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William Flanagan [3]William G. Flanagan [1]
  1. Dirty Rotten Ceos: How Business Leaders Are Fleecing America.William G. Flanagan - 2003 - Citadel Press/Kensington.
  2.  40
    “AIDS is Not a Business”: A Study in Global Corporate Responsibility – Securing Access to Low-Cost HIV Medications.William Flanagan & Gail Whiteman - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (1):65-75.
    At the end of the 1990s, Brazil was faced with a potentially explosive HIV/AIDS epidemic. Through an innovative and multifaceted campaign, and despite initial resistance from multinational pharmaceutical companies, the government of Brazil was able to negotiate price reductions for HIV medications and develop local production capacity, thereby averting a public health disaster. Using interview data and document analysis, the authors show that the exercise of corporate social responsibility can be viewed in practice as a dynamic negotiation and an interaction (...)
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  3.  23
    “AIDS is Not a Business”.William Flanagan & Gail Whiteman - 2005 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 2:375-391.
    Most major pharmaceutical companies have corporate social responsibility policies that pledge their commitment to improving the health and quality of life of people around the world. Yet these same companies also have difficulty in ensuring that developing countries have access to affordable medications. In the late 1990s, Brazil engaged in a heated battle with large US-backed multinational pharmaceutical companies. Brazil was facing a growing HIV epidemic and was determined to provide treatment to those in need. This required massive price reductions (...)
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  4.  18
    AIDS is Not a Business.William Flanagan & Gail Whiteman - 2005 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 2:375-391.
    Most major pharmaceutical companies have corporate social responsibility policies that pledge their commitment to improving the health and quality of life of people around the world. Yet these same companies also have difficulty in ensuring that developing countries have access to affordable medications. In the late 1990s, Brazil engaged in a heated battle with large US-backed multinational pharmaceutical companies. Brazil was facing a growing HIV epidemic and was determined to provide treatment to those in need. This required massive price reductions (...)
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