173 found
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  1. The Emergent Self.William Hasker - 2001 - Cornell University Press.
    In The Emergent Self, William Hasker joins one of the most heated debates in contemporary analytic philosophy, that over the nature of mind.
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  2. Providence, Evil and the Openness of God.William Hasker - 2008 - Faith and Philosophy 25 (3):350-356.
    Providence, Evil and the Openness of God is a timely exploration of the philosophical implications of the rapidly-growing theological movement known as open theism, or the 'openness of God'. William Hasker, one of the philosophers prominently associated with this movement, presents the strengths of this position in comparison with its main competitors: Calvinism, process theism, and the theory of divine middle knowledge, or Molinism. The author develops alternative approaches to the problem of evil and to the problem of divine action (...)
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  3.  81
    God, Time and Knowledge.William Hasker - 1989 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    ... or engenders a tradition of philosophical reflection, questions will arise about the relation between divine knowledge and power and human freedom. ...
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  4. All Too Skeptical Theism.William Hasker - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1-3):15-29.
    Skeptical theism contends that, due to our cognitive limitations, we cannot expect to be able to determine whether there are reasons which justify God’s permission of apparently unjustified evils. Because this is so, the existence of these evils does not constituted evidence against God’s existence. A common criticism is that the skeptical theist is implicitly committed to other, less palatable forms of skepticism, especially moral skepticism. I examine a recent defense against this charge mounted by Michael Bergmann. I point out (...)
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  5.  18
    Defining ‘Gratuitous Evil’: A Response to Alan R. Rhoda: William Hasker.William Hasker - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (3):303-309.
    In his article, ‘Gratuitous evil and divine providence’, Alan Rhoda claims to have produced an uncontroversial theological premise for the evidential argument from evil. I argue that his premise is by no means uncontroversial among theists, and I doubt that any premise can be found that is both uncontroversial and useful for the argument from evil.
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  6. The Necessity of Gratuitous Evil.William Hasker - 1992 - Faith and Philosophy 9 (1):23-44.
  7.  25
    Objections to Social Trinitarianism.William Hasker - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (4):421 - 439.
    This article reviews a number of objections to social Trinitarianism that have been presented in the recent literature, especially objections alleging that social Trinitarianism is not truly monotheistic. A number of the objections are found to be successful so far as they go, but they apply only to some versions of social Trinitarianism and not to all. Objections to social Trinitarianism as such, on the other hand, are not successful. The article concludes with a proposal for a social Trinitarian conception (...)
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  8. Reason and Religious Belief: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion.Michael Peterson, William Hasker, Bruce Reichenbach & David Basinger - 2008 - Oxford University Press USA.
    What is the status of belief in God? Must a rational case be made or can such belief be properly basic? Is it possible to reconcile the concept of a good God with evil and suffering? In light of great differences among religions, can only one religion be true? The most comprehensive work of its kind, Reason and Religious Belief, now in its fourth edition, explores these and other perennial questions in the philosophy of religion. Drawing from the best in (...)
     
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  9. Persons and the Unity of Consciousness.William Hasker - 2010 - In Robert C. Koons & George Bealer (eds.), The Waning of Materialism: New Essays. Oxford University Press.
     
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  10.  19
    The Openness of God: A Biblical Challenge to the Traditional Understanding of God.Clark Pinnock, Richard Rice, John Sanders, William Hasker & David Basinger - 1994 - Downers Grove: Intervarsity Press.
    Written by five scholars whose expertise extends across the disciplines of biblical, historical, systematic, and philosophical theology, this is a careful and ...
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  11.  16
    “The (Non)-Existence of Molinist Counterfactuals”.William Hasker - 2011 - In Ken Perszyk (ed.), Molinism: The Contemporary Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 25--37.
  12.  87
    A New Anti-Molinist Argument.William Hasker - 1999 - Religious Studies 35 (3):291-297.
    An argument is given showing that, on the assumptions of Molinism, human beings must bring about the truth of the counterfactuals of freedom that govern their actions. But, it is claimed, it is impossible for humans to do this, and so Molinism is involved in a contradiction. The Molinist must maintain, on the contrary, that we can indeed bring about the truth of counterfactuals of freedom about us. This question turns out to depend on whether the counterfactuals of freedom are, (...)
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  13.  66
    Defining 'Gratuitous Evil': A Response to Alan R. Rhoda.William Hasker - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (3):303-309.
    In his article, 'Gratuitous evil and divine providence', Alan Rhoda claims to have produced an uncontroversial theological premise for the evidential argument from evil. I argue that his premise is by no means uncontroversial among theists, and I doubt that any premise can be found that is both uncontroversial and useful for the argument from evil.
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  14.  14
    Deception and the Trinity: A Rejoinder to Tuggy.William Hasker - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (1):117 - 120.
    Dale Tuggy argues that his divine-deception argument against social Trinitarianism remains unscathed, in spite of my recent objections. I maintain that his argument is question-begging and exegetically weak, and does not succeed in refuting social Trinitarianism.
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  15.  59
    Can God Be Free?: Rowe's Dilemma for Theology.William Hasker - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (4):453-462.
    In his book, Can God Be Free?, William Rowe has argued that if God is unsurpassably good He cannot be free; if He is free, He cannot be unsurpassably good. After following the discussion of this topic through a number of historical figures, Rowe focuses on the recent and contemporary debate. A key claim of Rowe's is that, if there exists an endless series of better and better creatable worlds, then the existence of a morally perfect creator is impossible. I (...)
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  16.  64
    Is Divine Simplicity a Mistake?William Hasker - 2016 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 90 (4):699-725.
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  17.  27
    Materialism and the Resurrection: Are the Prospects Improving?William Hasker - 2011 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (1):83 - 103.
    In 1999 Dean Zimmerman proposed a "falling elevator model" for a bodily resurrection consistent with materialism. Recently, he has defended the model against objections, and a slightly different version has been defended by Timothy O’Connor and Jonathan Jacobs. This article considers both sets of responses, and finds them at best partially successful; a new objection, not previously discussed, is also introduced. It is concluded that the prospects for the falling-elevator model, in either version, are not bright.
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  18. The Antinomies of Divine Providence.William Hasker - 2002 - Philosophia-Christi 4 (2):361-375.
     
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  19. The Foreknowledge Conundrum.William Hasker - 2001 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 50 (1/3):97-114.
  20.  3
    Can a Latin Trinity Be Social? A Response to Scott M. Williams in Advance.William Hasker - forthcoming - Faith and Philosophy.
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  21. The Emergent Self.William Hasker - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):734-736.
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  22.  68
    Is Christianity Probable? Swinburne's Apologetic Programme.William Hasker - 2002 - Religious Studies 38 (3):253-264.
    Richard Swinburne's tetralogy on Christian doctrine, together with his earlier trilogy on the philosophy of theism, is one of the most important apologetic projects of recent times. This paper focuses on some difficulties with this project that stem from Swinburne's use of confirmation theory. Arguably, the problem of dwindling probabilities, pointed out by Plantinga, has not been solved. The paper is principally focused, however, on the ways in which Swinburne's confirmation theory contributes to his comparative neglect of the personal, existential (...)
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  23.  8
    Deception and the Trinity: A Rejoinder to Tuggy: William Hasker.William Hasker - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (1):117-120.
    Dale Tuggy argues that his divine-deception argument against Social Trinitarianism remains unscathed, in spite of my recent objections. I maintain that his argument is question-begging and exegetically weak, and does not succeed in refuting Social Trinitarianism.
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  24. Intelligent Design.William Hasker - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (3):586-597.
    The intelligent design movement aspires to create a new scientific paradigm which will replace the existing Darwinian paradigm of evolution by random mutation and natural selection. However, the creation of such a paradigm is hampered by the fact that the movement pursues a 'big tent' strategy that refuses to make a choice between young-earth creationism, old-earth (progressive) creationism, and divinely directed natural selection. The latter two options are discussed in some detail, and it becomes apparent that either one presents difficult (...)
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  25.  48
    A Leftovian Trinity?William Hasker - 2009 - Faith and Philosophy 26 (2):154-166.
    Brian Leftow has proposed a “Latin” doctrine of the Trinity according to which “the Father just is God,” and so also for the Son and the Spirit. I argue that Leftow’s doctrine as he presents it really does have the consequence that Father, Son, and Spirit are all identical, a consequence that is inconsistent with orthodox Trinitarianism. A fairly minor modification would enable Leftow to avoid this untoward consequence. But the doctrine as modified will still retain a strongly modalistic flavor: (...)
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  26. D. Z. Phillips' Problems with Evil and with God.William Hasker - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (3):151 - 160.
    It is widely held that the logical problem of evil, which alleges an inconsistency between the existence of evil and that of an omnipotent and morally perfect God, has been solved. D. Z. Phillips thinks this is a mistake. In The Problem of Evil and the Problem of God, he argues that, within the generally assumed framework, “neither the proposition ’God is omnipotent’ nor the proposition ‘God is perfectly good’ can get off the ground.” Thus, the problem of evil leads (...)
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  27.  8
    "God's Only Begotten Son": A Reply to R. T. Mullins.William Hasker - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (4):217-237.
    R. T. Mullins objects, as do a number of contemporary evangelical theologians, to the doctrine of “processions in God.” In my recent book on the Trinity I affirmed and defended this doctrine. Mullins has provided a lengthy critique of my defense, and this is my reply. The reply comprises four main elements. First, there is a brief summary of the doctrine of processions. This is followed by a consideration of the three principal objections to the doctrine developed by Mullins. Next, (...)
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  28.  11
    Which God? What Power? A Response to Andrew H. Gleeson.William Hasker - 2010 - Sophia 49 (3):433-445.
    Andrew H. Gleeson has written an essay commenting on an exchange between Dewi Z. Phillips and me, arguing that I was mistaken to dismiss Phillips’ criticism of the standard definition of omnipotence as unsuccessful. Furthermore, he charges Swinburne, me, and analytic theists in general, with an excessive anthropomorphism that obliterates the distinction between Creator and creature. In response, I contend that all of Gleeson’s criticisms are unsound.
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  29.  66
    A Refutation of Middle Knowledge.William Hasker - 1986 - Noûs 20 (4):545-557.
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  30.  27
    Katherin A. Rogers Anselm on Freedom . (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008). Pp. 217. £40.00 (Hbk). Isbn 978 0 19 923167. [REVIEW]William Hasker - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (4):499-504.
  31.  13
    D. Z. Phillips’ Problems with Evil and with God.William Hasker - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (3):151-160.
    It is widely held that the logical problem of evil, which alleges an inconsistency between the existence of evil and that of an omnipotent and morally perfect God, has been solved. D. Z. Phillips thinks this is a mistake. In "The Problem of Evil and the Problem of God," he argues that, within the generally assumed framework, "neither the proposition 'God is omnipotent' nor the proposition 'God is perfectly good' can get off the ground." Thus, the problem of evil leads (...)
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  32.  29
    Yes, God has Beliefs!William Hasker - 1988 - Religious Studies 24 (3):385.
    It is beyond question that most ordinary religious believers would find talk about God as having beliefs strange, puzzling, and objectionable. God doesn't believe things, he knows them, and if some philosophers, overlooking or ignoring this obvious point, still speak of God as having beliefs – well, that says something about those philosophers! Recently this view of the ordinary believer has received help from an unexpected source, namely William P. Alston, who in his paper, ‘Does God Have Beliefs?’ makes a (...)
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  33.  46
    Foreknowledge and Necessity.William Hasker - 1985 - Faith and Philosophy 2 (2):121-156.
  34.  54
    Hard Facts and Theological Fatalism.William Hasker - 1988 - Noûs 22 (3):419-436.
  35.  14
    Of Natural Evil.William Hasker - 2011 - In Ken Perszyk (ed.), Molinism: The Contemporary Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 281.
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  36. Afterlife.WIlliam Hasker - 2010 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Human beings, like all other organic creatures, die and their bodies decay. Nevertheless, there is a widespread and long-standing belief that in some way death is survivable, that there is “life after death.” The focus in this article is on the possibility that the individual who dies will somehow continue to live, or will resume life at a later time, and not on the specific forms such an afterlife might take. We begin by considering the logical possibility of survival, given (...)
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  37.  12
    Anti-Molinist Arguments.William Hasker - 2011 - In Ken Perszyk (ed.), Molinism: The Contemporary Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 73.
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  38.  25
    Middle Knowledge.William Hasker - 1995 - Faith and Philosophy 12 (2):223-236.
    This paper carries forward the discussion initiated by the publication in 1986 of “A Refutation of Middle Knowledge.” Answers are given to two objections that have been raised against the original argument. Next, an alternative argument by Robert Adams is discussed; this argument has the advantage of avoiding reliance on one of the most controversial premises of the original argument. Finally, a definition is given for “S brings it about that Y,” and this definition is used to construct a proof (...)
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  39.  20
    A Compositional Incarnation.William Hasker - 2017 - Religious Studies 53 (4):433-447.
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  40.  56
    The Constitution View of Persons: A Critique.William Hasker - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):23-34.
    This paper discusses the “constitution view” of human persons, as set forth by Lynne Rudder Baker in her book, Persons and Bodies. The metaphysical notion of constitution is explained and briefly defended. It is shown, however, that the view that human persons are constituted by their bodies faces difficulties in specifying the “person-favorable conditions” under which a human body constitutes a person. Furthermore, none of the arguments in support of the claim that humans are constituted by (but not identical with) (...)
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  41. How Not to Be a Reductivist.William Hasker - 2003 - Progress in Complexity, Information, and Design 2.
  42. The Many Gods of Hick and Mavrodes.William Hasker - 2011 - In Kelly James Clark & Raymond J. VanArragon (eds.), Evidence and Religious Belief. Oxford University Press.
  43.  24
    The Foundations of Theism.William Hasker - 1998 - Faith and Philosophy 15 (1):52-67.
    In the extensive literature that has accumulated around Reformed epistemology, some of the most interesting material is found in the debate on the foundations of theism between Philip Quinn and Alvin Plantinga. This essay assesses that debate and draws some tentative conclusions.
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  44. The Absence of a Timeless God.William Hasker - 2002 - In Gregory E. Ganssle & David M. Woodruff (eds.), God and Time: Essays on the Divine Nature. Oxford University Press. pp. 182--206.
     
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  45.  63
    Suffering, Soul-Making, and Salvation.William Hasker - 1988 - International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (1):3-19.
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  46.  65
    Are Alternative Pasts Plausible? A Reply to Thomas Flint.William Hasker - 2000 - Religious Studies 36 (1):103-105.
    Thomas Flint has claimed that my argument against Molinism suffers from a 'seemingly irreparable logical gap'. He also contests a key assumption of that argument, namely that 'something which has had causal consequences in the past is ipso facto a hard, fixed, settled fact about the past'. In reply, I show that there is no logical gap at all in the argument. And I argue that, even though Molinists have reasons, based on Molinist principles, for rejecting the assumption in question, (...)
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  47.  2
    God, Time and Knowledge.Brian Leftow & William Hasker - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (2):444.
  48.  7
    Analytic Philosophy of Religion.William Hasker - 2005 - In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. pp. 421--46.
    Analytic philosophy of religion was gestated in the nineteen forties, born in the early fifties, spent its childhood in the sixties, and its adolescence in the seventies and early eighties. Since then it has grown into adulthood, and it reached the turn of the millennium in a state of vigorous maturity, with decline and senile degeneration nowhere in sight. This chapter unpacks this metaphor by tracing the main stages in the development of this discipline, beginning with the preoccupation with religious (...)
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  49.  1
    The Emergent Self.William Hasker - 2000 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 48 (2):125-129.
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  50.  46
    Concerning the Unity of Consciousness.William Hasker - 1995 - Faith and Philosophy 12 (4):532-547.
    Ever since Descartes there have been philosophers who have claimed that the unity of conscious experience argues strongly against the possibility that the mind or self is a material thing. My contention is that the recent neglect of this argument is a mistake, and that it places a serious and perhaps insuperable obstacle in the way of materialist theories of the mind.
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