Results for 'William J. Goode'

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  1.  41
    Mysticism and Sense Perception: WILLIAM J. WAINWRIGHT.William J. Wainwright - 1973 - Religious Studies 9 (3):257-278.
    In this paper I propose to examine the cognitive status of mystical experience. There are, I think, three distinct but overlapping sorts of religious experience. In the first place, there are two kinds of mystical experience. The extrovertive or nature mystic identifies himself with a world which is both transfigured and one. The introvertive mystic withdraws from the world and, after stripping the mind of concepts and images, experiences union with something which can be described as an undifferentiated unity. Introvertive (...)
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  2. William J. Goode, "The Celebration of Heroes: Prestige as a Social Control System". [REVIEW]Thomas Burger - 1982 - Theory and Society 11 (5):719.
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  3. Debunking Evolutionary Debunking of Ethical Realism.William J. FitzPatrick - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (4):883-904.
    What implications, if any, does evolutionary biology have for metaethics? Many believe that our evolutionary background supports a deflationary metaethics, providing a basis at least for debunking ethical realism. Some arguments for this conclusion appeal to claims about the etiology of the mental capacities we employ in ethical judgment, while others appeal to the etiology of the content of our moral beliefs. In both cases the debunkers’ claim is that the causal roles played by evolutionary factors raise deep epistemic problems (...)
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  4.  9
    The Presence of Evil and the Falsification of Theistic Assertions: WILLIAM J. WAINWRIGHT.William J. Wainwright - 1969 - Religious Studies 4 (2):213-216.
    The falsifiability of theistic assertions no longer appears to be the burning issue it once was, and perhaps this is all to the good. For one thing, it was never entirely clear just what demand was being made of the theist. In this paper I shall not discuss the nature or legitimacy of the falsification requirement as applied to theistic assertions. Instead I shall argue that some of the reasons which have been offered to show that these assertions are not (...)
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  5. A Triage Theory of Grading: The Good, the Bad, and the Middling.William J. Rapaport - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (4):347–372.
    This essay presents and defends a triage theory of grading: An item to be graded should get full credit if and only if it is clearly or substantially correct, minimal credit if and only if it is clearly or substantially incorrect, and partial credit if and only if it is neither of the above; no other (intermediate) grades should be given. Details on how to implement this are provided, and further issues in the philosophy of grading (reasons for and against (...)
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  6. Skepticism About Naturalizing Normativity: In Defense of Ethical Nonnaturalism.William J. Fitzpatrick - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (4):559-588.
    There is perhaps no more widely shared conviction in contemporary metaethics, even among those who hold otherwise divergent views, than that practical normativity must be capable of being naturalized . My aim is to illuminate the central reasons for skepticism about this. While certain naturalizing projects are plausible for very limited purposes, it is unlikely that any can provide everything we might reasonably want from an account of goodness and badness, rightness and wrongness, and unqualified reasons for acting—at least if (...)
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  7. Thomson's Turnabout on the Trolley.William J. FitzPatrick - 2009 - Analysis 69 (4):636-643.
    The famous ‘trolley problem’ began as a simple variation on an example given in passing by Philippa Foot , involving a runaway trolley that cannot be stopped but can be steered to a path of lesser harm. By switching from the perspective of the driver to that of a bystander, Judith Jarvis Thomson showed how the case raises difficulties for the normative theory Foot meant to be defending, and Thomson compounded the challenge with further variations that created still more puzzles (...)
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  8.  95
    Teaching Virtue: Pedagogical Implications of Moral Psychology. [REVIEW]William J. Frey - 2010 - Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (3):611-628.
    Moral exemplar studies of computer and engineering professionals have led ethics teachers to expand their pedagogical aims beyond moral reasoning to include the skills of moral expertise. This paper frames this expanded moral curriculum in a psychologically informed virtue ethics. Moral psychology provides a description of character distributed across personality traits, integration of moral value into the self system, and moral skill sets. All of these elements play out on the stage of a social surround called a moral ecology. Expanding (...)
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  9.  63
    Public Schools and the Common Good.William J. Reese - 1988 - Educational Theory 38 (4):431-440.
  10. Requirements on Reality.J. Robert G. Williams - 2012 - In Fabrice Correia Benjamin Schnieder (ed.), Metaphysical Grounding: Understanding the Structure of Reality. Cambridge University Press. pp. 165-185.
    There are advantages to thrift over honest toil. If we can make do without numbers we avoid challenging questions over the metaphysics and epistemology of such entities; and we have a good idea, I think, of what a nominalistic metaphysics should look like. But minimizing ontology brings its own problems; for it seems to lead to error theory— saying that large swathes of common-sense and best science are false. Should recherche philosophical arguments really convince us to give all this up? (...)
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  11. How to Study: A Brief Guide.William J. Rapaport - 2011 - World Wide Web.
    Everyone has a different "learning style". (A good introduction to the topic of learning styles is Claxton & Murrell 1987. For more on different learning styles, see Keirsey Temperament and Character Web Site, William Perry's Scheme of Intellectual and Ethical Development, Holland 1966, Kolb 1984, Sternberg 1999. For an interesting discussion of some limitations of learning styles from the perspective of teaching styles, see Glenn 2009/2010.) For some online tools targeted at different learning styles, see "100 Helpful Web Tools (...)
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  12.  5
    On the Appropriate Social Responsibilities of Successful Entrepreneurs.William J. Baumol - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (1):14-22.
    This article offers proposed guidelines intended to protect the public interest in relationship to the advocated social responsibilities of successful entrepreneurs. The author argues that the most effective approach, then, is not preaching about obligations but, rather, establishing financial incentives for doing well by doing good. One example is the U.S. patent system. Another is a redesigned tax system that uses imposts to make socially damaging activities expensive, while reducing the financial burden on virtuous behavior.
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  13. Vagueness as Indecision.J. Robert G. Williams - 2016 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 90 (1):285-309.
    This essay explores the thesis that for vague predicates, uncertainty over whether a borderline instance x of red/large/tall/good is to be understood as practical uncertainty over whether to treat x as red/large/tall/good. Expressivist and quasi-realist treatments of vague predicates due to John MacFarlane and Daniel Elstein provide the stalking-horse. It examines the notion of treating/counting a thing as F , and links a central question about our attitudes to vague predications to normative evaluation of plans to treat a thing as (...)
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  14.  21
    What Can Particle Physicists Count On?David Gooding, William J. McKinney, Harry M. Marks, Jeff Hughes & Alan Chalmers - 1999 - Metascience 8 (3):356-392.
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  15. Prediction and Rolston’s Environmental Ethics: Lessons From the Philosophy of Science.William J. McKinney - 1996 - Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):429-440.
    Rolston (1988) argues that in order to act ethically in the environment, moral agents must assume that their actions are potentially harmful, and then strive to prove otherwise before implementing that action. In order to determine whether or not an action in the environment is harmful requires the tools of applied epistemology in order to act in accord with Rolston’s ethical prescription. This link between ethics and epistemology demands a closer look at the relationship between confirmation theory, particularly notions of (...)
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  16. Pt. 2. Human Goods and Human Flourishing : Revitalizing a Fallen Moral Culture. Quid Ipse Sis Nosse Desisti / Douglas V. Henry ; Preparation for the Cure / Anthony E. Giampietro ; Diagnosing Cultural Progress and Decline. [REVIEW]William J. Zanardi - 2009 - In Mark J. Cherry (ed.), The Normativity of the Natural: Human Goods, Human Virtues, and Human Flourishing. Springer.
     
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  17.  39
    God and Personality.William J. Mander - 1997 - Heythrop Journal 38 (4):401–412.
    Among the traditional list of divine attributes it is commonly said that God is a person. Making a distinction between being a person and having a personality, it is argued that God cannot be a person because it makes no sense to think of him as having a personality. Problems with the notion of divine personality are considered stemming from God’s perfection, his infinity, his omniscience, his rationality, his morally good nature and his gender neutrality. Three generic types of response (...)
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  18.  41
    Rowe on God’s Freedom and God’s Grace.William J. Wainwright - 2005 - Philo 8 (1):12-22.
    Rowe argues that if for every good world there is a better, then God is not morally perfect since no matter what world God were to create he could have done better than he did. I contend that Rowe’s argument doesn’t do justice to the role grace plays in the theist’s doctrine of creation, and respond to five new criticisms of my position that Rowe offers in Can God be Free?
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  19.  15
    Nietzsche’s Speech of Indirection: Commentary on Laurence Lampert’s “Beyond Good and Evil: Nietzsche’s ’Free Spirit‘ Mask”.William J. Zanardi - 1984 - International Studies in Philosophy 16 (2):53-56.
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  20.  5
    Game Play, Wholehearted Engagement, and the Good Life.William J. Morgan - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-13.
    One of the many brilliant insights of C. Thi Nguyen’s brilliant book, Games: Agency as Art, is the connection he draws between the distinctive agency of game play and one important feature of a lif...
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  21.  53
    Comments on I. J. Good.William L. Harper - 1975 - Synthese 30 (1-2):75 - 78.
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  22.  29
    Some Narrative Methodologies for Clinical Ethics.William J. Ellos - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (3):315-322.
    The increasing role played by medical ethicists in the clinical setting both as teachers and consultants has brought with it a demand for new methodologies that speak more precisely to the multiple problems encountered in actual attempts at case resolution. Some of these moves have to do with a revival of the truly classic case study approach to ethics, casuistry. This approach is anchored in the revelatory text of Jonsen and Toulmin, TheAbuseofCasuistry. A fine example of this methodology is an (...)
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  23.  19
    " I Am Spartacus"–Privacy Enhancing Technologies and Privacy as a Public Good.Zbigniew Kwecka, William J. Buchanan & Burkhard Schafer - forthcoming - Artificial Intelligence and Law.
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  24.  55
    B. Meltzer. The Third Possibility. Mind, N.S. Vol. 73 , Pp. 430–433. - B. Meltzer and I. J. Good. Two Forms of the Prediction Paradox. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 16 No. 61 , Pp. 50–51. - William H. Halberstadt. In Defence of Euclid: A Reply to B. Meltzer. Mind, N.S. Vol. 76 , P. 282. [REVIEW]Alan Ross Anderson - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (3):458-459.
  25.  29
    Review: B. Meltzer, The Third Possibility; B. Meltzer, I. J. Good, Two Forms of the Prediction Paradox; William H. Halberstadt, In Defence of Euclid: A Reply to B. Meltzer. [REVIEW]Alan Ross Anderson - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (3):458-459.
  26.  19
    Morality And Mysticism.William J. Wainwright - 1976 - Journal of Religious Ethics 4 (1):29-36.
    Stace and others maintain that mystical consciousness reveals the identity of selves and, therefore, provides a justification for altruism. Zaehner argues that some types of mystical consciousness apparently reveal the identity of such opposites as good and evil, and Danto holds that mystical consciousness involves a transcendence of all distinctions, including moral distinctions. Thus, for both Zaehner and Danto mysticism undercuts morality. The author attempts to show that these positions are defective and suggests that there are no important epistemic or (...)
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  27.  8
    Rowe on God’s Freedom and God’s Grace.William J. Wainwright - 2005 - Philo 8 (1):12-22.
    Rowe argues that if for every good world there is a better, then God is not morally perfect since no matter what world God were to create he could have done better than he did. I contend that Rowe’s argument doesn’t do justice to the role grace plays in the theist’s doctrine of creation, and respond to five new criticisms of my position that Rowe offers in Can God be Free?
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  28.  48
    Conscious Visual Abilities in a Patient with Early Bilateral Occipital Damage.Deborah Giaschi, James E. Jan, Bruce Bjornson, Simon Au Young, Matthew Tata, Christopher J. Lyons, William V. Good & Peter K. H. Wong - 2003 - Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology 45 (11):772-781.
  29.  4
    Ethics in Sport, Third Edition.William J. Morgan - 2017 - Human Kinetics.
    A glance at the daily newspaper reveals a myriad of moral imperfections in sport. Stories on drug use, violence, scandals, and unethical practices are nearly as common as recaps of the previous day's game. "Ethics in Sport" examines these and other key issues. It is the finest and most comprehensive literature to date on the ethical issues confronting sport in contemporary society. The book includes - an examination of good sportsmanship, fair play, and cheating and their true places in today's (...)
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  30.  37
    The 'Will to Believe' in Science and Religion.William J. Gavin - 1984 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (3):139 - 148.
    “The Will to Believe” defines the religious question as forced, living and momentous, but even in this article James asserts that more objective factors are involved. The competing religious hypotheses must both be equally coherent and correspond to experimental data to an equal degree. Otherwise the option is not a live one. “If I say to you ‘Be a theosophist or be a Mohammedan’, it is probably a dead option, because for you neither hypothesis is likely to be alive.” James, (...)
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  31.  44
    Environmental Virtue Ethics with Martha Stewart.William J. Ehmann - 2001 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):51-57.
    Renewed philosophical discourse about virtue ethics motivates the search for examples to inform and extend our thinking. In the case of environmental virtue ethics, I have decided to consult “America’s Lifestyle Expert,” Martha Stewart. Oft dismissed as a pop icon or model of domesticity, Martha’s business success is arguably a result of her claimed authority on what the good life entails and how we get it. Reviewing over 60 signed “Letters From Martha” from her monthly magazine Martha Stewart Living. (MSL) (...)
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  32.  66
    Aristotle and Corruptibility: C. J. F. WILLIAMS.C. J. F. Williams - 1965 - Religious Studies 1 (1):95-107.
    In a discussion-note in Mind, Father P. M. Farrell, O.P., gave an account, in what he admitted to be an embarrassingly brief compass, of the Thomist doctrine concerning evil. There is one sentence in this discussion which at first glance appears paradoxical. Father Farrell has been arguing that a universe containing ‘corruptible good’ as well as incorruptible is better than one containing ‘incorruptible good’ only. He continues: ‘If, however, they are to manifest this corruptible good, they must be corruptible and (...)
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  33.  15
    The Authority of Law. By Joseph Raz. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1979.William J. Howard - 1982 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 27 (1):184-184.
    Whether we are morally obligated to obey the law is the central question addressed by Joseph Raz in his most recent work entitled, The Authority of Law. It is a question which divides positivists from natural law adherents. Professor Raz, a self-proclaimed positivist, concludes that “there is no general moral obligation to obey [the law], not even in a good society.” Rather, for Raz he individual must obey the law only if he respects it. “His respect,” says Raz, “is the (...)
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  34.  2
    Australian Lonergan Workshop.William J. Danaher - 1993 - Upa.
    This book contains a collection of papers from the 1985, 1987 and 1989 Australian Lonergan Workshops. Contents: A Summary of Lonergan's Economic Diagram, S.P. Burley; How Lonergan Illuminates Aristotle, T.V. Daly, S.J.; Lonergan and the Philosophy of Science, Dr. W.J. Danaher; "Transubstantiation Over Transsignification": Giovanni Sala and Edward Schillebeeckx on the Eucharistic Presence, P. Beer, S.J.; Schillebeeckx's Philosophic Prologomenon: A Dialectic Analysis, Dr. N. Ormerod; Mutual Self-Mediation with Christ, F. Fletcher, M.S.C.; The Integration of Trinitarian Theology and Spirituality, Bishop J. (...)
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  35. Individuarian Observations: Essays in Catholic Social Reflection.Rev William J. Byron - 2007 - University of Scranton Press.
    The term “individuarian” describes a person who seeks leadership in service of his community—he is neither blatantly self-interested nor blindly communistic, but seeks to contribute positively to society. In _Individuarian Observations, _William J. Byron reflects on this concept and the place of individuarians in both the Catholic Church and an American society in the midst of crises and transitions. Byron’s sharp insights propose an alternative ethical model based on engaged social participants who are committed to advancing the common good in (...)
     
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  36.  4
    A Goodly Gallerye: William Fulke's Book Of Meteors By Theodore Hornberger. [REVIEW]J. Zetterberg - 1980 - Isis 71:511-512.
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  37.  7
    A Goodly Gallerye: William Fulke's Book of Meteors. Theodore Hornberger.J. Peter Zetterberg - 1980 - Isis 71 (3):511-512.
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  38.  17
    Knowing Good and Evil.C. J. F. Williams - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (256):235 - 240.
  39.  32
    Functional Brain Mapping – What is It Good For? Plenty, but Not Everything! (Reply to Malcolm J. Avison).William R. Uttal - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (3):375-379.
  40.  58
    Moira William Chase Greene: Moira: Fate, Good, and Evil in Greek Thought. Pp. Viii+450. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Milford), 1944. Cloth, $5.00. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1945 - The Classical Review 59 (01):12-14.
  41. Comment on J. J. E. Gracia’s Hispanic/Latino Identity.Robert Gooding-Williams - 2001 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (2):3-10.
  42.  48
    What is the Harm in Harmful Conception? On Threshold Harms in Non-Identity Cases.Nicola J. Williams & John Harris - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (5):337-351.
    Has the time come to put to bed the concept of a harm threshold when discussing the ethics of reproductive decision making and the legal limits that should be placed upon it? In this commentary, we defend the claim that there exist good moral reasons, despite the conclusions of the non-identity problem, based on the interests of those we might create, to refrain from bringing to birth individuals whose lives are often described in the philosophical literature as ‘less than worth (...)
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  43.  12
    Justice and the Human Good. By William A. Galston.Vernon J. Bourke - 1983 - Modern Schoolman 60 (2):129-129.
  44.  98
    Functional Brain Mapping – What is It Good For? Absolutely Nothing? (Comments on the New Phrenology, by William R. Uttal).Malcolm J. Avison - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (3):367-373.
  45.  11
    Wheat and Chaff: The Harvest of the Faraday BicentenaryMichael Faraday: Sandemanian and Scientist: A Study of Science and Religion in the Nineteenth Century. Geoffrey CantorFaraday. Geoffrey Cantor, David Gooding, Frank A. J. L. JamesMichael Faraday and the Royal Institution: The Genius of Man and Place. John Meurig Thomas. [REVIEW]L. Pearce Williams - 1994 - Isis 85 (1):120-124.
  46.  16
    Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry.William Irwin & Jonathan J. Sanford (eds.) - 2012 - Wiley.
    Untangle the complex web of philosophical dilemmas of Spidey and his world—in time for the release of The Amazing Spider-Man movie Since Stan Lee and Marvel introduced Spider-Man in Amazing Fantasy #15 in 1962, everyone’s favorite webslinger has had a long career in comics, graphic novels, cartoons, movies, and even on Broadway. In this book some of history’s most powerful philosophers help us explore the enduring questions and issues surrounding this beloved superhero: Is Peter Parker to blame for the death (...)
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  47.  19
    A Mind of One's Own: J. R. Lucas.J. R. Lucas - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (266):457-471.
    Whatever good or ill it did to Guy Fawkes, his resuscitation at the hands of Bernard Williams has, by any utilitarian reckoning, been a Good Thing. A casual glance at the literature that has accumulated over the past thirty-five years leaves no doubt that the topic has been reduplicated many times over, to the great enjoyment of undergraduates, who have been able to write science fiction under the guise of essays in the Philosophy of Mind, and of dons, who in (...)
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  48. Is the Good Corporation Dead?: Social Responsibility in a Global Economy.John W. Houck & Oliver F. Williams (eds.) - 1996 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Can corporations remain socially responsible in today's fiercely competitive global economy? For several decades after World War II, companies like IBM, which exemplified what journalist Robert J. Samuelson called the 'good corporation,' poured forth material comforts and technological ideas while guaranteeing full employment and adequate retirement. In the 1980s all of that changed, as corporations moved to 'downsize' and become lean, mean global competitors. In this collection, thirteen prominent scholars in business ethics, finance, management, and religion and six corporate leaders (...)
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  49. The Good in Nature and Humanity: Connecting Science, Religion, and Spirituality with the Natural World.Stephen R. Kellert, Timothy J. Farnham & Timothy Farnham - 2002 - Island Press.
    The good in nature and humanity brings together 20 leading thinkers and writers - including Ursula Goodenough, Lynn Margulis, Dorion Sagan, Carl Safina, David Petersen, Wendell Berry, Terry Tempest Williams, and Barry Lopez - to examine the divide between faith and reason, and to seek a means for developing an environmental ethic that will help us confront two of our most imperiling crises: global environmental destruction and an impoverished spirituality. The book explores the ways in which science, spirit, and religion (...)
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  50.  79
    Aristotle and Corruptibility: A Discussion of Aristotle "De Caelo" I, Xii. Part II.C. J. F. Williams - 1966 - Religious Studies 1 (2):203.
    ἆρ' ∈ἰ kaì ⋯γ ∈´νητον … πρòς τò ɸθαρτόν, ⋯ϕ' ᾧΘ . Aristotle claims so far to have proved that the eternal is incorruptible and that it is ungenerated. He has still to prove the converse of each of these propositions, namely, that whatever is incorruptible is eternal and that whatever is ungenerated is eternal also. After putting the thesis in question form he gives a further definition of ⋯γ∈´νητος and ἄɸθαρτος in the parenthesis of 282 a 27–30. Unfortunately in (...)
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