21 found
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  1.  76
    Coordination and the Moral Obligation to Obey the Law.William S. Boardman - 1987 - Ethics 97 (3):546-557.
  2. Notes on a Utilitarian Justification of Rights: The Strategy of Pre-Commitment.William Boardman - unknown
    To begin with, we need to separate off the easy talk of “rights” in which they seem automatically to correspond with a person’s duties or obligations. It is of course true that since I have a duty not to wreak murder or mayhem on you, you have the corresponding right that I not do these things. But so far, the talk of “rights” is simply an alternative way to speak of someone else’s duties; the special or unique point to a (...)
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  3.  85
    Dreams, Dramas, and Scepticism.William S. Boardman - 1979 - Philosophical Quarterly 29 (116):220-228.
    Malcolm;[1] but the sharp attacks in the last decade on Malcolm's assumptions have led some philosophers to suppose that Descartes' dreaming problem is a cogent support for scepticism. [2] In this paper, I hope to dispose of the problem without using controversial assumptions of the sort used by Malcolm.
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  4. The Relativity of Perceptual Knowledge.William S. Boardman - 1993 - Synthese 94 (2):145-169.
    Since the most promising path to a solution to the problem of skepticism regarding perceptual knowledge seems to rest on a sharp distinction between perceiving and inferring, I begin by clarifying and defending that distinction. Next, I discuss the chief obstacle to success by this path, the difficulty in making the required distinction between merely logical possibilities that one is mistaken and the real (Austin) or relevant (Dretske) possibilities which would exclude knowledge. I argue that this distinction cannot be drawn (...)
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  5. Descartes' Meditations.William Boardman - unknown
    ESCARTES was born at the end of the sixteenth century, a time of enormous changes in the western intellectual world, largely brought about by the Reformation. Luther had denied the Church's authority to settle disputes on matters of faith: it was, he had insisted, the Scriptures alone which carry authority; pronouncements of the church, even those with long tradition behind them, were mere opinion, not truth. And so the question was explicitly raised and debated, how does one..
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  6.  12
    Intersensory Comparisons of Temporal Judgments.Sanford Goldstone, William K. Boardman & William T. Lhamon - 1959 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 57 (4):243.
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  7. Austin and the Inferential Account of Perception.William S. Boardman - manuscript
    O SET THE STAGE for the discussion[1], I will rehearse and clarify a well-known dispute between A. J. Ayer and J. L. Austin concerning whether perceptual judgments are inferences. Both in his Sense and Sensibilia[2] and in his "Other Minds,"[3] Austin carefully distinguishes recognizing that p from inferring that p. For the purpose of comparing his position to Ayer's, we might put his basic claim in this way: given the way words such as "recognize" and "infer" are used outside philosophical (...)
     
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  8.  36
    Conclusive Reasons and Scepticism.William S. Boardman - 1978 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 56 (1):32 – 40.
  9. Some Themes in David Schmidtz, the Limits of Government: An Essay on the Public Goods Argument (Westview Press: 1991).William Boardman - unknown
    The Scylla and Charybdis of institutions of cooperative enterprises are the potential for free riders, on the one hand, and the fact that some people may not value certain public goods. If we go to the one side, we encourage people who do value the public goods but whom cannot be excluded from enjoying them, to refuse to pay their share of the costs of providing them; if we go to the other side and force everyone to pay for them, (...)
     
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  10. Notes On: David K. Lewis, Convention: A Philosophical Study (Harvard: 1969).William Boardman - unknown
    Note on the tables: The agents represented by the rows and by the columns are choosing simultaneously and independently; each square represents the outcome of such a pair of choices. Column-chooser's payoff is shown in the top-right portion of a square; Row-chooser's payoff is shown in the bottom-left portion of a square. Each chooser knows what the payoffs would be for each set of concurrent choices and knows that the other chooser also knows. Because an outcome depends upon the combination (...)
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  11. Discussion of Peter Van Inwagen's "the Incompatibility of Free Will and Determinism".William Boardman - unknown
    I think that van Inwagen's argument is invalid because it equivocates on the modal auxiliaries. To give a quick idea of what I think has gone wrong, consider for comparison two arguments which are transparently invalid, though they superficially resemble Modus Tollens arguments: (a) If Lincoln was honest, he couldn't have pocketed the penny (such taking being dishonest). (b) But it is false that Lincoln could not have pocketed the penny: after all, he was not paralyzed and did not fail (...)
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  12. A Very Brief Appraisal of Ayer's Language, Truth and Logic.William Boardman - unknown
    I think that one of the main objections to be made to Ayer's verifiability criterion is simply the mechanical way in which it is designed to work: supposedly, a philosopher need not study, for example, how religious assertions are used, nor what sorts of illumination their users take themselves to be shedding on the human condition; instead, Ayer imagines that we can test them in a simple way that requires us to do no exploration whatever. This, surely, is hubris; and (...)
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  13. Forms in Plato's Republic.William Boardman - unknown
    A LTHOUGH the notion of a Form is important to Plato's theory, it is difficult to understand what these Forms are supposed to be and why Plato is convinced they exist. So I'll try, first, to help you make sense out of the doctrine of the Forms. Then I will try to show that this abstract doctrine is responsible for some concrete implications.
     
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  14. On Denoting.William Boardman - unknown
    By a `denoting phrase' I mean a phrase such as any one of the following: a man, some man, any man, every man, all men, the present King of England, the presenting King of France, the center of mass of the solar system at the first instant of the twentieth century, the revolution of the earth round the sun, the revolution of the sun round the earth. Thus a phrase is denoting solely in virtue of its..
     
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  15. Notes on David K. Lewis’s Book, Convention: A Philosophical Study.William Boardman - manuscript
     
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  16. Logical Foundations of Probability (1950).William Boardman - unknown
    The term 'explicatum' has been suggested by the following two usages. Kant calls a judgment explicative if the predicate is obtained by analysis, of the subject. Husserl, in speaking about the synthesis of identification between a confused, nonarticulated sense and a subsequently intended distinct, articulated sense, calls the latter the 'Explikat' of the former. (For both uses see Dictionary Of Philosophy [1942], ed. D. Runes, p. 105). What I mean by 'explicandum' and 'explicatum' is to some extent similar to what (...)
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  17. Sketch of an Argument From.William Boardman - unknown
    You are all, I trust, looking at the envelope I am holding up. Everybody see it? (Affirmative murmur from class.) Fine! Now you people to my left, notice that what you see is not strictly rectangular: it is trapezoidal. If you were an artist, you would draw what you see after this manner: (he draws trapezoid whose right, vertical side is longer than its left vertical side). (Murmur of approval for artistic talent.) Yet the people to my right will notice (...)
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  18. Some Comments on Moore's "Envelope" Argument.William Boardman - unknown
    In the sketch of his (discontinuous) envelope argument in his Some Main Problems of Philosophy (Macmillan: 1953), Moore treats the various phrases, "appears to be," "appears like a thing would appear if it were presented in a certain way," as though they were synonymous. Austin, in the fourth chapter of his Sense and Sensibilia (Oxford: 1962), tries to call to our attention the fact that these philosophically favorite phrases are not interchangeable; as a result, if an argument is begun by (...)
     
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  19. Notes on the Relevance to Ethics.William Boardman - manuscript
     
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  20. Health Care Rationing: What It Means.William Boardman - manuscript
     
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  21. Nomic Dependencies & Contrary-to-Fact Conditionals.William Boardman - unknown
    Consider Dretske's measles example (from page 74 in his Knowldege and the Flow of Information (MIT/Bradford: 1981) ): since the question of whether Alice's being one of Herman's children carries the information that she has the measles is a question about conditional probabilities, we must be careful about our specification of the condition, the antecedent. Although we are to suppose that it is a true generalization that all of Herman's children have the measles, since that is a coincidence, we can (...)
     
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