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William P. Alston [185]William Alston [16]
  1. Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language.William P. Alston - 1970 - Philosophical Quarterly 20 (79):172-179.
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  2. Epistemic Justification: Essays in the Theory of Knowledge.William P. Alston - 1989 - Cornell University Press.
    Introduction As the title indicates, the chief focus of this book is epistemic justification. But just what is epistemic justification and what is its place ...
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  3. Beyond "Justification": Dimensions of Epistemic Evaluation.William P. Alston - 2005 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    " In a book that seeks to shift the ground of debate within theory of knowledge, William P. Alston finds that the century-lo.
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  4. The deontological conception of epistemic justification.William P. Alston - 1988 - Philosophical Perspectives 2:257-299.
  5. Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience.William P. Alston - 1991 - Cornell University Press.
    Introduction i. Character of the Book The central thesis of this book is that experiential awareness of God, or as I shall be saying, the perception of God, ...
  6. Virtues of the Mind: An Inquiry into the Nature of Virtue and the Ethical Foundations of Knowledge.William P. Alston - 1996 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):197-201.
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  7. Concepts of Epistemic Justification.William P. Alston - 1985 - The Monist 68 (1):57-89.
    Justification, or at least ‘justification’, bulks large in recent epistemology. The view that knowledge consists of true-justified-belief has been prominent in this century, and the justification of belief has attracted considerable attention in its own right. But it is usually not at all clear just what an epistemologist means by ‘justified’, just what concept the term is used to express. An enormous amount of energy has gone into the attempt to specify conditions under which beliefs of one or another sort (...)
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  8.  9
    Divine Nature and Human Language: Essays in Philosophical Theology.William P. Alston - 2019 - Cornell University Press.
    Divine Nature and Human Language is a collection of twelve essays in philosophical theology by William P. Alston, one of the leading figures in the current renaissance in the philosophy of religion. Using the equipment of contemporary analytical philosophy, Alston explores, partly refashions, and defends a largely traditional conception of God and His work in the world a conception that finds its origins in medieval philosophical theology. These essays fall into two groups: those concerned with theological language and those that (...)
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  9. The Reliability of Sense Perception.William P. Alston - 1993 - Cornell University Press.
    Chapter INTRODUCTION i. The Problem Why suppose that sense perception is, by and large, an accurate source of information about the physical environment? ...
  10. A Realist Conception of Truth.William P. Alston - 1996 - Cornell University Press.
    William P. Alston formulates and defends a realist conception of truth, which he calls alethic realism (from "aletheia", Greek for "truth").
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  11. An internalist externalism.William P. Alston - 1988 - Synthese 74 (3):265 - 283.
  12.  31
    Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience.William P. Alston - 1993 - Cornell University Press.
    In this clear and provocative account of the epistemology of religious experience, William P. Alston argues that the perception of God—his term for direct experiential awareness of God—makes a major contribution to the grounds of religious belief. Surveying the variety of reported direct experiences of God, Alston demonstrates that a person can be justified in holding certain beliefs about God on the basis of mystical experience.
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  13. Epistemic circularity.William P. Alston - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (1):1-30.
  14. How to Think about Reliability.William P. Alston - 1995 - Philosophical Topics 23 (1):1-29.
  15.  26
    Philosophy of Language.William P. Alston - 1964 - Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA: Englewood Cliffs, N.J., Prentice-Hall.
  16.  12
    Illocutionary Acts and Sentence Meaning.William P. Alston - 2000 - Cornell University Press.
    What is it for a sentence to have a certain meaning? This is the question that the distinguished analytic philosopher William P. Alston addresses in this major contribution to the philosophy of language. His answer focuses on the given sentence's potential to play the role that its speaker had in mind, what he terms the usability of the sentence to perform the illocutionary act intended by its speaker. Alston defines an illocutionary act as an act of saying something with a (...)
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  17.  19
    Virtues of the Mind: An Inquiry into the Nature of Virtue and the Ethical Foundations of Knowledge.William P. Alston - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):185.
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  18. Internalism and Externalism in Epistemology.William P. Alston - 1986 - Philosophical Topics 14 (1):179-221.
    Internalism restricts justifiers to what is "within" the subject. two main forms of internalism are (1) perspectival internalism (pi), which restricts justifiers to what the subject knows or justifiably believes, and (2) access internalism (ai), which restricts justifiers to what is directly accessible to the subject. the two forms are analyzed and interrelated, and the grounds for each are examined. it is concluded that although pi is both unacceptable and without adequate support, a modest form of ai might be defended.
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  19. Illocutionary Acts and Sentence Meaning.William P. Alston - 1999 - Cornell University Press.
    William P. Alston. difference in the scope of the rule reflects the fact that I-rules exist for the sake of making communication possible. Whereas their cousins are enacted and enforced for other reasons. We could distinguish I-rules just by this ...
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  20. Level-Confusions in Epistemology.William P. Alston - 1980 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 5 (1):135-150.
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  21. Perceiving God.William P. Alston - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (11):655-665.
  22. The inductive argument from evil and the human cognitive condition.William P. Alston - 1991 - Philosophical Perspectives 5:29-67.
  23. Varieties of priveleged access.William P. Alston - 1971 - American Philosophical Quarterly 8 (3):223-41.
    This paper distinguishes and interrelates a number of respects in which persons have been thought to be in a specially favorable epistemic position vis-A-Vis their own mental states. The most important distinction is a six-Fold one between infallibility, Omniscience, Indubitability, Incorrigibility, Truth-Sufficiency, And self-Warrant. Each of these varieties can then be sub-Divided as the kind of modality, If any, Involved. It is also argued that discussions of self-Knowledge have been hampered by a failure to recognize these distinctions.
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  24. Ontological commitments.William P. Alston - 1958 - Philosophical Studies 9 (1-2):8 - 17.
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  25. Problems of philosophy of religion.William P. Alston - 1967 - In Paul Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy. New York: Macmillan. pp. 4.
  26.  6
    Ontological Commitments. --.William P. Alston - 1958 - Bobbs-Merrill.
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  27. Back to the theory of appearing.William P. Alston - 1999 - Philosophical Perspectives 13:181--203.
  28. Epistemic desiderata.William P. Alston - 1993 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (3):527-551.
  29. Two types of foundationalism.William P. Alston - 1976 - Journal of Philosophy 73 (7):165-185.
  30. What's wrong with immediate knowledge?William P. Alston - 1983 - Synthese 55 (April):73-96.
    Immediate knowledge is here construed as true belief that does not owe its status as knowledge to support by other knowledge (or justified belief) of the same subject. The bulk of the paper is devoted to a criticism of attempts to show the impossibility of immediate knowledge. I concentrate on attempts by Wilfrid Sellars and Laurence Bonjour to show that putative immediate knowledge really depends on higher-level knowledge or justified belief about the status of the beliefs involved in the putative (...)
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  31. An Internalist Externalism.William P. Alston - 2000 - In Sven Bernecker & Fred I. Dretske (eds.), Knowledge: Readings in Contemporary Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
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  32. Vagueness.William P. Alston - 1967 - In Paul Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy. New York: Macmillan. pp. 218--221.
  33. Divine Nature and Human Language: Essays in Philosophical Theology.William P. Alston (ed.) - 1989 - Cornell University Press.
  34. Illocutionary Acts and Sentence Meaning. [REVIEW]William P. Alston - 2000 - Dialogue 41 (3):589-590.
    This book is the culmination of almost forty years of writing and thinking about speech acts and the use theory of meaning. Chapter 1 sets out and defends a version of the Austin-Searle trichotomy of a sentential act, i.e., uttering a sentence or surrogate, an illocutionary act, i.e., uttering a sentence with a certain "content" as reported by indirect speech, and a perlocutionary act, i.e., producing an effect on an audience by an utterance. Chapter 2 poses the question: what condition (...)
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  35. Pleasure.William P. Alston - 1967 - In Paul Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy. New York: Macmillan. pp. 6--341.
     
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  36. The idea of phenomenology.Edmund Husserl, William P. Alston & George Nakhnikian - 1964 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 20 (4):538-538.
     
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  37. Perceiving God.William P. Alston - 1994 - Philosophy 69 (267):110-112.
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  38. Sellars and the "myth of the given".William P. Alston - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):69-86.
    Sellars is well known for his critique of the “myth of the given” in his “Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind”. That text does not make it unambiguous just how he understands the “myth”. Here I take it that whatever else may be involved, his critique is incompatible with the view that there is a nonconceptual mode of “presentation” or “givenness” of particulars that is the heart of sense perception and what is most distinctive of perception as a type of (...)
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  39. Has foundationalism been refuted?William P. Alston - 1976 - Philosophical Studies 29 (5):295.
    It is no part of my purpose in this paper to advocate Minimal Foundationalism. In fact I believe there to be strong objections to any form of foundationalism, and I feel that some kind of coherence or contextualist theory will provide a more adequate general orientation in epistemology. Will and Lehrer are to be commended for providing, in their different ways, important insights into some possible ways of developing a nonfoundationalist epistemology. Nevertheless if foundationalism is to be successfully disposed of (...)
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  40. Does God Have Beliefs?William P. Alston - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (3-4):287 - 306.
  41.  21
    Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience.Stephen Maitzen & William P. Alston - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (3):430.
  42.  72
    Epistemic Justification: Essays in the Theory of Knowledge.Divine Nature and Human Language: Essays in Philosophical Theology.William P. Alston - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (163):249-251.
  43.  16
    Renewing Philosophy.William P. Alston & Hilary Putnam - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (3):533.
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  44. Some suggestions for divine command theorists.William Alston - 1990 - In M. Beaty (ed.), Christian Theism and the Problems of Philosophy. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 303--326.
     
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  45.  29
    Back to the Theory of Appearing.William P. Alston - 1999 - Noûs 33 (s13):181-203.
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  46. Religious experience and religious belief.William P. Alston - 1982 - Noûs 16 (1):3-12.
    Can beliefs to the effect that god is manifesting himself in a certain way to the believer ("m-beliefs") be justified by its seeming to the believer that he experiences god doing that? the issue is discussed in the context of several concepts of justification. on a "normative" concept of justification the answer will depend on what one's intellectual obligations are vis-a-vis practices of belief formation. on a rigorous view of such obligations one is justified in forming a m-belief on the (...)
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  47. Can psychology do without private data?William P. Alston - 1972 - Behaviorism 1 (1):71-102.
  48. Perception and representation.William Alston - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):253-289.
    I oppose the popular view that the phenomenal character of perceptual experience consists in the subject's representing the (putative) perceived object as being so-and-so. The account of perceptual experience I favor instead is a version of the "Theory of Appearing" that takes it to be a matter of the perceived object's appearing to one as so-and-so, where this does not mean that the subject takes or believes it to be so-and-so. This plays no part in my criticisms of Representationalism. I (...)
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  49. Identity and cardinality: Geach and Frege.William P. Alston & Jonathan Bennett - 1984 - Philosophical Review 93 (4):553-567.
    P. T. Geach, notoriously, holds the Relative Identity Thesis, according to which a meaningful judgment of identity is always, implicitly or explicitly, relative to some general term. ‘The same’ is a fragmentary expression, and has no significance unless we say or mean ‘the same X’, where ‘X’ represents a general term (what Frege calls a Begriffswort or Begriffsausdruck). (P. T. Geach, Mental Acts (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1957), p. 69. I maintain that it makes no sense to judge whether (...)
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  50. Ineffability.William P. Alston - 1956 - Philosophical Review 65 (4):506-522.
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