Results for 'William Little'

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  1.  12
    Understanding Inflation and the Implications for Monetary Policy: A Phillips Curve Retrospective.Jeff Fuhrer, Yolanda K. Kodrzycki, Jane Sneddon Little & Giovanni P. Olivei (eds.) - 2009 - MIT Press.
    In 1958, economist A. W. Phillips published an article describing what he observed to be the inverse relationship between inflation and unemployment; subsequently, the "Phillips curve" became a central concept in macroeconomic analysis and policymaking. But today's Phillips curve is not the same as the original one from fifty years ago; the economy, our understanding of price setting behavior, the determinants of inflation, and the role of monetary policy have evolved significantly since then. In this book, some of the top (...)
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  2.  29
    Shooting for Dead Time in Gus Van Sant's Elephant.William Little - 2013 - Film-Philosophy 17 (1):115-133.
    In Elephant , director Gus Van Sant dramatises a massacre at a suburban American high school in order to examine narrative cinema's ethical capacity to respond to that which resists being framed as a meaningful event. In the film, this stubborn stuff is experience shot through with contingency. Van Sant depicts acts of violence that are indiscriminate and, at best, ambiguously motivated, as well as school-day activities that appear coincidental and insignificant. This essay argues that the director aims to screen (...)
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  3.  11
    Essays on Islamic Civilization Presented to Niyazi Berkes.William C. Hickman & Donald P. Little - 1980 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 100 (2):148.
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  4.  11
    Myth and Society in Attic Drama. By A. M. G. Little. Pp. Vii + 95; 13 Text Figs. New York: Columbia University Press. London: Humphrey Milford, 1940. 10s. [REVIEW]A. M. Dale & A. M. G. Little - 1943 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 63:135-136.
  5.  18
    Restoring Humane Values to Medicine: A Miles Little Reader.Ian Kerridge, Christopher Jordens, Emma-Jane Sayers & J. M. Little (eds.) - 2003 - Desert Pea Press.
    Does reading poetry make you a better clinician?Can euthanasia be understood in terms of the meaning of a life?What is the moral and existential significance of ...
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  6. William C. Wimsatt.C. William - 1976 - In G. Gordon, Grover Maxwell & I. Savodnik (eds.), Consciousness and the Brain: A Scientific and Philosophical Inquiry. Plenum. pp. 205.
     
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  7.  4
    William Bynum, A Little History of Science. [REVIEW]Sean F. Johnston - 2013 - British Society for the History of Science Viewpoint 101:10.
  8. William Manchester, A World Lit Only by Fire. The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance: Portrait of an Age. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1992. Pp. Xvii, 318; 33 Black-and-White Illustrations, 5 Maps. $24.95. [REVIEW]Jeremy duQuesnay Adams - 1995 - Speculum 70 (1):173-174.
     
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  9. Philosophy of the Behavioral and Social Sciences: Philosophy of the Cognitive Sciences / William Bechtel and Mitchell Herschbach. Philosophy of Psychology / Edouard Machery. Philosophy of Sociology / Daniel Little. Philosophy of Economics. [REVIEW]Daniel M. Hausman - 2010 - In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Philosophies of the Sciences. Wiley-Blackwell.
  10.  84
    Taking God Seriously, but Not Too Seriously: The Divine Command Theory and William James' 'The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life’.Mark J. Boone - 2013 - William James Studies 10:1-20.
    While some scholars neglect the theological component to William James’s ethical views in “The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life,” Michael Cantrell reads it as promoting a divine command theory (DCT) of the foundations of moral obligation. While Cantrell’s interpretation is to be commended for taking God seriously, he goes a little too far in the right direction. Although James’s view amounts to what could be called (and what Cantrell does call) a DCT because on it God’s demands (...)
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  11.  88
    William James on Conceptions and Private Language.Henry Jackman - 2017 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 30:175-193.
    William James was one of the most frequently cited authors in Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations, but the attention paid to James’s Principles of Psycho- logy in that work is typically explained in terms of James having ‘committed in a clear, exemplary manner, fundamental errors in the philosophy of mind.’ (Goodman 2002, p. viii.) The most notable of these ‘errors’ was James’s purported commitment to a conception of language as ‘private’. Commentators standardly treat James as committed to a conception of language (...)
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  12.  21
    William James and the Search for Scientific Evidence of Life After Death.Gary E. Schwartz - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (11-12):11-12.
    William James’s historic fascination with psychic phenomena, including the possibility of life after death, has become more widely known with the publication of recent books and articles on this controversial aspect of his scientific legacy. However, little is known about the emerging evidence suggesting the possibility that James’s scientific interest in these topics has not waned since he died. This paper reviews preliminary observations, including two exploratory double-blinded mediumship investigations, which are consistent with the hypothesis that James (with (...)
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  13.  21
    Little Tools of Knowledge: Historical Essays on Academic and Bureaucratic Practices.Peter Becker & William Clark (eds.) - 2001 - University of Michigan Press.
    This volume brings historians of science and social historians together to consider the role of "little tools"--such as tables, reports, questionnaires, dossiers, index cards--in establishing academic and bureaucratic claims to authority and objectivity. From at least the eighteenth century onward, our science and society have been planned, surveyed, examined, and judged according to particular techniques of collecting and storing knowledge. Recently, the seemingly self-evident nature of these mundane epistemic and administrative tools, as well as the prose in which they (...)
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  14. William P. Alston's Epistemology of Religious Experience: The Problem of Subjectivism.William Mckenith - 2004 - Dissertation, Drew University
    William P. Alston's book, Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience , challenges the contemporary view that religious experience is purely subjective. He theorizes that a direct experiential awareness of God can produce immediately justified beliefs about God. Accordingly, this dissertation critically assesses the problem of subjectivism thought to taint Alston's epistemology of religious experience. ;Upon disclosing the prevalence of subjectivity, and identifying the potential for objectivity in religious experience, this treatise produces a viable resolve for objectivity in mystical (...)
     
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  15.  45
    William Astbury and the Biological Significance of Nucleic Acids, 1938–1951.Kersten Hall - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (2):119-128.
    Famously, James Watson credited the discovery of the double-helical structure of DNA in 1953 to an X-ray diffraction photograph taken by Rosalind Franklin. Historians of molecular biology have long puzzled over a remarkably similar photograph taken two years earlier by the physicist and pioneer of protein structure William T. Astbury. They have suggested that Astbury’s failure to capitalize on the photograph to solve DNA’s structure was due either to his being too much of a physicist, with too little (...)
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  16.  19
    Public Spectacle and Scientific Theory: William Robertson Smith and the Reading of Evolution in Victorian Scotland.David N. Livingstone - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (1):1-29.
    This paper examines the reaction of Victorian Presbyterian culture to the theory of evolution in late nineteenth century Scotland. Focusing on the role played by the Free Church theologian, biblical critic and anthropological theorist, William Robertson Smith, it argues that, compared with Smith’s radical scholarship, evolutionary theories did little to disturb the Scottish Calvinist mind-set. After surveying the attitudes to evolution among a range of theological leaders, the paper examines Smith’s fundamentally threatening proposals and the circumstances that led (...)
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  17. Demonstration and Scientific Knowledge in William of Ockham: A Translation of Summa Logicae Iii-Ii: De Syllogismo Demonstrativo, and Selections From the Prologue to the Ordinatio.John Lee Longeway - 2007 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    This book makes available for the first time an English translation of William of Ockham's work on Aristotle's _Posterior Analytics_, which contains his theory of scientific demonstration and philosophy of science. John Lee Longeway also includes an extensive commentary and a detailed history of the intellectual background to Ockham's work. He puts Ockham into context by providing a scholarly account of the reception and study of the _Posterior Analytics_ in the Latin Middle Ages, with a detailed discussion of Robert (...)
     
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  18.  13
    Natural Philosophy and Thermodynamics: William Thomson and ‘The Dynamical Theory of Heat’.Crosbie Smith - 1976 - British Journal for the History of Science 9 (3):293-319.
    William Thomson's image as a professional mathematical physicist who adheres, particularly in his work in classical thermodynamics, to a strict experimental basis for his science, avoids speculative hypotheses, and becomes renowned for his omission of philosophical declarations has been reinforced in varying degrees by those historians who have attempted, as either admirers or critics of Thomson, to describe and assess his life. J. G. Crowther, for example, sees him as a thinker of great intellectual strength, but deficient in intellectual (...)
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  19.  46
    William Robertson and Scientific Theism.Joshua Ehrlich - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (3):519-542.
    Scholars have hitherto found little to no place for natural philosophy in the intellectual makeup of the Enlightened historian William Robertson, overlooking his significant contacts with that province and its central relevance to the controversy surrounding David Hume and Lord Kames in the 1750s. Here I reexamine Robertson's Situation of the World at the Time of Christ's Appearance (1755) in light of these contexts. I argue that his foundational sermon drew upon the scientific theism of such thinkers as (...)
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  20.  25
    Henricus Aristippus, William of Moerbeke and Two Alleged Mediaeval Translations of Hero's Pneumatica.Edward Grant - 1971 - Speculum 46 (4):656-669.
    It has long been accepted that by the third quarter of the thirteenth century at least two Latin translations had been made from the Greek text of the Pneumatica of Hero of Alexandria. Evidence of the first of these was discovered by Valentin Rose in Henricus Aristippus' prologue to his translation of Plato's Phaedo completed in 1156. Some fifty years later, on the basis of a letter written in 1274 following the death of St Thomas Aquinas, Alexander Birkenmajer attributed a (...)
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  21.  9
    William James and Depth Psychology.Eugene Taylor - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (9-10):9-10.
    William James is best known for his Pragmatism , his Varieties of Religious Experience , and his Principles of Psychology , but little is known about his excursions into depth psychology, meaning a dynamic psychology of inner experience, despite the fact that he claimed in The Varieties that the subconscious was the primary avenue through which ultimately transforming mystical experiences occur. A survey of James's evolving conceptions of consciousness thorough the stages of his career reveals that his theories (...)
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  22.  54
    The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus (Review).Sami Pihlström - 2010 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (4):646-650.
    Although William James wrote little directly on ethics, commentators have increasingly recognized that a central current—perhaps even the main underlying orientation—of his philosophical work is ethical. The famous 1891 essay, "The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life,"1 is thus only the tip of an iceberg. It is his only article explicitly dealing with moral philosophy; yet, arguably, ethical considerations are built into the fabric of his pragmatism, especially its leading idea that theories and worldviews ought to be examined (...)
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  23.  20
    Ethnicity, Expertise and Authority: The Cases of Lewis Howard Latimer, William Preece and John Tyndall.G. Gooday - unknown
    To become an authority figure in late nineteenth century electricity, neither a higher education nor mainstream ethnic identity were necessary. This paper examines three diverse examples of Anglo-American experts/authorities who succeeded during their lifetime in at least some level of major recognition by performing publicly in the role of expert or authority figure: the African American Lewis Howard Latimer; the Welshman William Preece, and the Irishman John Tyndall. In the USA the outstanding example Latimer was the first son of (...)
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  24.  18
    William of Ockham on the Right to (Ab-) Use Goods.Jonathan Robinson - 2009 - Franciscan Studies 67:347-374.
    William of Ockham on the right to Use Goods Quintessentially medieval—an almost word-for-word refutation of an already prolix defense of several improbationes of earlier papal decrees—its greatest claim to fame has usually been its length, not the content of Ockham's argument. Annabel Brett, for example, concluded in a remarkable study that William of Ockham had failed to adequately answer Pope John XXII's criticism of the Michaelist interpretation of Franciscan poverty. Specifically, she argued that he "failed to isolate a (...)
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  25.  13
    Dean Frederic William Farrar : Educationist.Brendan A. Rapple - 1995 - British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (1):57-74.
    Though his best-selling novel of school life Eric, or, Little by Little: A Tale of Roslyn School has over the years been the subject of much attention, the wider educational thought and practice of Frederic William Farrar, teacher, novelist, scientist, classicist, theologian, and Dean of Canterbury, has for the most part been neglected by scholars. This paper discusses certain aspects of Farrar the educationist, including his distinctive evangelical attitude toward children; his fervent criticism of the prevailing Classical (...)
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  26.  12
    Much Ado About Dugald: The Chequered Career of Dugald Stewart's Letter to Sir William Forbes on James Beattie's Essay on Truth.Richard B. Sher & Paul Wood - 2012 - History of European Ideas 38 (1):74-102.
    Summary Although Sir William Forbes of Pitsligo's An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie has long served as an invaluable resource for those interested in Beattie's life and thought, there has been little scholarship on the genesis of Forbes's book. This article considers the role played by Dugald Stewart?as well as that of his friend, Archibald Alison?in the making of Forbes's Life of Beattie. It also examines the reasons for Forbes's decision not to print Stewart's (...)
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  27.  7
    Who Was Frederic William Henry Myers?Eugene Taylor - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (11-12):11-12.
    The scientific study of consciousness in the late 19th century, which took place in Western countries across disciplines such as neurology, physiology, neuropathology, psychology, psychiatry and philosophy, appears to have striking parallels to current crossdisciplinary developments in the neurosciences. The 19th century period, however, has received little scholarly attention from historians of medicine, psychology, or science. Historians of depth psychology have investigated the area as part of the history of psychiatry, but cleaved most closely to the versions presented by (...)
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  28. Squaring the Shield: William Ridgeway's Two Models of Early Greece.Simon J. Cook - 2014 - History of European Ideas 40 (5):693-713.
    From the early 1880s the Cambridge-trained classicist William Ridgeway had applied cutting-edge anthropological theory to his reading of ancient Greek literature in order to develop an evolutionary account of the continuous development of early Greek social institutions. Then, at the turn of the century, he began to argue that archaeological evidence demonstrated that the Achaean warriors described by Homer were in origin Germanic tribesmen from north of the Alps who had but recently conquered Mycenaean Greece. The present paper inquires (...)
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  29. Editors' Introduction: The Modern Legacy of William James's A Pluralistic Universe.Brent D. Slife & Dennis C. Wendt - 2009 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 30 (3):103.
    Perhaps no name is more clearly associated with the formulation of American psychology than that of William James. Yet, one of James’s last published works, A Pluralistic Universe, is little known and rarely cited in the discipline. On the 100th anniversary of the publication of this book, the authors of this special issue of The Journal of Mind and Behavior explore the past, present, and future legacy of the provocative ideas contained in this volume for psychology, including the (...)
     
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  30.  15
    Divine Simplicity: WILLIAM E. MANN.William E. Mann - 1982 - Religious Studies 18 (4):451-471.
    In The City of God , XI, 10, St Augustine claims that the divine nature is simple because ‘it is what it has’ . We may take this as a slogan for the Doctrine of Divine Simplicity , a doctrine which finds its way into orthodox medieval Christian theological speculation. Like the doctrine of God's timeless eternality, the DDS has seemed obvious and pious to many, and incoherent, misguided, and repugnant to others. Unlike the doctrine of God's timeless eternality, the (...)
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  31.  7
    Hedonism and the Variety of Goodness: William A. Haines.William A. Haines - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (2):148-170.
    This article defends the project of giving a single pleasure-based account of goodness against what may seem a powerful challenge. Aristotle, Peter Geach and Judith Thomson have argued that there is no such thing as simply being good; there is only being a good knife or a good painting, being serene or good to eat, or being good in essence or in qualities. But I argue that these philosophers’ evidence is friendly to the hedonist project. For, I argue, hedonistic accounts (...)
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  32.  7
    The Economic and Political Liberalization of Socialism: The Fundamental Problem of Property Rights*: WILLIAM H. RIKER and DAVID L. WEIMER.William H. Riker - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (2):79-102.
    All our previous political experience, and especially, of course, the experience of Eastern Europe and Central Asia, offers little hope that democracy can coexist with the centralized allocation of economic resources. Indeed, simple observation suggests that a market economy with private property rights is a necessary, although not sufficient, condition for the existence of a democratic political regime. And this accords fully with the political theory of liberalism, which emphasizes that private rights, both civil and economic, be protected and (...)
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  33. Karl Marx's Theory of History, a Defense by G. A. Cohen; Marx's Theory of History by William H. Shaw.Henry Laycock - 1980 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):335-356.
    "Capital is moved as much and as little by the degradation and final depopulation of the human race, as by the probable fall of the earth into the sun. Apres moi le deluge! is the watchword of every capitalist and of every capitalist nation" (Marx, CAPITAL Vol 1, 380-381).
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  34. Wollaston's Early Critics.John J. Tilley - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1097-1116.
    Some of the most forceful objections to William Wollaston's moral theory come from his early critics, namely, Thomas Bott (1688-1754), Francis Hutcheson (1694-1746), and John Clarke of Hull (1687-1734). These objections are little known, while the inferior objections of Hume, Bentham, and later prominent critics are familiar. This fact is regrettable. For instance, it impedes a robust understanding of eighteenth-century British ethics; also, it fosters a questionable view as to why Wollaston's theory, although at first well received, soon (...)
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  35. Levinas's Empiricism and James's Phenomenology.Randy L. Friedman - 2012 - Journal of Scriptural Reasoning 11 (2).
    Genealogies in philosophy can be tricky and even a little dangerous. Lines of influence and inheritance run much more linearly on paper than in reality. I am often reminded of Robert Frost's "Mending Walls" and the attention that must be paid to what is being walled in and what is being walled out. In other words, William James and Emmanuel Levinas are not natural conversation partners. I have always read James as a fellow traveler of Edmund Husserl, and (...)
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  36. The Unity of Consciousness: Trouble for the Materialist or the Emergent Dualist?Warren Shrader - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (1):33-44.
    As part of his case for emergent dualism, William Hasker proffers a _unity-of-_ _consciousness_ (UOC) argument against materialism. I formalize the argument and show how the warrant for two of its premises accrues from the warrant one assigns to two distinct theses about unified conscious experience. I then argue that though both unity theses are plausible, the materialist has little to fear from Hasker.
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  37.  26
    William C. Davis' Thomas Reid's Ethics: Moral Epistemology on Legal Foundations. [REVIEW]Terence Cuneo - 2008 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 6 (1):91-104.
    Hume bequeathed to rational intuitionists a problem concerning moral judgment and the will – a problem of sufficient severity that it is still cited as one of the major reasons why intuitionism is untenable. 1 Stated in general terms, the problem concerns how an intuitionist moral theory can account for the intimate connection between moral judgment and moral motivation. One reason that this is still considered to be a problem for intuitionists is that it is widely assumed that the early (...)
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  38.  29
    William of Ockham. [REVIEW]B. W. A. - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (3):552-553.
    This monumental work by a perceptive medieval scholar is undoubtedly the most comprehensive work in any modern language of the overall system of Ockham. Its three parts deal respectively with the cognitive order, the theological order, and the created order. Leff credits the more than 30 years of research by such Ockham scholars as Hochstetter, Vignaux, Moody, Baudry, Boehner, etc., with correcting his own earlier misconception—shared by so many historians of philosophy and theology—of Ockham as the one who destroyed scholasticism (...)
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  39.  26
    Introduction to William James. [REVIEW]J. B. R. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (3):560-560.
    This book was originally written for the French series, Philosophes de tous les temps. It follows the format of this series with an introductory essay and series of brief selections from James. Although Reck states that he "sought to see James as the French see him," he does not limit himself to a single perspective but presents a judicious, balanced interpretation of James. There is little exploitation of the recent "discovery" of James by phenomenologically oriented philosophers. In his introductory (...)
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  40.  31
    Augustine's Confessions: The Story of a Divided Self and the Process of its Unification.Donald Capps - 2007 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):127-150.
    The goals of this paper are twofold. The first is to show that William James' discussion in The Varieties of Religious Experience of the divided self and the process of its unification offers an invaluable lens through which to understand the conversion experience of Augustine as presented in his Confessions. The second is explore the question of how Augustine became a divided self, a question that James chooses not to speculate about because he is suspicious of theories of causality, (...)
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  41.  12
    Freedom and the Moral Life: The Ethics of William James. [REVIEW]B. M. M. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (1):136-136.
    Freedom and unity are the values James most wanted to protect and to extend. Roth agrees with this choice, and recommends James to his readers as the moral philosopher who can best show us how. James is presented as combining a principled morality with the responsiveness to particular cases characteristic of existentialism and situational ethics, and his ethics is found to yield what John Wild would call a "primary existential norm": Act so as to maximize freedom and unity. While the (...)
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  42.  7
    5. An Ambitious Little Pragmatist.William Christian - 1996 - In George Grant: A Biography. University of Toronto Press. pp. 56-68.
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  43.  8
    ‘Can You Justify Your Existence Then? Just a Little?’: The Psychological Convergence of Sartre and Fanon.William L. Remley - 2014 - Diogenes 61 (1):44-58.
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  44.  8
    Faith—and Faith in Hypotheses1: John King-Farlow and William N. Christensen.John King-Farlow - 1971 - Religious Studies 7 (2):113-124.
    Debate continues to rage among philosophers of religion over Anthony Flew's famous little paper ‘Theology and Falsification’ and the responses it provoked, most notably R. M. Hare's response that religious claims are in no way like scientific hypotheses. For now, twenty years later, we still find many theists taking a similar tack to Hare's. A particularly interesting example is J. F. Miller in Religious Studies , 1969, who replies to Flew that propositions like ‘God loves mankind’ cannot be subject (...)
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  45.  7
    Liberty and Community: The Political Philosophy of William Ernest Hocking. [REVIEW]A. M. B. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (2):359-360.
    The author demonstrates that W. E. Hocking’s political philosophy deserves far more consideration than it has so far received not only for its being a study in political philosophy, something there is too little of in the American tradition, but also because of the importance of the problems which are the focus of the study, the problems of liberty and community. Thigpen organizes material from a wide range of sources in Hocking’s extensive bibliography into an orderly presentation that moves (...)
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  46.  6
    Talks With Father William: Senile or Sensible?Elizabeth W. Markson & Maryvonne Gognalons-Caillard - 1971 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 1 (2):193-208.
    The interviewer's desire for rapport with the respondent is both the greatest weakness and the greatest strength of semi-structured interviewing. As has been discussed at some length, structured interviews present difficulties with aged or mentally ill respondents who are unwilling or unable to play the game involved therein. Structured interviews also are impregnated with subjectivity in the form of working assumptions made by the researcher. For these reasons, they are likely to yield little understanding of the experiential world of (...)
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  47.  5
    Connectionist Models: Too Little Too Soon?William Timberlake - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):508-509.
  48.  1
    28. So What?: C.S. Peirce and William James.Nigel Warburton - 2017 - In A Little History of Philosophy. Yale University Press. pp. 164-170.
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  49.  1
    The Little Review “Ulysses,”.William M. Chace - 2016 - Common Knowledge 22 (2):314-315.
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  50.  60
    Alchemical Atoms or Artisanal "Building Blocks"?: A Response to Klein.William R. Newman - 2009 - Perspectives on Science 17 (2):pp. 212-231.
    In a recent essay review of William R. Newman, Atoms and Alchemy (2006), Ursula Klein defends her position that philosophically informed corpuscularian theories of matter contributed little to the growing knowledge of "reversible reactions" and robust chemical species in the early modern period. Newman responds here by providing further evidence that an experimental, scholastic tradition of alchemy extending well into the Middle Ages had already argued extensively for the persistence of ingredients during processes of "mixture" (e.g. chemical reactions), (...)
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