Results for 'William Forgie'

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  1.  19
    The Cosmological and Ontological Arguments: How Saint Thomas Solved the Kantian Problem: J. William Forgie.J. William Forgie - 1995 - Religious Studies 31 (1):89-100.
    Let us call the Dependency Theses the view, first stated by Kant, that certain versions of the cosmological argument depend on the ontological argument. At least two different reasons have been given for the supposed dependence. Given the DT, some of Aquinas' views about God's essence, and about our knowledge of God's existence, can seem, at least at first, to be inconsistent. I consider two different ways of defending Aquinas against this suspicion of inconsistency. On the first defence, based on (...)
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  2.  6
    Hubert Rudolf Georg Schwyzer, 1935-2006.William Forgie, Charles McCracken & Merrill Ring - 2007 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 80 (5):173 - 174.
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  3. Wittgenstein, Skepticism and Non-Inductive Evidence.J. William Forgie - 1986 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 67 (4):269.
  4.  4
    Wittgenstein on Naming and Ostensive Definition.J. William Forgie - 1976 - International Studies in Philosophy 8:13-26.
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  5.  32
    Mystical Experience and the Argument From Agreement.J. William Forgie - 1985 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 17 (3):97 - 113.
  6.  57
    Kant on the Relation Between the Cosmological and Ontological Arguments.J. William Forgie - 1993 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 34 (1):1 - 12.
  7.  55
    Kant and the Question "Is Existence a Predicate?".J. William Forgie - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 5 (4):563 - 582.
    Kant gave a two-fold answer to the question, ‘Is existence a predicate?’. His view that existence is not a first-level predicate, i.e., a predicate of objects like horses, stones, and you and me, is widely known. What is not so well-known, however, is his claim that existence is a second-level predicate, a predicate of concepts or of a collection of predicates. In this paper I hope to show why his arguments for both claims are unsuccessful.
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  8.  77
    Kant and Existence: Critique of Pure Reason A 600/B 628.J. William Forgie - 2008 - Kant Studien 99 (1):1-12.
    By whatever and by however many predicates we may think a thing – even if we completely determine it – we do not make the least addition to the thing when we further declare that this thing is. Otherwise, it would not be exactly the same thing that exists, but something more than we had thought in the concept; and we could not, therefore, say that the exact object of my concept exists.
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  9.  56
    Kant and Frege: Existence as a Second-Level Property.J. William Forgie - 2000 - Kant Studien 91 (2):165-177.
  10.  65
    Is the Cartesian Ontological Argument Defensible?J. William Forgie - 1976 - New Scholasticism 50 (1):108-121.
  11.  28
    How is the Question ‘Is Existence a Predicate?’ Relevant to the Ontological Argument?J. William Forgie - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (3):117-133.
    It is often said that the ontological argument fails because it wrongly treats existence as a first-level property or predicate. This has proved a controversial claim, and efforts to evaluate it are complicated by the fact that the words 'existence is not a property/predicate' have been used by philosophers to make at least three different negative claims: one about a first-level phenomenon possessed by objects like horses, stones, you and me; another about the logical form of assertions of existence; and (...)
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  12. How is the Question 'is Existence a Predicate?' Relevant to the Ontological Argument?J. William Forgie - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (3):117 - 133.
    It is often said that the ontological argument fails because it wrongly treats existence as a first-level property or predicate. This has proved a controversial claim, and efforts to evaluate it are complicated by the fact that the words ‘existence is not a property/predicate’ have been used by philosophers to make at least three different negative claims: (a) one about a first-level phenomenon possessed by objects like horses, stones, you and me; (b) another about the logical form of assertions of (...)
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  13.  18
    Hyper–Kantianism in Recent Discussions of Mystical Experience.J. William Forgie - 1985 - Religious Studies 21 (2):205 - 218.
    Much work on mystical experience has taken for granted a certain view about the relation between experience and its interpretation. This ‘traditional view’ has received perhaps its most explicit statement in Stace's Mysticism and Philosophy . It is a view which is attractive to proponents of the doctrine of unanimity, the doctrine that at the phenomenological level all mystical experiences are basically similar. Recently, however, in a growing body of literature, the traditional view has come under heavy fire. Its critics (...)
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  14. Gassendi and Kant on Existence.William Forgie - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (4):511 - 523.
    : In rejecting Descartes's ontological proof for the existence of God, Gassendi maintained that existence is not a property and Kant said that it is not a "real predicate." It is commonly supposed that both are making the same claim. Some have even thought that they advance essentially the same argument for that same claim. I believe none of this is correct. Gassendi and Kant offer different arguments. And they are arguing for different conclusions. These differences stem from a more (...)
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  15.  90
    Frege's Objection to the Ontological Argument.J. William Forgie - 1972 - Noûs 6 (3):251-265.
    Frege argued that 1) in making existence assertions we ascribe (or deny) the second-Level property, 'not being empty', To a first-Level concept. He inferred from this that 2) existence is a second-Level property, The property 'not being empty'. He therefore rejected the ontological proof of the existence of God because, He claimed, It depends on the assumption that existence is a first-Level, And not a second-Level, Property. In this paper it is argued, First, That frege is unsuccessful in his attempt (...)
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  16.  24
    Existence and Properties.J. William Forgie - 1977 - New Scholasticism 51 (1):102-116.
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  17.  34
    Existence Assertions and the Ontological Argument.J. William Forgie - 1974 - Mind 83:260.
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  18.  53
    Wittgenstein on Naming and Ostensive Definition.J. William Forgie - 1976 - International Studies in Philosophy 8:13-26.
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  19.  44
    The Principle of Credulity and the Evidential Value of Religious Experience.J. William Forgie - 1986 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 19 (3):145 - 159.
  20.  89
    The Modal Ontological Argument and the Necessary a Posteriori.J. William Forgie - 1991 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 29 (3):129 - 141.
  21.  29
    Thestic Experience and the Doctrine Of Unanimity.J. William Forgie - 1984 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (1/2):13 - 30.
  22.  44
    The Caterus Objection.J. William Forgie - 1990 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 28 (2):81 - 104.
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  23.  46
    The Cosmological and Ontological Arguments: How Saint Thomas Solved the Kantian Problem.J. William Forgie - 1995 - Religious Studies 31 (1):89 - 100.
    Let us call the Dependency Theses (DT) the view, first stated by Kant, that certain versions of the cosmological argument depend on the ontological argument. At least two different reasons have been given for the supposed dependence. Given the DT, some of Aquinas' views about God's essence, and about our knowledge of God's existence, can seem, at least at first, to be inconsistent. I consider two different ways of defending Aquinas against this suspicion of inconsistency. On the first defence, based (...)
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  24.  25
    The Alleged Dependency of the Cosmological Argument on the Ontological.J. William Forgie - 2003 - Faith and Philosophy 20 (3):364-370.
  25.  20
    Pike's Mystic Union and the Possibility of Theistic Experience.J. William Forgie - 1994 - Religious Studies 30 (2):231 - 242.
    In his long-awaited Mystic Union , Nelson Pike offers a phenomenology of mysticism. His account is based on the reports and descriptions of third parties, not on his own, first-person experience. So he calls his enterprise ‘phenomenography’, an attempt to describe the experiential content of conscious states by way of reports of them. Pike finds in the Christian mystical tradition three different kinds of experiences of mystic union, the ‘prayer of quiet’, the ‘prayer of union’ and ‘rapture’. These experiences differ (...)
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  26.  58
    Kant Chastened But Vindicated: Rejoinder to Forgie.William F. Vallicella - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (1):98-104.
  27.  33
    Is Theistic Experience Phenomenologically Possible?Kevin Corcoran - 1996 - Religious Studies 32 (4):449 - 461.
    In this paper I examine the phenomenological possibility of peculiarly theistic experience. I present and explicate William Forgie's very powerful arguments against the possibility of such experience and Nelson Pike's recent response to Forgie. I argue that although Pike's refutation of Forgie ultimately miscarries, there are good reasons for rejecting what is the central thesis upon which all of Forgie's arguments rest. After canvasing several of these reasons and recommending an alternative thesis, I conclude that (...)
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  28. William of Ockham: Questions on Virtue, Moral Goodness, and the Will.William - 2021 - Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
    William of Ockham (d. 1347) was among the most influential and the most notorious thinkers of the late Middle Ages. In the twenty-seven questions translated in this volume, most never before published in English, he considers a host of theological and philosophical issues, including the nature of virtue and vice, the relationship between the intellect and the will, the scope of human freedom, the possibility of God's creating a better world, the role of love and hatred in practical reasoning, (...)
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  29.  50
    William James’ Philosophy of Science.William J. Gavin - 1978 - New Scholasticism 52 (3):413-420.
    Although william james wrote no complete philosophy of science, nonetheless there exist in his writings several references to scientific procedure. furthermore, these are anti-positivistic in tone. these references include: 1) a rejection of the old baconian model for science; 2) an assertion that competing conceptual models of experience exist, each one of which can account for the empirical data in question; 3) nonetheless, a refusal either to reduce different conceptual theories to one conceptual outlook, or to reduce conceptual models (...)
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  30.  8
    Caleb Williams.William Godwin (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Caleb Williams is a psychological thriller and suspenseful tale of detection and pursuit. It is also a powerful political novel, inspired by the events following the French Revolution. This new edition reprints the original novel of 1794, the grittier, topical text that reflects Godwin's political philosophy.
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  31. William James and the Uncertain Universe.William J. Leonhirth - 2001 - In David K. Perry (ed.), American Pragmatism and Communication Research. L. Erlbaum. pp. 89--110.
     
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  32.  15
    William James in Focus: Willing to Believe.William J. Gavin - 2013 - Indiana University Press.
    Distilling the main currents of James's thought, William J. Gavin focuses on "latent" and "manifest" ideas in James to disclose the notion of "will to believe," which courses through his work.
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  33.  20
    William James and the Reinstatement of the Vague.William Joseph GAVIN - 1992 - Temple University Press.
    Recently, the work of philosopher-psychologist William James has undergone something of a renaissance. In this contribution to the trend, William Gavin argues that James's plea for the "reinstatement of the vague" to its proper place in our experience should be regarded as a seminal metaphor for his thought in general. The concept of vagueness applies to areas of human experience not captured by facts that can be scientifically determined nor by ideas that can be formulated in words. In (...)
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  34.  1
    William E. Connolly: Democracy, Pluralism and Political Theory.William E. Connolly - 2007 - Routledge.
    William E. Connolly’s writings have pushed the leading edge of political theory, first in North America and then in Europe as well, for more than two decades now. This book draws on his numerous influential books and articles to provide a coherent and comprehensive overview of his significant contribution to the field of political theory. The book focuses in particular on three key areas of his thinking: Democracy: his work in democratic theory - through his critical challenges to the (...)
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  35.  14
    William E. Connolly: Democracy, Pluralism & Political Theory.William E. Connolly - 2007 - Routledge.
    William E. Connolly’s writings have pushed the leading edge of political theory, first in North America and then in Europe as well, for more than two decades now. This book draws on his numerous influential books and articles to provide a coherent and comprehensive overview of his significant contribution to the field of political theory. The book focuses in particular on three key areas of his thinking: Democracy: his work in democratic theory - through his critical challenges to the (...)
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  36. A William Ernest Hocking Reader: With Commentary.William Ernest Hocking - 2004 - Vanderbilt University Press.
    Leading Harvard philosophy professor William Ernest Hocking (1873-1966), author of 17 books and in his day second only to John Dewey in the breadth of his thinking, is now largely forgotten, and his once-influential writings are out of print. This volume, which combines a rich selection of Hocking’s work with incisive essays by distinguished scholars, seeks to recover Hocking’s valuable contributions to philosophical thought.
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  37.  16
    William of Sherwood's Treatise on Syncategorematic Words.William Shirwood - 1968 - Minneapolis, MN, USA: Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.
    Translator's Introduction This book may be studied independently, but in several respects it is a companion volume to my William of Sherwood's Introduction ...
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  38.  2
    William Penn, 17th Century Founding Father: Selections From His Political Writings.William Penn - 1975 - Pendle Hill Publications.
  39.  21
    William Ockham.William A. Frank - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):817-818.
    This massive study makes an important contribution to the history of philosophy for two reasons. First of all, it stands as the most complete and careful philosophical analysis of Ockham's thought to date. Adams's expositions and analyses will become the gloss which generations of students will have to reckon with as they confront the text of Ockham. Secondly, this work represents an exemplary method of philosophical commentary, one that proves to be a remarkably illuminating way into the mind of a (...)
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  40. William P. Alston's Epistemology of Religious Experience: The Problem of Subjectivism.William Mckenith - 2004 - Dissertation, Drew University
    William P. Alston's book, Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience , challenges the contemporary view that religious experience is purely subjective. He theorizes that a direct experiential awareness of God can produce immediately justified beliefs about God. Accordingly, this dissertation critically assesses the problem of subjectivism thought to taint Alston's epistemology of religious experience. ;Upon disclosing the prevalence of subjectivity, and identifying the potential for objectivity in religious experience, this treatise produces a viable resolve for objectivity in mystical (...)
     
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  41.  1
    William Morris on Art & Design.William Morris & Christine Poulson - 1996 - Sheffield Academic Press.
    A collection of William Morris' letters and lectures on his home furnishings firm, stained glass, textiles, furnishing and decorating a house, printing, and art and society.
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  42. William James as a Man of Letters.William S. Ament - 1942 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 23 (2):199.
     
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  43. William Channing Woodbridge: Geographer.William D. Walters - 1993 - Journal of Social Studies Research 16:42-47.
  44. William of Ockham, Predestination, God's Foreknowledge, and Future Contingents.William of Ockham - 1969 - New York, NY, USA: Appleton.
  45. William James, God and Actual Possibility.William J. Gavin - 1981 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 55:239.
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  46. William James, Dieu et la possibilité actuelle.William J. Gavin - 1989 - Archives de Philosophie 52 (4):529.
     
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  47. William James and the Reinstatement of the Vague.William Joseph GAVIN - 1992 - Philosophy 68 (264):253-256.
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  48. William James and the Indeterminacy of Language and "The Really Real".William J. Gavin - 1976 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 50:208.
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  49.  7
    William James, 1842–1910.William J. Gavin - 2004 - In Armen Marsoobian & John Ryder (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to American Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 101.
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  50. William Andrew Paringer, "John Dewey and the Paradox of Liberal Reform". [REVIEW]William J. Gavin - 1991 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 27 (3):393.
     
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