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  1. Some principles require principals : why banning 'conflicts of interest' won't solve incentive problems in biomedical research.William M. Sage - 2010 - In Thomas H. Murray & Josephine Johnston (eds.), Trust and integrity in biomedical research: the case of financial conflicts of interest. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  2.  16
    If You Would Not Criminalize Poverty, Do Not Medicalize It.William M. Sage & Jennifer E. Laurin - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (3):573-581.
    American society tends to medicalize or criminalize social problems. Criminal justice reformers have made arguments for a positive role in the relief of poverty that are similar to those aired in healthcare today. The consequences of criminalizing poverty caution against its continued medicalization.
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  3.  32
    Upstream Health Law.William M. Sage & Kelley McIlhattan - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):535-549.
    For the first time, entrepreneurs are aggressively developing new technologies and business models designed to improve individual and population health, not just to deliver specialized medical care. Consumers of these goods and services are not yet “patients”; they are simply people. As this sector of the health care industry expands, it is likely to require new forms of legal governance, which we term “upstream health law.”.
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    Upstream Health Law.William M. Sage & Kelley McIlhattan - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):535-549.
    Medicine and health are surprisingly separate. In the introduction to his 1963 master work on medical economics, Kenneth Arrow acknowledged that “the subject is the medical-care industry, not health.” In the 50 years that followed, researchers, policymakers, and public health professionals generated valuable and varied insights into health, impacting both behaviors and environments while addressing social determinants and demographic trends. Yet medical care has followed an even steeper upward trajectory, growing rapidly in scientific precision, public esteem, and technical sophistication.As a (...)
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  5.  8
    Following the Money: The ACA’s Fiscal-Political Economy and Lessons for Future Health Care Reform.William M. Sage & Timothy M. Westmoreland - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (3):434-442.
    It is no exaggeration to say that American health policy is frequently subordinated to budgetary policies and procedures. The Affordable Care Act was undeniably ambitious, reaching health care services and underlying health as well as health insurance. Yet fiscal politics determined the ACA’s design and guided its implementation, as well as sometimes assisting and sometimes constraining efforts to repeal or replace it. In particular, the ACA’s vulnerability to litigation has been the price its drafters paid in exchange for fiscal-political acceptability. (...)
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  6.  15
    Will Embryonic Stem Cells Change Health Policy?William M. Sage - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):342-351.
    Essays on stem cell policy seem to fall into three categories. Some essays in this collection are about logic and principles. Others are about practices and beliefs. The former group draws lines and defends them, a normative project. The latter group attempts to explain the lines that already exist, a descriptive project that may have important normative goals. Still other essays, by scientists, are about growing stem cell lines instead of drawing them.The purpose of this essay is to situate the (...)
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    Will Embryonic Stem Cells Change Health Policy?William M. Sage - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):342-351.
    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy concerns. Other issues, such as (...)
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  8.  6
    Swimming Together Upstream: How to Align MLP Services with U.S. Healthcare Delivery.William M. Sage & Keegan D. Warren - 2023 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 51 (4):786-797.
    Medical-legal partnership (MLP) embeds attorneys and paralegals into care delivery to help clinicians address root causes of health inequities. Notwithstanding decades of favorable outcomes, MLP is not as well-known as might be expected. In this essay, the authors explore ways in which strategic alignment of legal services with healthcare services in terms of professionalism, information collection and sharing, and financing might help the MLP movement become a more widespread, sustainable model for holistic care delivery.
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    Solidarity: unfashionable, but still American.William M. Sage - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  10.  17
    How Many Justices Does It Take to Change the U.S. Health System?William M. Sage - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (5):27-33.
    There were two ways for the solicitor general of the United States to litigate the constitutional challenge to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 brought by twenty‐six states and the National Federation of Independent Business. One path, which the solicitor general pursued, was to cautiously navigate judicial precedents, claim the barest increment of new congressional authority, and give the Supreme Court as many hooks as possible on which to hang a favorable decision.The road not traveled was to (...)
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    Minding Ps and Qs: The Political and Policy Questions Framing Health Care Spending.William M. Sage - 2016 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 44 (4):559-568.
    Tracing the evolution of political conversations about health care spending and their relationship to the formation of policy is a valuable exercise. Health care spending is about science and ethics, markets and government, freedom and community. By the late 1980s the unique upward trajectory of post-Medicare U.S. health care spending had been established, recessions and tax cuts were eroding federal and state budgets, and efforts to harness market forces to serve policy goals were accelerating. From the initial writings on “managed (...)
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