11 found
Order:
  1.  8
    Functional Parallelism in Spoken Word-Recognition.William D. Marslen-Wilson - 1987 - Cognition 25 (1-2):71-102.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   94 citations  
  2.  17
    Modelling the Effects of Semantic Ambiguity in Word Recognition.Jennifer M. Rodd, M. Gareth Gaskell & William D. Marslen-Wilson - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (1):89-104.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  3.  12
    Morphology, Language and the Brain: The Decompositional Substrate for Language Comprehension.William D. Marslen-Wilson & Lorraine K. Tyler - 2008 - In Jon Driver, Patrick Haggard & Tim Shallice (eds.), Mental Processes in the Human Brain. Oxford University Press. pp. 362--1481.
  4.  13
    Ambiguity, Competition, and Blending in Spoken Word Recognition.M. Gareth Gaskell & William D. Marslen-Wilson - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (4):439-462.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  5. Morphological Processes in Language Comprehension.William D. Marslen-Wilson - 2009 - In Gareth Gaskell (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Psycholinguistics. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6.  30
    Capturing Underlying Differentiation in the Human Language System.William D. Marslen-Wilson & Lorraine K. Tyler - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):62-63.
  7.  6
    Abstract Morphemes and Lexical Representation: The CV-Skeleton in Arabic.Sami Boudelaa & William D. Marslen-Wilson - 2004 - Cognition 92 (3):271-303.
    Overlaps in form and meaning between morphologically related words have led to ambiguities in interpreting priming effects in studies of lexical organization. In Semitic languages like Arabic, however, linguistic analysis proposes that one of the three component morphemes of a surface word is the CV-Skeleton, an abstract prosodic unit coding the phonological shape of the surface word and its primary syntactic function, which has no surface phonetic content (McCarthy, J. J. (1981). A prosodic theory of non-concatenative morphology, Linguistic Inquiry, 12 (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  16
    Morphological Units in the Arabic Mental Lexicon.Sami Boudelaa & William D. Marslen-Wilson - 2001 - Cognition 81 (1):65-92.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  17
    A Connectionist Model of Phonological Representation in Speech Perception.M. Gareth Gaskell, Mary Hare & William D. Marslen-Wilson - 1995 - Cognitive Science 19 (4):407-439.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  17
    The Processing of English Regular Inflections: Phonological Cues to Morphological Structure.Brechtje Post, William D. Marslen-Wilson, Billi Randall & Lorraine K. Tyler - 2008 - Cognition 109 (1):1-17.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  5
    What Phonetic Decision Making Does Not Tell Us About Lexical Architecture.William D. Marslen-Wilson - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):337-338.
    Norris et al. argue against using evidence from phonetic decision making to support top-down feedback in lexical access on the grounds that phonetic decision relies on processes outside the normal access sequence. This leaves open the possibility that bottom-up connectionist models, with some contextual constraints built into the access process, are still preferred models of spoken-word recognition.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark