingly gaining acceptance as an object of science, and many different types of well-being measures have been developed. A debate has emerged about which measures are able to capture well-being successfully. An important underlying problem is that there is no unified conceptual framework about the nature of well-being—a hotly debated topic of philosophical discussion. I argue that while there is little agreement about the nature of well-being in philosophy, there is an important agreement on some (...)
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  6.  47
    Which Problem of Adaptation?Willem van der Deijl - 2017 - Utilitas 29 (4):474-492.
    One widespread argument against the efficacy of subjective well-being as a measure of well-being is the adaptation problem as formulated by Sen and Nussbaum: the phenomenon that people may adapt to deprivation and find satisfaction or happiness in objectively bad circumstances. It is not generally noticed that there are two distinct arguments for why the phenomenon of adaptation is a problem for subjective well-being as a measure of well-being. The Axiological Adaptation Argument is a counter-example to theories of well-being that (...)
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  7.  51
    Can happiness measures be calibrated?Mats Ingelström & Willem van der Deijl - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):5719-5746.
    Measures of happiness are increasingly being used throughout the social sciences. While these measures have attracted numerous types of criticisms, a crucial aspect of these measures has been left largely unexplored—their calibration. Using Eran Tal’s recently developed notion of calibration we argue first that the prospect of continued calibration of happiness measures is crucial for the science of happiness, and second, that continued calibration of happiness measures faces a particular problem—The Two Unknowns Problem. The Two Unknowns Problem relies on the (...)
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  8.  73
    Can desire-satisfaction alienate our good?Willem van der Deijl - 2023 - Journal of Value Inquiry 57 (4):687-700.
  9. All Animals are Equal, but Some More than Others?Huub Brouwer & Willem van der Deijl - 2020 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 17 (3):342-357.
    Does the moral badness of pain depend on who feels it? A common, but generally only implicitly stated view, is that it does not. This view, ‘unitarianism’, maintains that the same interests of different beings should count equally in our moral calculus. Shelly Kagan’s project in How to Count Animals, more or less is to reject this common view, and develop an alternative to it: a hierarchical view of moral status, on which the badness of pain does depend on who (...)
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  10.  59
    Can welfare be measured with a preference-satisfaction index?Willem van der Deijl - 2018 - Journal of Economic Methodology 25 (2):126-142.
    Welfare in economics is generally conceived of in terms of the satisfaction of preferences, but a general, comparable index measure of welfare is generally not taken to be possible. In recent years, in response to the usage of measures of subjective well-being as indices of welfare in economics, a number of economists have started to develop measures of welfare based on preference-satisfaction. In order to evaluate the success of such measures, I formulate criteria of policy-relevance and theoretical success in the (...)
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  11. Why Fly? Prudential Value, Climate Change, and the Ethics of Long-distance Leisure Travel.Dick Timmer & Willem van der Deijl - 2023 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 26 (5):689-707.
    We argue that the prudential benefits of long-distance leisure travel can justify such trips even though there are strong and important reasons against long-distance flying. This is because prudential benefits can render otherwise impermissible actions permissible, and because, according to dominant theories about wellbeing, long-distance leisure travel provides significant prudential benefits. However, this ‘wellbeing argument’ for long-distance leisure travel must be qualified in two ways. First, because travellers are epistemically privileged with respect to knowledge about what is good for them, (...)
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  12. What happiness science can learn from John Stuart Mill.Willem van der Deijl - 2016 - International Journal of Wellbeing 1 (6):164-179.
    Many researchers studying subjective wellbeing (SWB) understand SWB as a concept that is close to Bentham’s notion of happiness. This conception of happiness is philosophically controversial, because it treats pleasure as a homogenous experience. I analyze an important deviation from Bentham in John Stuart Mill’s Utilitarianism and its relevance for SWB research: qualitative differences in pleasurable experiences. I argue that in cases where lives involving qualitatively different experiences are compared, Mill’s qualitative perspective is incompatible with an important assumption in the (...)
     
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  13.  14
    The Future of the Philosophy of Work.Markus Furendal, Huub Brouwer & Willem van der Deijl - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):181-201.
    Work has always been a significant source of ethical questions, philosophical reflection, and political struggle. Although the future of work in a sense is always at stake, the issue is particularly relevant right now, in light of the advent of advanced AI systems and the collective experience of the COVID-19 pandemic. This has reinvigorated philosophical discussion and interest in the study of the future of work. The purpose of this survey article is to provide an overview of the emerging philosophical (...)
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  14.  35
    Clearing our Minds for Hedonic Phenomenalism.Lorenzo Buscicchi & Willem van der Deijl - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-16.
    What constitutes the nature of pleasure? According to hedonic phenomenalism, pleasant experiences are pleasant in virtue of some phenomenological features. According to hedonic attitudinalism, pleasure involves an attitude—a class of mental states that necessarily have an object. Consequently, pleasures are always _about_ something. We argue that hedonic attitudinalism is not able to accommodate pleasant moods. We first consider this argument more generally, and then consider what we call _the globalist strategy response_ to the possible objectless of moods, namely that pleasant (...)
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  15.  25
    Can Desert Solve the Problem of Stakes? A Reply to Olsaretti.Huub Brouwer & Willem van der Deijl - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 118 (3):399-405.
    Serena Olsaretti argues that desert cannot serve as a plausible principle of stakes for luck egalitarianism. In this discussion note, we defend the claim that she is too pessimistic about this by introducing a simple, but plausible, desert-based account of stakes that is immune to her argument.
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  16.  11
    Meaningful Work.Willem van der Deijl - 2023 - In Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.), Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 235-244.
    We hold an ambivalent attitude towards work. On the one hand, we see job creation as a good thing, as a way in which companies can contribute to society. On the other hand, work is often seen as something undesirable in itself. This chapter surveys a number of important philosophical questions related to the value of work in the context of business ethics: what is good work, and what is dignified work? What is exploitation? And should our general attitude towards (...)
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  17.  8
    Different Views on the Social Responsibility of Corporations.Willem van der Deijl & Wim Dubbink - 2023 - In Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.), Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 111-133.
    This chapter describes the concept Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in detail. We define CSR as the moral responsibility that companies have that goes beyond the bare minimum (abiding by minimal market morality), but that is nevertheless morally required. Because CSR is required, and not optional, it is different from philanthropy. The first part of this chapter presents the position of the proponents of CSR but also a view that denies that corporations are morally required to do more than the bare (...)
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  18.  4
    Corporate Responsibility and the Morality of the Market.Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl - 2023 - In Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.), Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 87-110.
    This chapter deals with the question to what extent market participants can have moral responsibilities. It starts with a discussion on the nature of responsibility, and then raises the question whether organizations, such as companies can bear responsibility (at all). While some philosophers have been skeptical, we list some reasons to think that companies can be moral agents. Subsequently, we discuss whether companies actually should assume moral responsibilities. There are a number of commonly heard arguments about why companies should or (...)
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  19.  38
    A Challenge for Capability Measures of Wellbeing.Willem J. A. van der Deijl - 2020 - Social Theory and Practice 46 (3):605-631.
    The measurement of wellbeing is among the central aims of the capability approach. I develop one particular challenge to the operationalizability of the approach in the context of wellbeing measurement. I argue that the capability approach is both committed to Individuation of Wellbeing—the view that the wellbeing contribution of different capabilities and functionings is person-dependent—as well as Rejection of Subjectivism—the view that wellbeing should not be conceptualized in terms of subjective judgments of preference-satisfaction or happiness. I argue that there is (...)
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  20.  6
    Moral Reasons.Willem van der Deijl - 2023 - In Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.), Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 67-86.
    Normative ethics is concerned with reflection on moral problems. It does so through the analysis of moral reasons. In this chapter we explain what a moral problem is, why some moral problems should be classified as problems of will, some as cognitive problems, and describe the difference between motivations and reasons. The chapter then provides an overview of three types of moral reasons: (1) reasons that derive from the consequences of our actions, (2) reasons that concern the acts themselves (principles), (...)
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  21. Distributive Justice: Getting What We Deserve from Our Country, Fred Feldman. Oxford University Press, 2016, ix + 279 pages. [REVIEW]Huub Brouwer & Willem van der Deijl - 2017 - Economics and Philosophy 33 (1):146-153.
  22.  8
    Review of Mark Fabian’s A Theory of Subjective Wellbeing. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2022, x + 305 pp. [REVIEW]Willem van der Deijl - 2023 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 16 (2):aa–aa.
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  23.  13
    Happiness – Concept, Measurement and Promotion, Yew-Kwang Ng, Springer, 2022, v + 183 pages. [REVIEW]Willem van der Deijl - 2023 - Economics and Philosophy 39 (1):170-176.