10 found
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  1.  43
    Too Much Eukaryote LGT.William F. Martin - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (12):1700115.
    The realization that prokaryotes naturally and frequently disperse genes across steep taxonomic boundaries via lateral gene transfer gave wings to the idea that eukaryotes might do the same. Eukaryotes do acquire genes from mitochondria and plastids and they do transfer genes during the process of secondary endosymbiosis, the spread of plastids via eukaryotic algal endosymbionts. From those observations it, however, does not follow that eukaryotes transfer genes either in the same ways as prokaryotes do, or to a quantitatively similar degree. (...)
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  2.  28
    Unmiraculous Facultative Anaerobes.William F. Martin - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (6):1700041.
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  3.  9
    Energy for Two: New Archaeal Lineages and the Origin of Mitochondria.William F. Martin, Sinje Neukirchen, Verena Zimorski, Sven B. Gould & Filipa L. Sousa - 2016 - Bioessays 38 (9):850-856.
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  4.  16
    A Framework for Understanding Ethical and Efficiency Issues in Pharmaceutical Intellectual Property Litigation.Margaret Oppenheimer, Helen LaVan & William F. Martin - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (3):505-524.
    Developing and applying a framework for understanding the complexities of economic and legal considerations in two recent Supreme Court rulings was the focus of this research. Of especial concern was the protection of intellectual property in the pharmaceutical industry. Two cases from 2013 were selected: FTC v. Activis and Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc.. Part of the rationale for the selection was the importance of the Supreme Court rulings and the importance of the pharmaceutical sector. A qualitative (...)
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  5.  47
    Planctomycetes and Eukaryotes: A Case of Analogy Not Homology.James O. McInerney, William F. Martin, Eugene V. Koonin, John F. Allen, Michael Y. Galperin, Nick Lane, John M. Archibald & T. Martin Embley - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (11):810-817.
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  6.  12
    Is Something Wrong with the Tree of Life?William F. Martin - 1996 - Bioessays 18 (7):523-527.
  7.  4
    Big Questions and Skepsis: Review of “In Search of Cell History”. [REVIEW]William F. Martin - 2015 - Bioessays 37 (4):349-351.
  8.  3
    Of Early Animals, Anaerobic Mitochondria, and a Modern Sponge.Marek Mentel, Mayo Röttger, Sally Leys, Aloysius G. M. Tielens & William F. Martin - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (10):924-932.
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  9.  13
    University Mission Statements and Sustainability Performance.Yvette P. Lopez & William F. Martin - 2018 - Business and Society Review 123 (2):341-368.
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  10.  7
    To What Inanimate Matter Are We Most Closely Related and Does the Origin of Life Harbor Meaning?William F. Martin, Falk S. P. Nagies & Andrey do Nascimento Vieira - 2021 - Philosophies 6 (33):33.
    The question concerning the meaning of life is important, but it immediately confronts the present authors with insurmountable obstacles from a philosophical standpoint, as it would require us to define not only what we hold to be life, but what we hold to be meaning in addition, requiring us to do both in a properly researched context. We unconditionally surrender to that challenge. Instead, we offer a vernacular, armchair approach to life’s origin and meaning, with some layman’s thoughts on the (...)
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