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  1.  35
    Business Ethics From the Internal Point of View.William Kline - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):57-67.
    The notion that the firm, and economic activity in general, is inherently amoral is a central feature of positive economics that is also widely accepted in business ethics. Theories as disparate as stockholder and stakeholder theory both leave this central assumption unchallenged. Each theory argues for a different set of external ethical restrictions, but neither adequately provides an internal connection between business and the ethical rules business people are obliged to follow. This paper attempts to make this connection by arguing (...)
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  2.  38
    Hume's Theory of Business Ethics Revisited.William Kline - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):163-174.
    Hume’s examination of the conventions of property, trade, and contract addresses the moral foundations that make business possible. In this light, Hume’s theory of justice is also a foundational work in business ethics. In Hume’s analysis of these conventions, both philosophers and game theorists have correctly identified “proto” game-theoretic elements. One of the few attempts to offer a Humean theory of business ethics rests on this game-theoretic interpretation of Hume’s argument. This article argues that game-theoretic reasoning is only one part (...)
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  3.  40
    Do No Harm: A Defense of Markets in Healthcare. [REVIEW]William Kline - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (3):241-251.
    This paper argues that the rules that constitute a market protect autonomy and increase welfare in healthcare. Markets do the former through protecting rights to self-ownership and a cluster of rights that protect its exercise. Markets protect welfare by organizing and protecting trades. In contrast, prohibition destroys legitimate markets, giving rise to so-called black markets that harm both the autonomy and well-being of agents. For example, a fee-for-service medical system is a highly developed and specialized market. It is individuals working (...)
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  4.  13
    Book Review. [REVIEW]William Kline - 2008 - Journal of Value Inquiry 42 (1):105-110.
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  5.  6
    Collapsing Goods and the Milieu of Innovation.William Kline - 2006 - Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):181-193.
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  6. Flourishing Through Trade.William Kline - 2008 - In Aeon J. Skoble (ed.), Reading Rasmussen and Den Uyl: Critical Essays on Norms of Liberty. Lexington Books.
     
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