Results for 'William Bug'

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  1.  72
    The OBO Foundry: Coordinated Evolution of Ontologies to Support Biomedical Data Integration.Barry Smith, Michael Ashburner, Cornelius Rosse, Jonathan Bard, William Bug, Werner Ceusters, Louis J. Goldberg, Karen Eilbeck, Amelia Ireland, Christopher J. Mungall, Neocles Leontis & Others - 2007 - Nature Biotechnology 25 (11):1251--1255.
    The value of any kind of data is greatly enhanced when it exists in a form that allows it to be integrated with other data. One approach to integration is through the annotation of multiple bodies of data using common controlled vocabularies or ‘ontologies’. Unfortunately, the very success of this approach has led to a proliferation of ontologies which itself creates obstacles to integration. The Open Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) consortium has set in train a strategy to overcome this problem. Existing (...)
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  2. The Big Bad Bug: What Are the Humean's Chances?John Bigelow, John Collins & Robert Pargetter - 1993 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (3):443-462.
    Humean supervenience is the doctrine that there are no necessary connections in the world. David Lewis identifies one big bad bug to the programme of providing Humean analyses for apparently non-Humean features of the world. The bug is chance. We put the bug under the microscope, and conclude that chance is no special problem for the Humean.
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  3. The Big Bad Bug Bites Anti-Realists About Chance.Rachael Briggs - 2009 - Synthese 167 (1):81--92.
    David Lewis’s ‘Humean Supervenience’ (henceforth ‘HS’) combines realism about laws, chances, and dispositions with a sparse ontology according to which everything supervenes on the overall spatiotemporal distribution of non-dispositional properties (Lewis 1986a, Philosophical papers: Volume II, pp. ix–xvii, New York: Oxford Univesity Press, 1994, Mind 103:473–490). HS faces a serious problem—a “big bad bug” (Lewis 1986a, p. xiv): it contradicts the Principal Principle, a seemingly obvious norm of rational credence. Two authors have tried to rescue Lewis’s ontology from the ‘big (...)
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  4. The Writings of William James: A Comprehensive Edition.William James - 1967 - New York: University of Chicago Press.
  5. William Whewell's Theory of Scientific Method.William Whewell & Robert E. Butts - 1968 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
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  6.  64
    Raid! The Big, Bad Bug Dissolved.Jenann Ismael - unknown
    There’s a long history of discussion of probability in philosophy, but objective chance separated itself off and came into its own as a topic with the advent of a physical theory - quantum mechanics - in which chances play a central, and apparently ineliminable, role. In 1980 David Lewis wrote a paper pointing out that a very broad class of accounts of the nature of chance apparently lead to a contradiction when combined with a principle that expresses the role of (...)
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  7.  13
    William James in Focus: Willing to Believe.William J. Gavin - 2013 - Indiana University Press.
    Distilling the main currents of James's thought, William J. Gavin focuses on "latent" and "manifest" ideas in James to disclose the notion of "will to believe," which courses through his work.
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  8. William James's Radical Reconstruction of Philosophy.William James & Charlene Haddock Seigfried - 1992 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 28 (1):145-156.
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  9. The Correspondence of William James.William James - 1992 - University Press of Virginia.
    v. 1. William and Henry, 1861-1884 -- v. 2. William and Henry, 1885-1896 -- v. 3. William and Henry, 1897-1910 -- v. 4. 1856-1877 -- v. 5. 1878-1884 -- v. 6. 1885-1889 -- v. 7. 1890-1894 -- v. 8. 1895-June 1899 -- v. 9. July 1899-1901 -- v. 10. 1902-March 1905 -- v. 11. April 1905-March 1908 -- v. 12. April 1908-August 1910.
     
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  10.  23
    Divine Simplicity: WILLIAM E. MANN.William E. Mann - 1982 - Religious Studies 18 (4):451-471.
    In The City of God , XI, 10, St Augustine claims that the divine nature is simple because ‘it is what it has’ . We may take this as a slogan for the Doctrine of Divine Simplicity , a doctrine which finds its way into orthodox medieval Christian theological speculation. Like the doctrine of God's timeless eternality, the DDS has seemed obvious and pious to many, and incoherent, misguided, and repugnant to others. Unlike the doctrine of God's timeless eternality, the (...)
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  11. The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations.Anita Bandrowski, Ryan Brinkman, Mathias Brochhausen, Matthew H. Brush, Bill Bug, Marcus C. Chibucos, Kevin Clancy, Mélanie Courtot, Dirk Derom, Michel Dumontier, Liju Fan, Jennifer Fostel, Gilberto Fragoso, Frank Gibson, Alejandra Gonzalez-Beltran, Melissa A. Haendel, Yongqun He, Mervi Heiskanen, Tina Hernandez-Boussard, Mark Jensen, Yu Lin, Allyson L. Lister, Phillip Lord, James Malone, Elisabetta Manduchi, Monnie McGee, Norman Morrison, James A. Overton, Helen Parkinson, Bjoern Peters, Philippe Rocca-Serra, Alan Ruttenberg, Susanna-Assunta Sansone, Richard H. Scheuermann, Daniel Schober, Barry Smith, Larisa N. Soldatova, Christian J. Stoeckert, Chris F. Taylor, Carlo Torniai, Jessica A. Turner, Randi Vita, Patricia L. Whetzel & Jie Zheng - 2016 - PLoS ONE 11 (4):e0154556.
    The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) is an ontology that provides terms with precisely defined meanings to describe all aspects of how investigations in the biological and medical domains are conducted. OBI re-uses ontologies that provide a representation of biomedical knowledge from the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) project and adds the ability to describe how this knowledge was derived. We here describe the state of OBI and several applications that are using it, such as adding semantic expressivity to (...)
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  12. William James and Gestalt Psychology.William D. Woody - 1999 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 20 (1):79-92.
    To date, there have been only two scholarly papers devoted to a comparison of Gestalt psychology with the psychology of William James. An early paper by Mary Whiton Calkins called attention to numerous similarities between these two schools of thought. However, a more recent paper by Mary Henle argues that the ideas of William James, as presented in The Principles of Psychology, are irrelevant to Gestalt psychology. In what follows, this claim is evaluated both in terms of The (...)
     
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  13.  31
    Three Conceptual Problems That Bug Me (7th Scandinavian Logic Symposium, Uppsala Lecture, Aug.18-20, 1996 Draft).Solomon Feferman - unknown
    I will talk here about three problems that have bothered me for a number of years, during which time I have experimented with a variety of solutions and encouraged others to work on them. I have raised each of them separately both in full and in passing in various contexts, but thought it would be worthwhile on this occasion to bring them to your attention side by side. In this talk I will explain the problems, together with some things that (...)
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  14. The Letters of William James.William James - 1926 - Little, Brown & Co.
     
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  15. Raid! Dissolving the Big, Bad Bug.Jenann Ismael - 2008 - Noûs 42 (2):292–307.
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  16. The Writings of William James: A Comprehensive Edition, Including an Annotated Bibliography Updated Through 1977.William James - 1977 - University of Chicago Press.
    In his introduction to this collection, John representative. McDermott presents James's thinking in all its manifestations, stressing the importance of radical empiricism and placing into perspective the doctrines of pragmatism and the will to believe. The critical periods of James's life are highlighted to illuminate the development of his philosophical and psychological thought. The anthology features representive selections from The Principles of Psychology, The Will to Believe , and The Variety of Religious Experience in addition to the complete Essays in (...)
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  17.  8
    Waiting for the Millennium Bug.Ronnie Hawkins - 1999 - Ethics, Place and Environment 2 (2):267-274.
    With increasing appreciation that the Y2K problem may turn out to have unpredictable and potentially far-reaching effects, we are faced with what in some ways resembles the looming global ecological crisis, only this time what is at stake are not vital ecosystem services but rather the vital structures of our highly complex socially constructed reality—and this time we have a date-certain deadline for the onset of the crisis. Regardless of what actually happens when the calendar turns from 1999 to 2000, (...)
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  18.  13
    Waiting for the Millennium Bug.Ronnie Hawkins - 1999 - Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):267 – 274.
    With increasing appreciation that the Y2K problem may turn out to have unpredictable and potentially far-reaching effects, we are faced with what in some ways resembles the looming global ecological crisis, only this time what is at stake are not vital ecosystem services but rather the vital structures of our highly complex socially constructed reality—and this time we have a date-certain deadline for the onset of the crisis. Regardless of what actually happens when the calendar turns from 1999 to 2000, (...)
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  19.  39
    Does God Have Beliefs?: WILLIAM P. ALSTON.William P. Alston - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (3-4):287-306.
    Beliefs are freely attributed to God nowadays in Anglo–American philosophical theology. This practice undoubtedly reflects the twentieth–century popularity of the view that knowledge consists of true justified belief . The connection is frequently made explicit. If knowledge is true justified belief then whatever God knows He believes. It would seem that much recent talk of divine beliefs stems from Nelson Pike's widely discussed article, ‘Divine Omniscience and Voluntary Action’. In this essay Pike develops a version of the classic argument for (...)
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  20.  8
    William Cullen and the Teaching of Chemistry—II.William P. D. Wightman - 1956 - Annals of Science 12 (3):192-205.
  21.  41
    Mysticism and Sense Perception: WILLIAM J. WAINWRIGHT.William J. Wainwright - 1973 - Religious Studies 9 (3):257-278.
    In this paper I propose to examine the cognitive status of mystical experience. There are, I think, three distinct but overlapping sorts of religious experience. In the first place, there are two kinds of mystical experience. The extrovertive or nature mystic identifies himself with a world which is both transfigured and one. The introvertive mystic withdraws from the world and, after stripping the mind of concepts and images, experiences union with something which can be described as an undifferentiated unity. Introvertive (...)
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  22. The Anatomy of the Big Bad Bug.Rachael Briggs - 2009 - Noûs 43 (3):428-449.
  23. An Irenic Idea About Metaphor: William G. Lycan.William G. Lycan - 2013 - Philosophy 88 (1):5-32.
    Donald Davidson notoriously rejected ‘metaphorical meaning’ and denied the existence of linguistic mechanisms by which metaphorical significance is conveyed. He contended that the meanings metaphorical sentences have are just their literal meanings, though metaphorical utterances may brute-causally have important cognitive effects. Contrastingly, John Searle offers a Gricean account of metaphor as an elaborated kind of implicature, and defends metaphorical meaning as speaker-meaning. Each of those positions is subject to very telling objections from the other's point of view. This paper proposes (...)
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  24.  17
    William Wilberforce on the Idea of Negro Inferiority.William Baker - 1970 - Journal of the History of Ideas 31 (3):433.
  25.  34
    Free Will and the Burden of Proof: William G. Lycan.William G. Lycan - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 53:107-122.
    Here are some things that are widely believed about free will and determinism. Free will is prima facie incompatible with determinism. The incompatibility is logical or at least conceptual or a priori. A compatibilist needs to explain how free will can co-exist with determinism, paradigmatically by offering an analysis of ‘free’ action that is demonstrably compatible with determinism. Free will is not impugned by quantum in determinism, at least not in the same decisive way that it is impugned by determinism. (...)
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  26. Political Writings of William Morris.William Morris & A. L. Morton - 1984 - Science and Society 48 (4):496-499.
  27.  27
    Biddhist Emptiness in the Ethics and Aesthetics of Watsuji Tetsurō*: WILLIAM R. LAFLEUR.William R. Lafleur - 1978 - Religious Studies 14 (2):237-250.
    During the past few decades a growing interest in what is often called the ‘Kyoto School’ of philosophy has evidenced itself here and there in the West, especially in discussions of comparative religious thought and in the pages of journals which are sensitive, in the post-colonial world, to the value of giving attention to contemporary thought that originates outside the Anglo-American and continental contexts. What has made the so-called Kyoto School especially interesting is the fact that those thinkers identified with (...)
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  28.  4
    [Book Review] the Gold Bug Variations. [REVIEW]Richard Powers - 1996 - Hastings Center Report 26 (3).
  29.  18
    Is Law Coercive?: William A. Edmundson.William A. Edmundson - 1995 - Legal Theory 1 (1):81-111.
    That law is coercive is something we all more or less take for granted. It is an assumption so rooted in our ways of thinking that it is taken as a given of social reality, an uncontroversial datum. Because it is so regarded, it is infrequently stated, and when it is, it is stated without any hint of possible complications or qualifications. I will call this the “prereflective view,” and I want to examine it with the care it deserves.
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  30. William James's Philosophy: A New Perspective.William James & Marcus Peter Ford - 1982 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 19 (1):111-115.
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  31.  30
    God, Modality, and Morality, by William E. Mann. [REVIEW]William F. Vallicella - 2016 - Faith and Philosophy 33 (3):374-381.
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  32.  18
    Religious ‘Seeing-As’: WILLIAM L. REESE.William L. Reese - 1978 - Religious Studies 14 (1):73-87.
    The conceptual framework of religion is more like the frame of a picture than the frame of a house; and what goes on within the frame is other than conceptual. This is the hypothesis motivating the analysis which follows. Given the hypothesis, the problem is to conceive what religion is - this other-than-conceptual enterprise which tends to attract conceptual frames. A possible answer is available in Wittgensteinian ‘seeing-as’. A number of philosophers of religion have recently exercised this option. The present (...)
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  33.  46
    Defining ‘Gratuitous Evil’: A Response to Alan R. Rhoda: William Hasker.William Hasker - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (3):303-309.
    In his article, ‘Gratuitous evil and divine providence’, Alan Rhoda claims to have produced an uncontroversial theological premise for the evidential argument from evil. I argue that his premise is by no means uncontroversial among theists, and I doubt that any premise can be found that is both uncontroversial and useful for the argument from evil.
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  34. William James and the Reinstatement of the Vague.William Joseph GAVIN - 1992 - Temple University Press.
     
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  35.  95
    William James Pragmatism in Focus.William James & Doris Olin (eds.) - 1992 - Routledge.
    The original 1907 text is accompanied with a series of critical essays from scholars including Moore and Russell. In the introduction Olin evaluates the strength of the criticisms made against James.
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  36.  21
    Cosmopolitan Altruism*: WILLIAM A. GALSTON.William A. Galston - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):118-134.
    This essay focuses on what I shall call “cosmopolitan altruism”—the motivationally effective desire to assist needy or endangered strangers. Section I describes recent research that confirms the existence of this phenomenon. Section II places it within interlocking sets of moral typologies that distinguish among forms of altruism along dimensions of scope, interests risked, motivational source, and baseline of moral judgment. Section III explores some of the relationships between altruism—a concept rooted in modern moral philosophy and Christianity—and the understanding of virtue (...)
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  37.  32
    Games Lawyers Play: Legal Discovery and Social Epistemology: William J. Talbott and Alvin I. Goldman.William J. Talbott - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (2):93-163.
    In the movie Regarding Henry, the main character, Henry Turner, is a lawyer who suffers brain damage as a result of being shot during a robbery. Before being wounded, the Old Henry Turner had been a successful lawyer, admired as a fierce competitor and well-known for his killer instinct. As a result of the injury to his brain, the New Henry Turner loses the personality traits that had made the Old Henry such a formidable adversary.
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  38. The Moral Philosophy of William James.William James - 1969 - New York: Crowell.
     
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  39.  24
    Simplicity and Properties: A Reply to Morris: WILLIAM E. MANN.William E. Mann - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (3-4):343-353.
    The doctrine of divine simplicity, the doctrine that God has no physical or metaphysical complexity whatsoever, is not a doctrine designed to induce immediate philosophical acquiescence. There are severe questions about its coherence. And even if those questions can be answered satisfactorily in favour of the doctrine, there remains the question why anyone should accept it. Thomas V. Morris raises both sorts of questions about a version of the doctrine which I have put forward. In the following pages I shall (...)
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  40. Perspectives on the Philosophy of William P. Alston.William P. Alston, Carl Ginet, Alvin I. Goldman, John Greco, George I. Mavrodes, Philip L. Quinn, Alessandra Tanesini, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Linda Zagzebski & Laurence BonJour - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    One of the most influential analytic philosophers of the late twentieth century, William P. Alston is a leading light in epistemology, philosophy of religion, and the philosophy of language. In this volume, twelve leading philosophers critically discuss the central topics of his work in these areas, including perception, epistemic circularity, justification, the problem of religious diversity, and truth.
     
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  41. William P. Alston's Epistemology of Religious Experience: The Problem of Subjectivism.William Mckenith - 2004 - Dissertation, Drew University
    William P. Alston's book, Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience , challenges the contemporary view that religious experience is purely subjective. He theorizes that a direct experiential awareness of God can produce immediately justified beliefs about God. Accordingly, this dissertation critically assesses the problem of subjectivism thought to taint Alston's epistemology of religious experience. ;Upon disclosing the prevalence of subjectivity, and identifying the potential for objectivity in religious experience, this treatise produces a viable resolve for objectivity in mystical (...)
     
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  42.  13
    William James and the Right to Over-Believe.William Lad Sessions - 1981 - Philosophy Research Archives 7:996-1045.
    William James's essay, "The Will to Believe," is interpreted as a philosophical argument for two conclusions: Some over-beliefs—i.e., beliefs going beyond the available evidence—are rationally justified under certain conditions; and "The Religious Hypothesis" is justified for some people under these conditions. Section I defends viewing James as presenting arguments, Sections II-III try to formulate the dual conclusions more precisely, and Section IT defends this reading against alternative interpretations. Section 7, the heart of the paper, elaborates five logically distinct arguments (...)
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  43.  31
    Pluralist Constitutionalism: William A. Galston.William A. Galston - 2011 - Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (1):228-241.
    This essay explores the ways in which a broadly pluralist outlook can help illuminate longstanding issues of constitutional theory and practice. It begins with a common-sense understanding of pluralism as the diversity of observed practices within a general category. It turns out that many assumptions Americans and others often make about constitutional essentials are valid only locally but not generically. The essay then turns to pluralism in a more technical and philosophical sense—specifically, the account of value pluralism adumbrated by Isaiah (...)
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  44.  8
    William Hamilton on Causation.William Mander - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):333-348.
    The nineteenth-century British philosopher William Hamilton defended his law of the conditioned in part on the strength of its ability to offer a satisfactory theory of causation. He maintained that our belief that every event is the outcome of some cause and the source of some further effect finds its ground, not in the world, but rather in the limitations of our own minds; specifically in our inability to conceive of either absolute commencement of being or its absolute annihilation. (...)
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  45.  14
    William of Sherwood's Treatise on Syncategorematic Words.William Sherwood - 1968 - Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.
    Translator's Introduction This book may be studied independently, but in several respects it is a companion volume to my William of Sherwood's Introduction ...
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  46. Is Hypocrisy a Problem for Consequentialism?: William H. Shaw.William H. Shaw - 1999 - Utilitas 11 (3):340-346.
    Eldon Soifer and Béla Szabados argue that hypocrisy poses a problem for consequentialism because the hypocrite, in pretending to live up to a norm he or she does not really accept, acts in ways that have good results. They argue, however, that consequentialists can meet this challenge and show the wrongness of hypocrisy by adopting a desirefulfilment version of their theory. This essay raises some doubts about Soifer and Szabados's proposal and argues that consequentialism has no difficulty coming to grips (...)
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  47.  11
    Deception and the Trinity: A Rejoinder to Tuggy: William Hasker.William Hasker - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (1):117-120.
    Dale Tuggy argues that his divine-deception argument against Social Trinitarianism remains unscathed, in spite of my recent objections. I maintain that his argument is question-begging and exegetically weak, and does not succeed in refuting Social Trinitarianism.
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  48.  63
    Explanatory Priority: Transitive and Unequivocal, a Reply to William Craig.William Hasker - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (2):389-393.
    According to William Craig, the notion of explanatory priority is the Achilles' heel of Robert Adams' argument against Molinism. Specifically, Craig contends that (1) the notion of explanatory priority is employed equivocally in the argument; (2) Adams is guilty of conflating reasons and causes; and (3) one of the intermediate conclusions of the argument is invalidly inferred, as can be seen by a counterexample. I argue that Craig is mistaken on all counts, and that Adams' argument emerges unscathed.
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  49. The Disappearance of Introspection.William E. Lyons - 1986 - MIT Press.
    William Lyons presents an original thesis on introspection as self-interpretation in terms of a culturally influenced model. His work rests on a lucid, careful, and critical examination of the transformations that have occurred over the past century in the concepts and models of introspection in philosophy and psychology. He reviews the history of introspection in the work of Wundt, Boring, and William James, and reactions to it by behaviorists Watson, Lashley, Ryle, and Skinner.
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  50.  98
    Beneficence/Benevolence: WILLIAM K. FRANKENA.William K. Frankena - 1987 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (2):1-20.
    I begin with a note about moral goodness as a quality, disposition, or trait of a person or human being. This has at least two different senses, one wider and one narrower. Aristotle remarked that the Greek term we translate as justice sometimes meant simply virtue or goodness as applied to a person and sometimes meant only a certain virtue or kind of goodness. The same thing is true of our word “goodness.” Sometimes being a good person means having all (...)
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