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  1. Augustine.William E. Mann - 1990 - Philosophical Books 31 (1):15-18.
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  2. Descartes and Augustine. [REVIEW]William E. Mann - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (3):438-441.
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  3. Duns Scotus, Demonstration, and Doctrine.William E. Mann - 1992 - Faith and Philosophy 9 (4):436-462.
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  4. Epistemology Supernaturalized.William E. Mann - 1985 - Faith and Philosophy 2 (4):436-456.
    If God is omniscient then he knows contingent facts. If he exists a se, then his knowledge of facts must not depend on them. How then does he know them? I take seriously Aquinas’ view that God’s knowledge is the cause of things. I argue that “things” includes both entities and situations, that God’s knowledge of them is his knowledge of his unimpedable will, and that the view does not threaten human freedom. God’s knowledge is thus like my knowledge of (...)
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  5. Keeping Epistemology Supernaturalized: A Reply to Rosenkrantz.William E. Mann - 1985 - Faith and Philosophy 2 (4):464-468.
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  6. Perplexity and Mystery.William E. Mann - 1998 - Metaphilosophy 29 (3):209-222.
    In this paper I comment on Gareth B. Matthews's “The Socratic Augustine” and Peter King's “Augustine on the Impossibility of Teaching.” Matthews's paper adduces several instances of Augustine's apparent willingness to accept Socratic perplexity in some philosophical matters. Matthews suggests that these cases are compatible with Augustine's dogmatism because Augustine presupposes that the phenomena in question, although perplexing, are actual. I suggest instead that Augustine can be viewed as taking a neutral stance toward many of his examples, because they arise (...)
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  7. Pride and Preference: A Reply to MacDonald.William E. Mann - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):156-168.
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  8. Piety: Lending a Hand to Euthyphro.William E. Mann - 1998 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (1):123-142.
    Many philosophers take the point of Plato’s Euthyphro to be an indictment of attempts to ground morality in religion, specifically in the attitudes of a deity or deities. It has been argued cogently in recent essays that Plato’s case is far from conclusive. This essay suggests instead that the Euthyphro can be read more narrowly as raising critical questions about a specific religious virtue, Piety. Then it presents the ingredients of a reply to those questions. The reply proceeds by suggesting (...)
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  9. Piety: Lending a Hand to Euthyphro.William E. Mann - 1998 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 58 (1):123-142.
    Many philosophers take the point of Plato's Euthyphro to be an indictment of attempts to ground morality in religion, specifically in the attitudes of a deity or deities. It has been argued cogently in recent essays that Plato's case is far from conclusive. This essay suggests instead that the Euthyphro can be read more narrowly as raising critical questions about a specific religious virtue, Piety. Then it presents the ingredients of a reply to those questions. The reply proceeds by suggesting (...)
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  10. Straight and Circular: A Study of Imagery in Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]William E. Mann - 1983 - International Studies in Philosophy 15 (3):74-76.
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  11. Simplicity and Immutability in God.William E. Mann - 1983 - International Philosophical Quarterly 23 (3):267-276.
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  12. To Catch a Heretic: Augustine on Lying.William E. Mann - 2003 - Faith and Philosophy 20 (4):479-495.
    Augustine devoted two treatises to the topic of lying, De Mendacio and Contra Mendacium ad Consentium. The treatises raise interesting questions about whatlying is while defending the thesis that all lies are sinful. The first part of this essay offers an interpretation of Augustine’s attempts at definition. The second part exanlines his argunlents for the sinfulness of lying used to trap heretics and for the more general thesis that all lying is sinful.
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  13. The Existence and Nature of God. [REVIEW]William E. Mann - 1985 - Faith and Philosophy 2 (2):195-204.
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