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William David Hart [8]William D. Hart [5]
  1.  87
    The Engines of the Soul.William D. Hart - 1988 - Cambridge University Press.
    Dr Hart sets out to answer this question by showing that the issue is as much about the nature of causation as it is about the natures of mind and matter.
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  2.  11
    Debate, Prophecy, and Revolution: Notes on Cathleen Kaveny's Prophecy Without Contempt.William David Hart - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):173-180.
    In Prophecy without Contempt, Cathleen Kaveny argues that prevailing scholarly approaches to religious and public discourse misunderstand the actual complexity of moral rhetoric in America. She endeavors to provide a better account through study of the role the Puritan jeremiad has played. Kaveny then offers a normative case for deliberative public moral discourse and the limited exercise of prophetic denunciation. I argue that Kaveny's distinction between deliberation and prophetic denunciation is overdrawn. They are ideal types that elide other rhetorical forms. (...)
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  3.  46
    Naturalizing Christian Ethics: A Critique of Charles Taylor's a Secular Age. [REVIEW]William David Hart - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (1):149-170.
    This essay critically engages the concept of transcendence in Charles Taylor's A Secular Age. I explore his definition of transcendence, its role in holding a modernity-inspired nihilism at bay, and how it is crucial to the Christian antihumanist argument that he makes. In the process, I show how the critical power of this analysis depends heavily and paradoxically on the Nietzschean antihumanism that he otherwise rejects. Through an account of what I describe as naturalistic Christianity, I argue that transcendence need (...)
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  4.  24
    Slaves, Fetuses, and Animals.William David Hart - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (4):661-690.
    This essay is an exploration in ethical rhetoric, specifically, the ethics of comparing the status of fetuses and animals to enslaved Africans. On the view of those who make such comparisons, the fetus is treated as a slave through abortion, reproductive technologies, and stem cell research, while animals are enslaved through factory farming, experimentation, and as laborers, circus performers, and the like. I explore how the apotheosis of the fetus and the humanization of animals represent the flipside of the subjugation (...)
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  5.  16
    Introduction.William David Hart - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (4):585-590.
    The essays in this focus on race and ethics approach the topic from a variety of perspectives. Yet they all advance a basic claim: race—a euphemism for white supremacy—is an ethical issue too often evaded. The essays demonstrate that the ethics of race is integrally bound up with religion, colonialism, and secularism.
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  6.  37
    Constellations: Capitalism, Antiblackness, Afro-Pessimism, and Black Optimism.William David Hart - 2018 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 39 (1):5.
    The discovery of gold and silver in America, the extirpation, enslavement and entombment in mines of the aboriginal population, the beginning of the conquest and looting of the East Indies, the turning of Africa into a warren for the commercial hunting of black-skins, signalised the rosy dawn of the era of capitalist production.1"In the antiblack world there is but one race, and that race is black. Thus, to be racialized is to be pushed 'down,' toward blackness, and to be deracialized (...)
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  7.  23
    Edward Said and the Religious Effects of Culture.William D. Hart - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book provides a distinctive account of Edward Said's critique of modern culture by highlighting the religion-secularism distinction on which it is predicated. This distinction is both literal and figurative. It refers, on the one hand, to religious traditions and to secular traditions and, on the other hand, to tropes that extend the meaning and reference of religion and secularism in indeterminate ways. The author takes these tropes as the best way of organizing Said's heterogeneous corpus - from Joseph Conrad (...)
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  8.  9
    Neville's Metaphysics.William David Hart - 2016 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 37 (3):248-262.
    The goal of this essay is three fold: first, to describe briefly the “sublation thesis”; second, to show how Robert Neville’s Philosophical Theology evades the thesis; and, third, to assess the compatibility of Neville’s metaphysics and pragmatic naturalism. Traditionally, the philosophy of religion addresses a small bundle of interrelated issues: arguments regarding the existence, nature, and knowledge of God, the rationality of belief, and the problem of evil. Early modern forms of the philosophy of religion also address the immortality of (...)
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  9.  11
    Jesus, Whiteness, and the Disinherited.William David Hart - 2012 - In George Yancy (ed.), Christology and Whiteness: What Would Jesus Do? Routledge.
  10.  4
    Editor's Note.William David Hart - 2018 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 39 (1):3-4.
    Four of the articles in this "Special Issue: Race and Antiblackness in American Philosophy and Theology" were first presented as papers at the 2017 annual meeting of the Institute of American Philosophy and Theology. The conference theme was "Race, Antiblackness, and Philosophy." As the truism holds, "race" is a construct. But constructs are real—every bit as real as rocks and minds. Constructs, such as race, are the sum of their effects: consequent rather than antecedent realities, historical products of our practices, (...)
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