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William Matthew Diem
University of St. Thomas, Texas
  1.  9
    Reasons for Acting and the End of Man as Naturally Known.William Matthew Diem - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (4):723-756.
    Aquinas implies that there is a single end of man, which can be known by reason from the moment of discretion and without the aid of revelation. This raises the problems: What is this end? How is it known? And how are the several natural, human goods related to this one end? The essay argues, first, that the naturally known end of man is the operation of virtue rather than God; second, that the virtue in question is, in the first (...)
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  2.  5
    Reasons for Acting and the End of Man as Naturally Known in Advance.William Matthew Diem - forthcoming - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
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  3.  9
    The Analogy of Natural Law: Aquinas on First Precepts.William Matthew Diem - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
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    Book Review: Stephen J. Jensen, Knowing the Natural Law: From Precepts and Inclinations to Deriving OughtsJensenStephen J., Knowing the Natural Law: From Precepts and Inclinations to Deriving Oughts . Ix + 238 Pp. £32.50/US$34.95. ISBN 978-0-8132-2733-7. [REVIEW]William Matthew Diem - 2016 - Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):356-359.
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  5.  6
    Obligation, Justice, and Law: A Thomistic Reply to Anscombe.William Matthew Diem - unknown - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association:271-286.
    Anscombe argues in “Modern Moral Philosophy” that obligation and moral terms only have meaning in the context of a divine Lawgiver, whereas terms like ‘unjust’ have clear meaning without any such context and, in at least some cases, are incontrovertibly accurate descriptions. Because the context needed for moral-terms to have meaning does not generally obtain in modern moral philosophy, she argues that we should abandon the language of obligation, adopting instead the yet clear and meaningful language of injustice. She argues (...)
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  6.  7
    Obligation, Justice, and Law in Advance.William Matthew Diem - forthcoming - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.
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